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ref: -0 tags: buszaki watson oscillations review gamma theta hippocampus cortex date: 09-30-2013 18:32 gmt revision:2 [1] [0] [head]

PMID-23393413 Brain rhythms and neural syntax: implications for efficient coding of cognitive content and neuropsychiatric disease.

  • His frequency band standards:
    • delta: 1.5 - 4Hz
    • theta: 4 - 10Hz
    • beta: 10 - 30 Hz
    • gamma: 30 - 80Hz
    • fast: 80 - 200 Hz
    • ultra fast: 200 - 600 Hz.
  • comodugram: power-power correlelogram
  • Reviews current understanding of important rhythms:
    • How gamma is preserved amongs mammals, owing to the same fundamental mechanisms (membrane time constant, GABA transmission, AMPA receptior latency) all around 25ms; suggests that this is a means of tieing neurons into meaningful groups. or symbols; (solves the binding problem?)
    • Theta rhythm, in comparison, varies between species, inversely based on the size of the hippocampus. Larger hippocampus -> greater axonal delay.
    • These and other the critical step is to break neurons into symbols (as part of a 'language' or sequenced computation), not arbitrarily long trains of spikes which are arbitrarily difficult to parse.
  • Reviews the potential role of oscillations in active sensing, though with a rather conjectorial voice: suggests that sensory systems
  • Suggests that neocortical slow-wave oscillations during sleep are critical for transferring information from the hippocampus to the cortex: the cortex become excitable at particular phases of SWS, which biases the fast ripples from the hippocampus. During wakefulness, the direction is reversed -- the hippocampus 'requests' information from the neocortex by gating gamma with theta rhythms.
  • "Typically, when oscillators of different freqencies are coupled, the network oscillation frequency is determined by the fastest one. (??)
  • I actually find figure 3 to be rather weak -- the couplings are not that obvious, espeically if this is the cherry-picked example.
  • Cross phasing-coupling, or n:m coupling: one observes m events associated with the “driven” cycle of one frequency occurring at n different times or phases in the “stimulus” cycle of the other.
    • The mechanism of cross-frequency coupling may for the backbone of neural syntax, which allows for both segmentation and linking of cell assemblies into assemblies (leters) and sequences (words). Hmm. this seems like a stretch, but I am ever cautious.
  • Brain oscillations for quantifiable phenotypes! e.g. you can mono-zygotic twins apart from di-zygotic twins.

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ref: -0 tags: Hutchison oscillations basal ganglia beta gamma globus pallidus date: 03-26-2012 16:21 gmt revision:2 [1] [0] [head]

PMID-15496658 Neuronal oscillations in the basal ganglia and movement disorders: evidence from whole animal and human recordings.

  • This is a review / mini-symposium (only 3 pages)
    • Cites other Hutchison papers: 1997, 1998.
  • Critique classical hypothesis in that GPi firing does not increase that much, 10-22% in animal models. IT explains akinesia and bradykinesia, but not rigidity or tremor. (This was 8 years ago, remember!)
    • Plus, most neurons have intrinsic pacemaker-like properties that sets the rate of firing in the absence of synaptic input. (Bevan et al 2002).
  • Oscillations:
    • Alpha band enhanced after MPTP treatment in green monkeys and in the STN of some PD patients with tremor at rest.
    • Higher frequency oscillations (beta, 15-25Hz) can be observed in some patients without resting tremor.
    • Much slower oscillations discovered by Judith Walters, 6 OHDA rat (0.3 - 2Hz).
    • Also ultralow, multisecond oscillations, which appear in dopamine stimulated rats. (Ruskin et al 1999a,,b, 2003).
      • Lesion of the STN was not found to change these ultralow oscillations, but did modify the connectivity between GP and SNr.
    • Courtemanche et al 2003 studied the possible normal physiological function for oscillations in basal ganglia networks.
      • Beta band decreased during saccadic eye movements.
      • LFP syncronization showed task-related decrease, but only in sites engaged in the task, as evicenced by saccade-related activity.
  • Boraud tested gradual small-dose administration of MPTP toxin:
    • Minimal changes in the average firing rate of GPi neurons
    • Oscillatory activity between 4-9 and 11-14 Hz, with differences between monkeys.
      • Oscillations increased with symptom presentation.
  • Goldberg et al 2004: analyzed coherence between EEG and BG LFP; surmise that in the PD condition the basal ganglia and cortex become more closely entrained by global brain dynamics, which are reflected in the widespread local field potentials.
  • Peter Brown: oscillations in the beta band are enhanced to such an extent in Parkinson's disease that voluntary movements are not generated because motor command for initiation cannot override the enhanced oscillatory state.
    • That is, movement initiation corresponds to beta-band desynchronization, and movement command cannot 'break through'.

