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ref: -0 tags: tungsten rhenium refactory metals book russia metalurgy date: 10-31-2016 05:14 gmt revision:1 [0] [head]

Physical Metallurgy of Refactory Metals and Alloys

Properties of tungsten-rhenium alloys

  • Luna metals suggests 3% Re improves the tensile strength of the alloy; Concept Alloys has 26% Re.
  • This paper mesured 20% Re, with a strength of 1.9 GPa; actual drawn tungsten wire has a strength of 3.3 GPa.
    • Drawing and cold working greatly affects metal, as always!

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ref: -0 tags: adhesion polymer metal FTIR epoxy eponol paint date: 05-01-2015 19:20 gmt revision:0 [head]

Degradation of polymer/substrate interfaces – an attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy approach

  • Suggests why eponol is used as an additive to paint.
  • In this thesis, attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy has been used to detect changes at the interfaces between poly (vinyl butyral-co-vinyl alcohol-co-vinyl acetate) (PVB) and ZnSe upon exposure to ozone, humidity and UV-B light.
  • Also, the response of PVB-aluminum interfaces to liquid water has been studied and compared with the same for eponol (epoxy resin, diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A)-aluminum interfaces.
  • In the presence of ozone, humidity and UV-B radiation, an increase in carbonyl group intensity was observed at the PVB-ZnSe interface indicating structural degradation of the polymer near the interface. However, such changes were not observed when PVB coated ZnSe samples were exposed to moisture and UV-B light in the absence of ozone showing that ozone is responsible for the observed structural deterioration. Liquid water uptake kinetics for the degraded PVB monitored using ATR-FTIR indicated a degradation of the physical structural organization of the polymer film.
  • Exposure of PVB coated aluminum thin film to de-ionized water showed water incorporation at the interface. There were evidences for polymer swelling, delamination and corrosion of the aluminum film under the polymer layer.
    • On the contrary, delamination/swelling of the polymer was not observed at the eponol-aluminum interface, although water was still found to be incorporated at the interface. Al-O species were also observed to form beneath the polymer layer.
    • A decrease of the C-H intensities was detected at the PVB-aluminum interface during the water uptake of the polymer, whereas an increase of the C-H intensities was observed for the eponol polymer under these conditions.
    • This is assigned to rearrangement of the macromolecular polymer chains upon interaction with water.

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ref: -0 tags: palladium metal glass tought strong caltech date: 02-25-2014 19:02 gmt revision:1 [0] [head]

A damage-tolerant glass

  • Perhaps useful for the inserter needle?
  • WC-Co Tungesten carbide-cobalt cermet is another alternative.

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ref: -0 tags: parylene metal adhesion Stieglitz date: 08-15-2013 17:22 gmt revision:0 [head]

PMID-20119944 Characterization of parylene C as an encapsulation material for implanted neural prostheses.

  • On Si3N4, platinum, and a first film of parylene-C, satisfactory adhesion was achieved with silane A-174, even after steam sterilization. (>1 N/cm)
  • higher adhesion for the parylene that was deposited at lower pressures.
  • but: higher deposition pressures results in lower crystalinity.
  • [33] parylene can be used to build freestanding nanowires.
  • Parylene does not stick to polyimide.
  • Parylene sticks to parylene well if left untreated.
  • Annealing parylene dramatically increased crystalinity / decreases elongation to break.
  • The deposited parylene C layers on untreated and with oxygen plasma-treated samples delaminated immediately after contact with saline. The behavior was also observed at two out of three samples of the A-174 treated wafers, but not in this magnitude.
    • A potential reason for these results could be contamination of the samples during assembly or excessive treatment with the adhesion promoter.

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ref: -0 tags: ACF chip bonding parylene field's metal polyimide date: 07-10-2013 18:34 gmt revision:10 [9] [8] [7] [6] [5] [4] [head]

We're making parylene electrodes for neural recording, and one critical step is connecting them to recording electronics.

Currently Berkeley uses ACF (anisotropic conductive film) for connection, which is widely used for connecting flex tape to LCD panels, or for connecting driver chips to LCD glass. According to the internet, pitches can be as low as 20um, with pad areas as low as 800um^2. source

However, this does not seem to be a very reliable nor compact process with platinum films on parylene, possibly because ACF bonding relies on raised areas between mated conductors (current design has the Pt recessed into the parylene), and on rigid substrates. ACF consists of springy polymer balls coated in Ni and Au and embedded in a thermoset epoxy resin. The ACF film is put under moderate temperature (180C) and pressure (3mpa, 430psi), which causes the epoxy to cure in a state that leaves the gold/nickel/polymer balls to be compressed between the two conductors. Hence, even if the conductors move slightly due to thermal cycling, the small balls maintain good mechanical and electrical contact. The balls are dispersed sufficiently in the epoxy matrix that there is little to no chance of conduction between adjacent pads.

