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ref: Delgado-1964 tags: Delgado wireless stimulation record stimoceiver rhesus monkey date: 01-03-2012 07:07 gmt revision:5 [4] [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

bibtex: delgado-1964 Personality, education, and electrical stimulation of the brain

  • images/977_1.pdf
  • "Is it conceivable that behavior or the psyche can be related to electronics? Before answering these questions, we should ask one more: what is the main difference between primitive tribesmen still living in the jungle and the civilized human beings so well represented by this audience?" Education.
  • Kinda a ramble saying how education and understanding the brain is essential to our future.
  • Against atomic deterrence, unsurprisingly.
    • We are in the precarious race between the acquisition of many megatons of destructive power and the development of intelligent human beings who will make wise use of the forces at our disposal"
  • Radio receiver on a belt.
  • Elicited very complex movements from stimulating the thalamus, including walking from one side of the cage to the other, including avoiding the boss monkey!
    • He calls this 'electrical stimulation of the will'.
  • stimulate nucleus postero-ventralis induces targeted, well-directed attacks against other males of the group.
  • Stimulation of the caudate-septal lobes, just behind the frontal lobes, causes the boss monkey to become tame / tolerant / less aggressive.
  • When this function was enabled by pressing a button in the monkeys cage, the monkey most harrassed learned to press the button to halt the boss's aggressive behavior.
  • Regarding patients: "some of these patients have undergone testing for weeks or months, and lead a nearly normal life wthile 10, 20 or even more fine wires were present, in different cerebral areas and ready for stimulation from outside the scalp."
    • For example, in one patient, who spike a mean of 8.5 words per minute, by means of stimulation to the second temporal column increased his conversation to 44 words per minute." Menwhile, the number of friendly remarks increased by a factor of 9.
  • "Knowledge of the human mind may be decisive for our pursuit of happiness and for the very existence of mankind"

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ref: Delgado-1968.1 tags: Delgado wireless stimulation recording electrode date: 01-03-2012 03:22 gmt revision:3 [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-5683678[0] Intracerebral radio stimulation and recording in completely free patients.

  • images/978_1.pdf
  • See: The cordoba bull ranch experiment (youtube).
  • "This paper reports instrumentation used and clinical application in four patients with psychomotor epilepsy in whom electrodes had been implanted in the temporal lobes. To our knowledge, this is the first clinical use of intracerebral radio stimulation and recording in man. "
  • Electrode: 1.2mm plastic stylus, 15 stainless steel 3mm wide contacts attached at 3mm intervals.
  • Implanted in the anterior medial amygdala.
  • The receiver-stimulator which is carried by the subject, measures 3.7cm x 3.0cm x 1.4cm, and weighs 20g. The solid-state circuitry is encapsulated in epoxy resin which provides it with very good mechanical strength and makes it waterproof. Space for the 7-volt Mercury battery is included in the size mentioned above.
  • 3 channels stim, individual pulse intensity, same pulse duration and repetition for all 3 channels.
    • Operating range 100ft.
    • max current 2uA.
  • 216Mhz IRIG EEG transimtter, FM modulated.
    • The size of the three-channel unit, including the battery, is 4.5cm x 4.5cm x 1.5cm, and it weighs 50g.
    • Input-referred noise: 5uV.
  • Remarkable: one cerebral contact could be shared by recording and stimulating units. (2MOhm input impedance in the EEG amps)
  • Radio stimulation of different points in the amygdala and hippocampus in the four patients produced a variety of effects including pleasant sensations, elation, deep, thoughtful, concentration, odd feelings , super relaxation, colored visions, and other responses.
  • Extensive information has been published about different systems for radio telemetry in biological studies (Barwick & Fullagar, 1967; Caceres, 1965; Geddes, 1962; Slater, 1963). The disparity between the large number of technical papers and the few reports of results indicates the existence of methodological problems.
    • Recall that cardiac pacemakers were by this time in common use.

____References____

[0] Delgado JM, Mark V, Sweet W, Ervin F, Weiss G, Bach-Y-Rita G, Hagiwara R, Intracerebral radio stimulation and recording in completely free patients.J Nerv Ment Dis 147:4, 329-40 (1968 Oct)

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ref: delgado-0 tags: Delgado roborat ICMS stimulation control date: 12-16-2011 06:41 gmt revision:2 [1] [0] [head]

quote:

All the loose speculation provoked by roborats is ironic considering that the experiment is just a small-scale replay of a major media event that is 40 years old. In 1964, José Delgado, a neuroscientist from Yale University, stood in a Spanish bullring as a bull with a radio-equipped array of electrodes, or "stimoceiver," implanted in its brain charged toward him. When Delgado pushed a button on a radio transmitter he was holding, the bull stopped in its tracks. Delgado pushed another button, and the bull obediently turned to the right and trotted away. The New York Times hailed the event as "probably the most spectacular demonstration ever performed of the deliberate modification of animal behavior through external control of the brain."

from: http://discovermagazine.com/2004/oct/cover

from: http://www.angelfire.com/or/mctrl/chap16.htm

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ref: bookmark-0 tags: Delgado Bulls microstimulation ICMS control implant date: 01-06-2008 18:05 gmt revision:2 [1] [0] [head]

http://www.biotele.com/Delgado.htm

  • stimulated the caudate to stop the charging bull.
  • interesting account of the later part of his life spent in Spain, when his popularity wained
  • Delgado still appears to have some quite radical tendencies, such as belief in the inexorable advance of technology, even if it is immoral/unethical.