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ref: -3000 tags: DBS STN oscillations beta gamma research date: 02-21-2012 16:51 gmt revision:22 [21] [20] [19] [18] [17] [16] [head]

There seems to be an interesting connection between excessive grip force, isometric muscle contraction causing coherence between motor cortex and EMG, lack of inhibition on delayed response and go-no-go task, and experiments with STN lesioned rats, and the high/low oscillation hypothesis. Rather tenuous, I suppose, but let me spell it out. ( My personal impression, post-hoc, is that this is an epiphenomena of something else; evidence is contradictory.)

  1. PD patients, STN DBS impairs ability to match force characteristics to task requirements both in terms of grip force {88}, and when lifting heavy and light objects {88-2}. This is consistent with GPi function controlling the vigor or scaling of muscle responses
  2. Isometric force creation frequently engages the piper rhythm between cortex and muscles {1066}, which may be a means of preserving motor state {1066-4}.
  3. In PD patients there is marked increase in beta oscillation and synchronization {1064}, which decreases during movement {829}. Some suggest that it may be a non-coding resting state {969}, though beta-band energy is correlated with PD motor symptoms PMID-17005611, and STN DBS attenuates the power in the beta band {710-2},{753},{1073}, and DCS is likely to do the same PMID-21039949. Alternatively synchrony limits the ability to encode meaningful information. The beta band activity does not seem associated with rest tremor {1075}. Furthermore, beta band decreases prior and during movement, and with the administration of levodopa oscillation shifts to higher frequency -- the same frequency as the piper rhythm {1075}. Closed-loop stimulation with a delay (80ms) designed to null the beta oscillations is more effective than continuous high frequency DBS {967}.
  4. PD patients have deficits in inhibition on go-no-go and delayed response tasks that is exacerbated by STN DBS {1077-3}, as well as expedited decision making in conflict situations {1077} Lesioning the STN in rats has similar effect on delayed reward task performance, though it's somewhat more complicated. (and their basal ganglia is quite a bit different). {677}.
  5. The <30 Hz and >30Hz bands are inversely affected by both movement and dopamine treatment. {1069}

footnote: how much is our search for oscillations informed by our available analytical techniques?

Hypothesis: Impulsivity may be the cognitive equivalent of excess grip force; maintenance of consistent 'force' or delayed decision making benefits from Piper-band rhythms, something which PD abolishes (gradually, through brain adaptation). DBS disrupts the beta (resting, all synchronized) rhythm, and thereby permits movement. However it also effectively 'lesions' the STN, which leads to cognitive deficits and poor force control. (Wait .. DBS plus levodopa improves 40-60Hz energy -- this would argue against the hypothesis. Also, stroke in the STN in normal individuals causes hemiballismus, which resolves gradually; this is not consistent with oscillations, but rather connectivity and activity.)

Testing this hypothesis: well, first of all, is there beta-band oscillations in our data? what about piper band? We did not ask the patients to delay response, so any tests thereof will be implicit. Can look at relative energy 10Hz-30Hz and 30Hz-60Hz in the spike traces & see if this is modulated by hand position. (PETH as usual).

So. I made PETHs for beta / gamma power ratio of the spiking rate, controlled by shuffling the PETH triggers. Beta power was between 12 and 30 Hz; gamma between 30 and 75 Hz, as set by a noncausal IIR bandpass filter. The following is a non-normalized heatmap of all significant PETHs over all sessions triggered when the hand crossed the midpoint between targets. (A z-scored heatmap was made as well; it looked worse).

X is session number, Y time, 0 = -1 sec. sampling rate = 200 Hz. In one file (the band) there seems to be selective gamma inhibition about 0.5 sec before peak movement. Likely it is an outlier. 65 neurons of 973 (single and multiunits together) were significantly 'tuned' = 6.6%; marginally significant by binomial test (p=0.02). Below is an example PETH, with the shuffled distribution represented by mean +- 1 STD in blue.

The following heatmap is created from the significant PETHs triggered on target appearance.

80 of the 204 significant PETHs are from PLEX092606005_a. The total number of significant responses (204/1674, single units and multiunits) is significant by the binomial test p < 0.001, with and without Sept. 26 removed. Below is an example plot (092606005). Looks pretty damn good, actually.

Let's see how stable this relationship is by doing a leave-half out cross-validation, 10 plies, in red below (all triggers plotted in black)

Looks excellent! Problem is we are working with a ratio, which is prone to spikes. Fix: work in log space.