(Or so I have learned from the internet.) Now, as mentioned, this is an imperfect method for joining Pt on parylene films, possibly because the parylene is so flexible, and the platinum foil is very thin (200-300 nm). Indeed, platinum does not bond very strongly to parylene, hence care must be taken to allow sufficient overlap to prevent water ingress. My proposed solution -- to be tested shortly -- is to use a low-melting temperature metal with strong wetting ability -- such as Field's metal (bismuth, tin, indium, melting point 149F, see http://www.gizmology.net/fusiblemetals.htm) to low-temperature solder the platinum to a carrier board (initially) or to a custom amplifier ASIC (later!). Parylene is stable to 200C (392F), so this should be safe. One worry is that the indium/bismuth will wet the parylene or polyimide, too; however I consider this unlikely due to the difficulty in attaching parylene to any metal.

That said, there must be good reason why ACF is so popular, so perhaps a better ultimate solution is to stiffen the parylene (or ultimately polyimide) substrate so that it can support both the temperature/pressure of ACF bonding and the stress of a continued electrical/mechanical bond to polyimide fan-out board or ASIC. It may also be possible to gold or nickel electroplate the connector pads to be slightly raised instead of recessed.


Update: ACF bond to rigid 1/2 oz copper, 4mil trace / space connector (3mil trace/space board):

Note that the copper traces are raised, and the parylene is stretched over the uneven surface (this is much easier to see with the stereo microscope). To the left of the image, the ACF paste has been sqeezed out from between the FR4 and parylene. Also note that the platinum can make potential contact with vias in the PCB.


Update 7/2: Fields metal (mentioned above) does stick to platinum reasonably well, but it also sticks to parylene (somewhat), and glass (exceptionally well!). In fact, I had a difficult time removing traces of field's metal from the Pyrex beakers that I was melting the metal with. These beakers were filled with boiling water, which may have been the problem.

When I added flux (Kester flux-pen 951 No-clean MSDS), the metal became noticeably more shiny, and the contact angle increased on the borosilicate glass (e.g. looked more like mercury); this leads me to believe that it is not the metal itself that attaches to glass, but rather oxides of indium and bismuth. Kester 951 flux consists of:

  • 2-propanol 15% (as a denaturing agent) boiling point 82.6C
  • Ethanol 73% (solvent) boiling point 78.3C
  • Butyl Acetate 7% boiling point 127C, flash point 27C
  • Methanol <3% b.p. 64.7C
  • Carboxylic acids < 3% -- proton donors? formic or oxalic acid?
  • Surfacants < 1% -- ?
Total boiling point is 173F.

After coating the parylene/platinum sample with flux, I raised the field's metal to the flux activation point, which released some smoke and left brown organic residues on the bottom of the glass dish. Then I dipped the parylene probe into the molten metal, causing the flux again to be activated, and partially wetting the platinum contacts. The figure below shows the result:

Note the incomplete wetting, all the white solids left from the process, and how the field's metal caused the platinum to delaminate from the parylene when the cable was (accidentally) flexed. Tests with platinum foil revealed that the metal bond was not actually that strong, significantly weaker than that made with a flux-core SnPb solder. also, I'm not sure of the activation temperature of this flux, and think I may have overheated the parylene.


Update 7/10:

Am considering electrodeless Ni / Pt / Au deposition, which occurs in aqueous solution, hence at much lower temperatures than e-beam evaporation Electrodeless Ni ref. On polyimide substrates, there is extensive literature describing how to activate the surface for plating: Polyimides and Other High Temperature Polymers: Synthesis ..., Volume 4. Parylene would likely need a different possibly more aggressive treatment, as it does not have imide bonds to open.

Furthermore, if the parylene / polyimide surface is *not* activated, the electrodeless plating could be specific to the exposed electrode and contact sites, which could help to solve the connector issue by strengthening & thickening the contact areas. The second fairly obvious solution is to planarize the contact site on the PCB, too, as seen above. ACF bonds can be quite reliable; last night I took apart (and successfully re-assembled) my 32" Samsung LCD monitor, and none of the flex-on-glass or chip-on-flex binds failed (despite my clumsy hands!).

