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[0] Harris CM, Wolpert DM, Signal-dependent noise determines motor planning.Nature 394:6695, 780-4 (1998 Aug 20)

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ref: Harris-1998.08 tags: noise wolpert harris motor planning Fitt velocity variance control theory date: 01-27-2013 22:33 gmt revision:1 [0] [head]

PMID-9723616[0] Signal-dependent noise determines motor planning.

  • We present a unifying theory of eye and arm movements based on the single physiological assumption that the neural control signals are corrupted by noise whose variance increases with the size of the control signal
    • Poisson noise? (I have not read the article -- storing here for future reference.)
  • This minimum-variance theory accurately predicts the trajectories of both saccades and arm movements and the speed-accuracy trade-off described by Fitt's law.

____References____

[0] Harris CM, Wolpert DM, Signal-dependent noise determines motor planning.Nature 394:6695, 780-4 (1998 Aug 20)

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ref: Harris-2011.08 tags: microelectrodes nanocomposite immune response glia recording MEA date: 01-27-2013 22:19 gmt revision:5 [4] [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-21654037[0] In vivo deployment of mechanically adaptive nanocomposites for intracortical microelectrodes

  • J P Harris, A E Hess, S J Rowan, C Weder, C A Zorman, D J Tyler and J R Capadona Case Western University.
  • Simple idea: electrodes should be rigid enough to penetrate the brain, yet soft enough to not damage it once implanted.
  • Many studies have shown that shear stress around a microelectrode shaft causes neural die-off and glial response.
  • You can only record from neurons if they are < 100um from the electrode tip.
  • Nanocomposite material is inspired by sea cucumber skin.
    • Our materials exhibit this behaviour by mimicking the architecture and proposed switching mechanism at play in the sea cucumber dermis by utilizing a polymer NC consisting of a controllable structural scaffold of rigid cellulose nanofibres embedded within a soft polymeric matrix. When the nanofibres percolate, they interact with each other through hydrogen bonding and form a nanofibre network that becomes the load-bearing element, leading to a high overall stiffness of the NC. When combined with a polymer system which additionally undergoes a phase transition at physiologically relevant temperatures, a contrast of over two orders of magnitude for the tensile elastic modulus is exhibited.
  • Probes were 200um wide, 100um thick, and had a point sharpened to 45deg.
  • Buckle force testing was done on 53um thick, 125um wide probes sharpened to a 30deg point.
  • Penetration stress through the rat pia is 1.2e7 dynes/cm^2 for a Si probe 40um thick and 80um wide.
  • See also {1198}

____References____

[0] Harris JP, Hess AE, Rowan SJ, Weder C, Zorman CA, Tyler DJ, Capadona JR, In vivo deployment of mechanically adaptive nanocomposites for intracortical microelectrodes.J Neural Eng 8:4, 046010 (2011 Aug)

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ref: Harris-2011.12 tags: mechanically adaptive electrodes implants case western dissolving flexible histology Harris date: 01-25-2013 01:39 gmt revision:5 [4] [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-22049097[0] Mechanically adaptive intracortical implants improve the proximity of neuronal cell bodies.