Aggregate response remains about the same. 192 / 1674 significant (11.5%)

In the above figure, positive indicates increased β\beta power relative to γ\gamma power. The square shape is likely relative to (negative lags) hold time and (positive lags) reaction time, though the squareness is somewhat concerning. Recording is from VIM.

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ref: Berke-2009.09 tags: DBS oscillations high gamma synchronization date: 02-16-2012 17:48 gmt revision:1 [0] [head]

PMID-19659455[0] Fast oscillations in cortical-striatal networks switch frequency following rewarding events and stimulant drugs.

  • 50 Hz resting rhythm in the straitum is coherent with the piriform cortex;
  • Striatum synchronizes with the frontal cortex at 80-100 Hz following reward or amphetamine administration.
  • Switching between discrete oscillatory states may allow different modes of information processing during decision-making and reinforcement-based learning, and may also be an important systems-level process by which stimulant drugs affect cognition and behavior.

____References____

[0] Berke JD, Fast oscillations in cortical-striatal networks switch frequency following rewarding events and stimulant drugs.Eur J Neurosci 30:5, 848-59 (2009 Sep)

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ref: ODoherty-2011 tags: Odoherty Nicolelis ICMS stimulation randomly patterned gamma distribution date: 01-03-2012 06:55 gmt revision:1 [0] [head]

IEEE-6114258 (pdf) Towards a Brain-Machine-Brain Interface:Virtual Active Touch Using Randomly Patterned Intracortical Microstimulation.

  • Key result: monkeys can discriminate between constant-frequency ICMS and aperiodic pulses, hence can discriminate some fine temporal aspects of ICMS.
  • Also discussed blanking methods for stimulating and recording at the same time (on different electrodes, using the randomized stimulation patterns).

____References____

O'Doherty, J. and Lebedev, M. and Li, Z. and Nicolelis, M. Towards a Brain #x2013;Machine #x2013;Brain Interface:Virtual Active Touch Using Randomly Patterned Intracortical Microstimulation Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering, IEEE Transactions on PP 99 1 (2011)

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ref: BuzsAki-1996.04 tags: hippocampus neocortex theta gamma consolidation sleep Buzsaki review learning memory date: 12-07-2011 02:31 gmt revision:6 [5] [4] [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-8670641[0] The hippocampo-neocortical dialogue.

  • the entorhinal ctx is bidirectionally conneted to nearly all areas of the neocortical mantle.
  • Buzsaki correctly predicts that information gathered during exploration is played back at a faster scale during synchronous population busts during (comnsummatory) behaviors.
  • looks like a good review of the hippocampus, but don't have time to read it now.
  • excellent explanation of the anatomy (with some omissions, click through to read the caption):
  • SPW = sharp waves, 40-120ms in duration. caused by synchronous firing in much of the cortex ; occur 0.02 - 3 times/sec in daily activity & during slow wave sleep.
    • BUzsaki thinks that this may be related to memory consolidation.
  • check the cited-by articles : http://cercor.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/6/2/8
____References____
[0] Buzsaiki G, The hippocampo-neocortical dialogue.Cereb Cortex 6:2, 81-92 (1996 Mar-Apr)

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ref: Eusebio-2009.05 tags: DBS STN beta gamma oscillations synchrony tremor review date: 03-23-2009 18:32 gmt revision:1 [0] [head]

PMID-19233172[0] Synchronisation in the beta frequency-band - The bad boy of parkinsonism or an innocent bystander?

  • Excessive synchronisation of basal ganglia neuronal activity in the beta frequency band has been implicated in Parkinson's disease
  • However, the extent to which beta synchrony has a mechanistic (rather than epiphenomenal) role in parkinsonism remains unclear, and the suppression of this activity by deep brain stimulation is contentious.
PMID-16289053[1] Intra-operative STN DBS attenuates the prominent beta rhythm in the STN in Parkinson's disease.
  • Beta rhythm for them = 11-30Hz. Observed in the LFP recorded from the DBS electrode itself.
  • This study shows for the first time that STN DBS attenuates the power in the prominent beta band recorded in the STN of patients with PD.

____References____

[0] Eusebio A, Brown P, Synchronisation in the beta frequency-band - The bad boy of parkinsonism or an innocent bystander?Exp Neurol no Volume no Issue no Pages (2009 Feb 20)
[1] Wingeier B, Tcheng T, Koop MM, Hill BC, Heit G, Bronte-Stewart HM, Intra-operative STN DBS attenuates the prominent beta rhythm in the STN in Parkinson's disease.Exp Neurol 197:1, 244-51 (2006 Jan)