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[0] Caminiti R, Johnson PB, Galli C, Ferraina S, Burnod Y, Making arm movements within different parts of space: the premotor and motor cortical representation of a coordinate system for reaching to visual targets.J Neurosci 11:5, 1182-97 (1991 May)

[0] Caminiti R, Johnson PB, Urbano A, Making arm movements within different parts of space: dynamic aspects in the primate motor cortex.J Neurosci 10:7, 2039-58 (1990 Jul)[1] Caminiti R, Johnson PB, Galli C, Ferraina S, Burnod Y, Making arm movements within different parts of space: the premotor and motor cortical representation of a coordinate system for reaching to visual targets.J Neurosci 11:5, 1182-97 (1991 May)

[0] Wahnoun R, Helms Tillery S, He J, Neuron selection and visual training for population vector based cortical control.Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 6no Issue 4607-10 (2004)[1] Wahnoun R, He J, Helms Tillery SI, Selection and parameterization of cortical neurons for neuroprosthetic control.J Neural Eng 3:2, 162-71 (2006 Jun)[2] Fetz EE, Operant conditioning of cortical unit activity.Science 163:870, 955-8 (1969 Feb 28)[3] Fetz EE, Finocchio DV, Operant conditioning of specific patterns of neural and muscular activity.Science 174:7, 431-5 (1971 Oct 22)[4] Fetz EE, Finocchio DV, Operant conditioning of isolated activity in specific muscles and precentral cells.Brain Res 40:1, 19-23 (1972 May 12)[5] Fetz EE, Baker MA, Operantly conditioned patterns on precentral unit activity and correlated responses in adjacent cells and contralateral muscles.J Neurophysiol 36:2, 179-204 (1973 Mar)[6] Humphrey DR, Schmidt EM, Thompson WD, Predicting measures of motor performance from multiple cortical spike trains.Science 170:959, 758-62 (1970 Nov 13)

[0] Kettner RE, Schwartz AB, Georgopoulos AP, Primate motor cortex and free arm movements to visual targets in three-dimensional space. III. Positional gradients and population coding of movement direction from various movement origins.J Neurosci 8:8, 2938-47 (1988 Aug)[1] Georgopoulos AP, Kettner RE, Schwartz AB, Primate motor cortex and free arm movements to visual targets in three-dimensional space. II. Coding of the direction of movement by a neuronal population.J Neurosci 8:8, 2928-37 (1988 Aug)[2] Schwartz AB, Kettner RE, Georgopoulos AP, Primate motor cortex and free arm movements to visual targets in three-dimensional space. I. Relations between single cell discharge and direction of movement.J Neurosci 8:8, 2913-27 (1988 Aug)[3] Georgopoulos AP, Kalaska JF, Caminiti R, Massey JT, On the relations between the direction of two-dimensional arm movements and cell discharge in primate motor cortex.J Neurosci 2:11, 1527-37 (1982 Nov)

[0] Georgopoulos AP, Kalaska JF, Caminiti R, Massey JT, On the relations between the direction of two-dimensional arm movements and cell discharge in primate motor cortex.J Neurosci 2:11, 1527-37 (1982 Nov)

[0] Brockwell AE, Rojas AL, Kass RE, Recursive bayesian decoding of motor cortical signals by particle filtering.J Neurophysiol 91:4, 1899-907 (2004 Apr)

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ref: Caminiti-1991.05 tags: transform motor control M1 3D population_vector premotor Caminiti date: 04-09-2007 20:10 gmt revision:2 [1] [0] [head]

PMID-2027042[0] Making arm movements within different parts of space: the premotor and motor cortical representation of a coordinate system for reaching to visual targets.

  • trained monkeys to make similar movements in different parts of external/extrinsic 3D space.
  • change of preferred direction was graded in an orderly manner across extrinsic space.
  • virtually no correlations found to endpoint static position: "virtually all cells were related to the direction and not to the end point of movement" - compare to Graziano!
  • yet the population vector remained an accurate predictor of movement: "Unlike the individual cell preferred directions upon which they are based, movement population vectors did not change their spatial orientation across the work space, suggesting that they remain good predictors of movement direction regardless of the region of space in which movements are made"

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ref: Caminiti-1990.07 tags: transform motor control M1 3D population_vector premotor Caminiti date: 04-09-2007 20:07 gmt revision:4 [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-2376768[0] Making arm movements within different parts of space: dynamic aspects in the primate motor cortex

  • monkeys made similar movements in different parts of external/extrinsic 3D space.
  • change of preferred direction was graded in an orderly manner across extrinsic space.
    • this change closely followed the changes in muscle activation required to effect the observed movements.
  • motor cortical cells can code direction of movement in a way which is dependent on the position of the arm in space
  • implies existence of mechanisms which facilitate the transformation between extrinsic (visual targets) and intrinsic coordinates
  • also see [1]

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ref: Wahnoun-2004.01 tags: BMI population_vector neural selection Brown 3D arizona ASU date: 04-06-2007 23:28 gmt revision:3 [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-17271333[0] Neuron selection and visual training for population vector based cortical control.

