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ref: Maquet-2001.11 tags: sleep learning memory Maquet date: 03-20-2009 18:38 gmt revision:1 [0] [head]

PMID-11691982[0] The Role of Sleep in Learning and Memory

  • 8 years ago; presumably much has changed?
  • NREM = SWS; REM = PS (paradoxical sleep)
  • nice table in there! looks as though he was careful in background research on this one; plenty of references.
  • "indeed, stress can also lead to an increase in REM sleep." -- but this may only be related to the presence of new material.
    • however, there is no increase in REM sleep if there is no material to learn.
  • reminder that theta rhythm is seen in the hippocampus in both exploratory activity and in REM sleep.
    • anticipated the presence of replay in the hippocampus
  • spindles allow the entry of Ca+2, which facilitates LTP (?).
  • I should check up on songbird learning (mentioned in the review!).
    • Young zebra finches have to establish the correspondence between vocal production (motor output) and the resulting auditory feedback (sensory).
    • This cannot be done during waking because the bird song arises from tightly time-coded sequence of activity; during sleep, however, motor output can be compared to sensory feedback (so as to capture an inverse model?)
  • PGO (ponto-geniculo-occipital) waves occur immediately before REM sleep. PGO waves are more common in rats after aversive training.
  • ACh increases cortical plasticity in adult mammals; REM sleep is characterized by a high level of ACh and 5-HT (serotonin).
---
  • sleep may not be necessary for recall-based learning, it just may be a goot time for it. Sharp waves and ripples are observed in both quiet waking and SWS.
  • Learning to reach in a force field is consolidated in 5 hours after training. [1]
  • Again mentions the fact that antidipressant drugs, which drastically reduce the amount of REM sleep, do not aversely affect memory.

____References____

[0] Maquet P, The role of sleep in learning and memory.Science 294:5544, 1048-52 (2001 Nov 2)
[1] Shadmehr R, Brashers-Krug T, Functional stages in the formation of human long-term motor memory.J Neurosci 17:1, 409-19 (1997 Jan 1)