  • See also [1]
  • Initial tensile modulus of 5GPa dropped to 12MPa. (almost 500-fold!)
    • Their polymer nanocomposite (NC) still swells 65-70% (with water?)
    • Implant size 100 x 200um.
  • Controlled with tungsten of identical size and coating.
  • Tethered to skull.
  • Interesting:
    • The neuronal nuclei density within 100 µm of the device at four weeks post-implantation was greater for the compliant nanocomposite compared to the stiff wire.
    • At eight weeks post-implantation, the neuronal nuclei density around the nanocomposite was maintained, but the density around the wire recovered to match that of the nanocomposite.
    • Hypothesis, in discussion: softer implants are affecting the time-course of the response rather that final results
  • The glial scar response to the compliant nanocomposite was less vigorous than it was to the stiffer wire
  • Cultured astrocytes have been shown to respond to mechanical stimuli via calcium signaling (Ostrow and Sachs, 2005).
  • Substrate stiffness is also known to shift cell differentiation in mesenchymal stem cells to be neurogenic, myogenic, or osteogenic (Engler et al., 2006).
  • In vivo studies which focus on the effects of electrode tethering have shown that untethered implants reduce the extent of the glial scar (Biran et al., 2007; Kim et al., 2004; Subbaroyan, 2007)
  • Parylene, polymide, and PDMS still each have moduli 6 orders of mangitude larger than that of the brain.
  • In some of their plots, immune response is higher around the nanocomposites!
    • Could be that their implant is still too large / stiff?
  • Note that recent research shows that vitemin may have neuroprotective effects --
    • Research has linked vimentin expression to rapid neurite extension in response to damage (Levin et al., 2009)
    • NG2+ cells that express vimentin have been proposed to support repair of central nervous system (CNS) damage, and stabilize axons in response to dieback from ED1+ cells (Alonso, 2005; Nishiyama, 2007; Busch et al., 2010)
  • Prior work (Frampton et al., 2010 PMID-20336824[2]) hypothesizes that a more compact GFAP response increases the impedance of an electrode which may decrease the quality of electrode recordings.

____References____

[0] Harris JP, Capadona JR, Miller RH, Healy BC, Shanmuganathan K, Rowan SJ, Weder C, Tyler DJ, Mechanically adaptive intracortical implants improve the proximity of neuronal cell bodies.J Neural Eng 8:6, 066011 (2011 Dec)
[1] Harris JP, Hess AE, Rowan SJ, Weder C, Zorman CA, Tyler DJ, Capadona JR, In vivo deployment of mechanically adaptive nanocomposites for intracortical microelectrodes.J Neural Eng 8:4, 046010 (2011 Aug)
[2] Frampton JP, Hynd MR, Shuler ML, Shain W, Effects of glial cells on electrode impedance recorded from neuralprosthetic devices in vitro.Ann Biomed Eng 38:3, 1031-47 (2010 Mar)

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ref: Harrison-2003.06 tags: CMOS amplifier headstage electrophysiology neural_recording low_power chopper Reid Harrison date: 01-16-2012 04:43 gmt revision:12 [11] [10] [9] [8] [7] [6] [head]

IEEE-1201998 (pdf) A low-power low-noise CMOS amplifier for neural recording applications

  • detail novel MOS-bipolar pseudoresistor element to permit amplification of low-frequency signals down to milihertz range.
  • 80 microwatt spike amplifier in 0.16mm^2 silicon with 1.5 um CMOS, 1 microwatt EEG amplifier
  • input-referred noise of 2.2uV RMS.
  • has a nice graph comparing the power vs. noise for a number of other published designs
  • i doubt the low-frequency amplification really matters for neural recording, though certainly it matters for EEG.
    • they give an equation for the noise efficiency factor (NEF), as well as much detailed background.
    • NEF better than any prev. reported. Theoretical limit is 2.9 for this topology; they measure 4.8
  • does not compare well to Medtronic amp: http://www.eetimes.com/news/design/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=197005915
    • 2 microwatt! @ 1.8V
    • chopper-stabilized
    • not sure what they are going to use it for - the battery will be killed it it has to telemeter anything!
    • need to find the report for this.
  • tutorial on chopper-stabilized amplifiers -- they have nearly constant noise v.s. frequency, and very low input/output offset.
  • References: {1056} Single unit recording capabilities of a 100 microelectrode array. Nordhausen CT, Maynard EM, Normann RA.
  • [5] see {1041}
  • [9] {1042}
  • [12] {1043}
____References____

Harrison, R.R. and Charles, C. A low-power low-noise CMOS amplifier for neural recording applications Solid-State Circuits, IEEE Journal of 38 6 958 - 965 (2003)

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ref: Harrison-2009.08 tags: low power ASIC wireless neural recording Reid Harrison Shenoy date: 01-03-2012 00:55 gmt revision:2 [1] [0] [head]

IEEE-5061585 (pdf) Wireless Neural Recording With Single Low-Power Integrated Circuit

  • 100 channels, with threshold spike extraction.
  • 900Mhz FSK transmit coil.
  • Inductive power and data link.