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ref: -0 tags: microelectrodes original metal pipette glass recording MEA date: 01-31-2013 19:46 gmt revision:6 [5] [4] [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

IEEE-4065599 (pdf) Comments on Microelectrodes

  • The amplifiers themselves, even back in 1950's, posed no problems -- low bandwidth. All that is required is low noise and high input impedance.
  • KCl Glass electrodes are LPF (10M resistive + 10pf parasitic capacitance); metal HPF (capacitive).
    • The fluid tip will not see external triphasic spikes of vertebrate axons above the noise level.
  • Metal probe the most useful.
  • Pt electrode in CSF behaves like a capacitor at low voltage across a broad frequency range. CSF has compounds that retard oxidation; impedance is more resistive with physiological saline.
  • Noise voltage generated by a metal electrode best specified by equivalent noise resistance at room temperature, E rmsnoise=4kTR nδF E_{rms noise} = \sqrt{4 k T R_{n} \delta F} R_n should equal the real part of the electrode impedance at the same frequency.
  • Much of electrochemistry: solid AgCl diffuses away from an electrode tip with great speed and can hardly be continuously formed with an imposed current. Silver forms extremely stable complexes with organic molecules having attached amino and sulfhydril groups which occur in plenty where the electrode damages the tissue. Finally, the reduction-oxidation potential of axoplasm is low enough to reduce methylene blue, which places it below hydrogen. AgCl and HgCl are reduced.
  • The external current of nerve fibers is the second derivative of the traveling spike, the familiar triphasic (??) transient.
  • Svaetichin [1] and Dowben and Rose [3] plated with Platinum black. This increases the surface area.
    • Very quickly it burns onto itself a shell of very adherent stuff. It is kept from intimate contact with the tissue around it by a shell.
    • We found that if we add gelatin to the chloroplatinic acid bath from which we plate the Pt, the ball is not only made adherent to the tip but is, in a sense, prepoisoned and does not burn a shell into itself.
  • glass insulation using woods metal (which melts at a very low temperature). Platinum ball was plated onto 2-3um pipette tip. 3um gelatinized platinum black ball, impedance 100kOhm at 1kHz.
    • Highly capacitive probe: can be biased to 1 volt by a polarizing current of 1e-10 amp. (0.1nA).
  • Getting KCl solution into 1um pipettes is quite hard! They advise vacuum boiling to remove the air bubbles.
  • Humble authors, informative paper.

____References____

' ''' ()

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ref: -0 tags: metal halide lamp date: 02-14-2007 21:28 gmt revision:1 [0] [head]

for a barco data 3200LC, you need a HMI575/SE (single ended) lamp. unfortunately, this only lasts 750 hours :( and costs $150 http://www.bulbman.com/index.php?main_page=product_bulb_info&cPath=5399&products_id=10858

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ref: bookmark-0 tags: metal_halide projector light CRI Venture Osram Phillips date: 0-0-2007 0:0 revision:0 [head]

Overview: a projector light should have good luminous efficiency, have a long life, and most importantly have plenty of energy in the red region of the spectrum. most metal halides have yellow/green lines and blue lines, few have good red lines.

http://www.osram.no/brosjyrer/english/K01KAP5_en.pdf in 1000 watt, the Osram Powerstar HQI-TS 1000/d/s looks the best: CRI > 90, 5900K color temperature. Unfortunately, I cannot seem to find any american places to buy this bulb, nor can i determine its average life. It can be bought, at a price, from http://www.svetila.com/eProdaja/product_info.php/products_id/442 { n.b. the osram HMI bulbs are no good-the lifetime is too short}

In 400 watt, the Eye Clean Arc MT400D/BUD looks quite good, with a CRI of 90, 6500K color temp. http://www.eyelighting.com/cleanarc.html. EYE also has a ceraarc line, but the 400w bulb is not yet in production (and it has a lower color temperature, 4000K). Can be bought from http://www.businesslights.com/ (N.B. they have spectral charts for many of the lights!)

  • I've also seen reference to the Phillips mastercolor line: http://www.nam.lighting.philips.com/us/ecatalog/hid/pdf/p-5497c.pdf
    • these are ceramic HPS white replacements ('retro-white'). 85CRI, 4000K color temperature, reasonably efficient over the life of the bulb.
  • Ushio
  • Venture lighting has a 400W naturalWhite e-lamp (5000k, 90+ CRI). For use with both pulse-start and the electronic ballasts that they sell.

and fYI, the electrodelass bulbs are made by Osram and are called "ICETRON". They are rather expensive, but last 1e5 hours (!). Typical output is 80 lumens/watt

more things of interest:

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ref: bookmark-0 tags: teflon PTFE bonding metal polytetrafluoroethylene tetraflouroethylene date: 0-0-2006 0:0 revision:0 [head]

http://pslc.ws/mactest/ptfeidea.htm

block copolymer: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copolymer