  • M1 and Pmd (not visual areas), bilateral.
  • a series of experiments designed to parameterize a cortical control algorithm without an animal having to move its arm.
  • a highly motivated animal observes as the computer drives a cursor move towards a set of targets once each in a center-out task.
    • how motivated? how did they do this? (primate working for its daily water rations)
  • I do not think this is the way to go. it is better to stimulate in the proper afferents and let the brain learn the control algorithm, the same as when a baby learns to crawl.
    • however, the method described here may be a good way to bootstrap., definitely.
  • want to generate an algorithm that 'tunes-up' control with a few tens of neurons, not hundreds as Miguel estimates.
  • estimate the tuning from 12 seconds of visual following (1.5 seconds per each of the 8 corners of a cube)
  • optimize over the subset of neurons (by dropping them) & computing the individual residual error.
  • their paper seems to be more of an analysis of this neuron-removal method.
  • neurons seem to maintain their tuning between visual following and brain-control.
  • they never actually did brain control

PMID-16705272[1] Selection and parameterization of cortical neurons for neuroprosthetic control

  • here they actually did neuroprosthetic control.
  • most units add noise to the control signal, a few actually improve it -> they emphasize cautious unit selection leaning to simpler computational/electrical systems.
  • point out that the idea of using chronically recorded neural signals has a very long history.. [2,3,4,5] [6] etc.
  • look like it took the monkeys about 1.6-1.8 seconds to reach the target.
    • minimum summed path length / distance to target = 3.5. is that good?

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ref: Kettner-1988.08 tags: 3D motor control population_vector Schwartz Georgopoulos date: 04-05-2007 17:09 gmt revision:1 [0] [head]

A triptych of papers (good job increasing your publication count, guys!):

  • PMID-3411363[0] Primate motor cortex and free arm movements to visual targets in three-dimensional space. III. Positional gradients and population coding of movement direction from various movement origins.
    • propose multilinear model to predict firing rate of nneuron (a regression that is the same direction as the kalman filter)
    • i don't see how this is that much different from below (?)
  • PMID-3411362[1] Primate motor cortex and free arm movements to visual targets in three-dimensional space. II. Coding of the direction of movement by a neuronal population.
    • they show, basically, that they can predict movement direction (note this is different from actual movement!) using the poulation vector scheme.
  • PMID-3411361[2] Primate motor cortex and free arm movements to visual targets in three-dimensional space. I. Relations between single cell discharge and direction of movement.
    • 568 cells!!
    • 8 directional targets, again -- not sure how they were aranged; they say 'in approximately equal angular intervals'
    • these findings generalize the previous 2D results [3] (tuning to external space) to 3D

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ref: Georgopoulos-1982.11 tags: georgopoulos kalaska caminiti M1 motor control tuning population_vector date: 04-05-2007 16:27 gmt revision:0 [head]

PMID-7143039[0] On the relations between the direction of two-dimensional arm movements and cell discharge in primate motor cortex

  • famous 8-target center out task
  • dot-product tuning
  • 75% of cells were found to be tuned.
  • posits the population code for directional movements - statistical summation & averaging, i presume.

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ref: Brockwell-2004.04 tags: particle_filter Brockwell BMI 2004 wiener filter population_vector MCMC date: 02-05-2007 18:54 gmt revision:1 [0] [head]

PMID-15010499[0] Recursive Bayesian Decoding of Motor Cortical Signals by Particle Filtering

  • It seems that particle filtering is 3-5 times more efficient / accurate than optimal linear control, and 7-10 times more efficient than the population vector method.
  • synthetic data: inhomogeneous poisson point process, 400 bins of 30ms width = 12 seconds, random walk model.
  • monkey data: 258 neurons recorded in independent experiments in the ventral premotor cortex. monkey performed a 3D center-out task followed by an ellipse tracing task.
  • Bayesian methods work optimally when their models/assumptions hold for the data being analyzed.
  • Bayesian filters in the past were computationally inefficient; particle filtering was developed as a method to address this problem.
  • tested the particle filter in a simulated study and a single-unit monkey recording ellipse-tracing experiment. (data from Rena and Schwartz 2003)
  • there is a lot of math in the latter half of the paper describing their results. The tracings look really good, and I guess this is from the quality of the single-unit recordings.
  • appendix details the 'innovative methodology ;)

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