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ref: bookmark-0 tags: machine_learning research_blog parallel_computing bayes active_learning information_theory reinforcement_learning date: 12-31-2011 19:30 gmt revision:3 [2] [1] [0] [head]

hunch.net interesting posts:

  • debugging your brain - how to discover what you don't understand. a very intelligent viewpoint, worth rereading + the comments. look at the data, stupid
    • quote: how to represent the problem is perhaps even more important in research since human brains are not as adept as computers at shifting and using representations. Significant initial thought on how to represent a research problem is helpful. And when it’s not going well, changing representations can make a problem radically simpler.
  • automated labeling - great way to use a human 'oracle' to bootstrap us into good performance, esp. if the predictor can output a certainty value and hence ask the oracle all the 'tricky questions'.
  • The design of an optimal research environment
    • Quote: Machine learning is a victim of it’s common success. It’s hard to develop a learning algorithm which is substantially better than others. This means that anyone wanting to implement spam filtering can do so. Patents are useless here—you can’t patent an entire field (and even if you could it wouldn’t work).
  • More recently: http://hunch.net/?p=2016
    • Problem is that online course only imperfectly emulate the social environment of a college, which IMHO are useflu for cultivating diligence.
  • The unrealized potential of the research lab Quote: Muthu Muthukrishnan says “it’s the incentives”. In particular, people who invent something within a research lab have little personal incentive in seeing it’s potential realized so they fail to pursue it as vigorously as they might in a startup setting.
    • The motivation (money!) is just not there.