____References____

Harrison, R.R. and Kier, R.J. and Chestek, C.A. and Gilja, V. and Nuyujukian, P. and Ryu, S. and Greger, B. and Solzbacher, F. and Shenoy, K.V. Wireless Neural Recording With Single Low-Power Integrated Circuit Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering, IEEE Transactions on 17 4 322 -329 (2009)

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ref: Harris-2009.06 tags: Bartholow 1874 Mary experiment stimulation ICMS date: 12-29-2011 05:13 gmt revision:2 [1] [0] [head]

PMID-19286295[0] Probing the human brain with stimulating electrodes: The story of Roberts Bartholow’s (1874) experiment on Mary Rafferty

  • Excellent review / history.
  • Actual citation: Experimental investigations into the functions of the human brain" The American Journal of the medical Sciences 1874
  • Actual subject: Marry Rafferty
  • Around his time people were shifting from using intuition and observation to direct treatment to using empiricism & science, especially from work on laboratory animals.
  • One of the innovations that could not be tolerated by his colleagues was the "physiological investigations of drugs by the destruction of animal life." He was a bit of an outsider, and not terribly well liked.
  • Before then the cortex was seen to be insensitive to stimulation of any kind.
  • Ferrier 1974b: in the striatum all movements are integrated which are differentiated in the cortex" -- striatal stimulation produces general contraction, not specific contraction.
  • Ferrier 1873 was the first to discover that AC stimulation yielded more prolonged and natural movements than DC.
  • The Dura mater is extremely sensitive to pain.
  • Mary Rafferty seems to have had a tumor (he calls it an ulcer) in the meninges (epithelioma).
  • He probably spread infection into her brain through the stimulating needles.

____References____

[0] Harris LJ, Almerigi JB, Probing the human brain with stimulating electrodes: the story of Roberts Bartholow's (1874) experiment on Mary Rafferty.Brain Cogn 70:1, 92-115 (2009 Jun)

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ref: Harris-2008.03 tags: retroaxonal retrosynaptic Harris learning cortex backprop date: 12-07-2011 02:34 gmt revision:2 [1] [0] [head]

PMID-18255165[0] Stability of the fittest: organizing learning through retroaxonal signals

  • the central hypothesis: strengthening of a neuron's output synapses stabilizes recent changes in the same neuron's inputs.
    • this causes representations (as are arrived at with backprop) that are tuned to task features.
  • Retroaxonal signaling in the brain is too slow for an instructive (says at least the sign of the error wrt a current neuron's output) backprop algorithm
  • hence, retroaxonal signals are not instructive but selective.
  • At SFN Harris was looking for people to test this in a model; as (yet) unmodeled and untested, I'm suspicious of it.
  • Seems plausible, yet it also just seems to be a way of moving the responsibility for learning computation to the postsynaptic neuron (which is then propagated back to the present neuron). The theory does not immediately suggest what neurons are doing to learn their stuff; rather how they may be learning.
    • If this stabilization is based on some sort of feedback (attention? reward?), which may guide learning (except for the cortex, which does not have many (any?) DA receptors...), then I may be more willing to accept it.
    • It seems likely that the cortex is doing a lot of unsupervised learning: predicting what sensory info will come next based on present sensory info (ICA, PCA).

____References____

[0] Harris KD, Stability of the fittest: organizing learning through retroaxonal signals.Trends Neurosci 31:3, 130-6 (2008 Mar)

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ref: Harris-1998.08 tags: motor_control error variance optimal_control 1998 wolpert date: 0-0-2007 0:0 revision:0 [head]

PMID-9723616[0] Signal-dependent noise determines motor planning

  • key idea: neural control signals are corrupted by noise whose variance increases with the size of the control signal
  • this idea is sufficient to explain a number of features of human motor behavior.

____References____