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[0] Wahnoun R, Helms Tillery S, He J, Neuron selection and visual training for population vector based cortical control.Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 6no Issue 4607-10 (2004)[1] Wahnoun R, He J, Helms Tillery SI, Selection and parameterization of cortical neurons for neuroprosthetic control.J Neural Eng 3:2, 162-71 (2006 Jun)[2] Fetz EE, Operant conditioning of cortical unit activity.Science 163:870, 955-8 (1969 Feb 28)[3] Fetz EE, Finocchio DV, Operant conditioning of specific patterns of neural and muscular activity.Science 174:7, 431-5 (1971 Oct 22)[4] Fetz EE, Finocchio DV, Operant conditioning of isolated activity in specific muscles and precentral cells.Brain Res 40:1, 19-23 (1972 May 12)[5] Fetz EE, Baker MA, Operantly conditioned patterns on precentral unit activity and correlated responses in adjacent cells and contralateral muscles.J Neurophysiol 36:2, 179-204 (1973 Mar)[6] Humphrey DR, Schmidt EM, Thompson WD, Predicting measures of motor performance from multiple cortical spike trains.Science 170:959, 758-62 (1970 Nov 13)

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ref: -0 tags: microstimulation rat cortex measurement ICMS spread date: 01-26-2017 02:52 gmt revision:0 [head]

PMID-12878710 Spatiotemporal effects of microstimulation in rat neocortex: a parametric study using multielectrode recordings.

  • Measure using extracellular ephys a spread of ~ 1.3mm from near-threshold microstimulation.
  • Study seems thorough despite limited techniques.

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ref: COLLIAS-1957.05 tags: histology microelectrode vasulature date: 01-23-2013 23:56 gmt revision:4 [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-13429398[0] Histopathological changes produced by implanted electrodes in cat brains; comparison with histopathological changes in human and experimental puncture wounds.

  • Quite a good and overcomplete / long article -- fully describes their result of implanting bundles of 0.005" varnished steel wires into the brains of cats.
    • Saw hemorrhagic necrosis, necrosis from edema, and eventual encapsulation and collapse of capilaries around the chronic implant. All things that we still have to contend with.
  • From [1]: ... For single penetrating electrodes into cat cortex, Collias and Manuelidis noted and increase in hemorrhagic damage near electrode tracks of the cortex nearest the point of electrode entry into the pia.
  • They also reported that the damage appeared to be randomly distributed among the implants, which they attributed to differences in local vasculature.
  • The toxicity of certain metals, namely, platinum, platinum-8% tungsten, platinum-10% rhodium, platinum-10% iridium, platinum-10% nickel, platinized platinum, a gold-nickel-chromium alloy, a gold-palladium-rhodium alloy, a chromium-nickel-molybdenum alloy (Vitallium), stainless steel, silver, rhenium, and gold, was evaluated histologically following chronic implantation for 2 months in the brains of cats. Of the above metals, all but silver were found to be nontoxic. Boron was also evaluated and found to be nontoxic.

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[0] COLLIAS JC, MANUELIDIS EE, Histopathological changes produced by implanted electrodes in cat brains; comparison with histopathological changes in human and experimental puncture wounds.J Neurosurg 14:3, 302-28 (1957 May)
[1] Rousche PJ, Normann RA, Chronic recording capability of the Utah Intracortical Electrode Array in cat sensory cortex.J Neurosci Methods 82:1, 1-15 (1998 Jul 1)

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ref: notes-0 tags: DNA transfection yasuda experiment8 date: 03-17-2008 20:11 gmt revision:2 [1] [0] [head]

"

dishdnanameconc ug/ululug
1HM8-46His-mGFP-stop-C1-20.140.70.1
2HM8-46His-mGFP-stop-C1-20.143.60.5
5HM8-46His-mGFP-stop-C1-20.140.70.1
"HM8-47His-mCherry-stop-C10.120.830.1
6HM8-46His-mGFP-stop-C1-20.143.60.5
"HM8-47His-mCherry-stop-C10.120.830.1
7HM8-46His-mGFP-stop-C1-20.140.70.1
"HM8-47His-mCherry-stop-C10.124.20.5
8HM8-46His-mGFP-stop-C1-20.143.60.5
"HM8-47His-mCherry-stop-C10.124.20.5

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ref: Wahnoun-2004.01 tags: BMI population_vector neural selection Brown 3D arizona ASU date: 04-06-2007 23:28 gmt revision:3 [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-17271333[0] Neuron selection and visual training for population vector based cortical control.

  • M1 and Pmd (not visual areas), bilateral.
  • a series of experiments designed to parameterize a cortical control algorithm without an animal having to move its arm.
  • a highly motivated animal observes as the computer drives a cursor move towards a set of targets once each in a center-out task.
    • how motivated? how did they do this? (primate working for its daily water rations)
  • I do not think this is the way to go. it is better to stimulate in the proper afferents and let the brain learn the control algorithm, the same as when a baby learns to crawl.
    • however, the method described here may be a good way to bootstrap., definitely.
  • want to generate an algorithm that 'tunes-up' control with a few tens of neurons, not hundreds as Miguel estimates.
  • estimate the tuning from 12 seconds of visual following (1.5 seconds per each of the 8 corners of a cube)
  • optimize over the subset of neurons (by dropping them) & computing the individual residual error.
  • their paper seems to be more of an analysis of this neuron-removal method.
  • neurons seem to maintain their tuning between visual following and brain-control.
  • they never actually did brain control

PMID-16705272[1] Selection and parameterization of cortical neurons for neuroprosthetic control

  • here they actually did neuroprosthetic control.
  • most units add noise to the control signal, a few actually improve it -> they emphasize cautious unit selection leaning to simpler computational/electrical systems.
  • point out that the idea of using chronically recorded neural signals has a very long history.. [2,3,4,5] [6] etc.
  • look like it took the monkeys about 1.6-1.8 seconds to reach the target.
    • minimum summed path length / distance to target = 3.5. is that good?

____References____