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[0] Carmena JM, Lebedev MA, Henriquez CS, Nicolelis MA, Stable ensemble performance with single-neuron variability during reaching movements in primates.J Neurosci 25:46, 10712-6 (2005 Nov 16)

[0] Boline J, Ashe J, On the relations between single cell activity in the motor cortex and the direction and magnitude of three-dimensional dynamic isometric force.Exp Brain Res 167:2, 148-59 (2005 Nov)

[0] Lavin A, Nogueira L, Lapish CC, Wightman RM, Phillips PE, Seamans JK, Mesocortical dopamine neurons operate in distinct temporal domains using multimodal signaling.J Neurosci 25:20, 5013-23 (2005 May 18)[1] Pirot S, Godbout R, Mantz J, Tassin JP, Glowinski J, Thierry AM, Inhibitory effects of ventral tegmental area stimulation on the activity of prefrontal cortical neurons: evidence for the involvement of both dopaminergic and GABAergic components.Neuroscience 49:4, 857-65 (1992 Aug)

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ref: -0 tags: polyimide anodic release 2005 date: 06-16-2014 23:58 gmt revision:1 [0] [head]

IEEE-1416914 (pdf) Partial release and detachment of microfabricated metal and polymer structures by anodic metal dissolution

  • recommend 100nm Cr/Al release layer.
  • finished devices just 'float to the surface' of saline solution.

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ref: Polikov-2005.1 tags: neural response glia histology immune electrodes recording 2005 Tresco Michigan microglia date: 01-29-2013 00:34 gmt revision:10 [9] [8] [7] [6] [5] [4] [head]

PMID-16198003[0] Response of brain tissue to chronically implanted neural electrodes

  • Good review (the kind where figures are taken from other papers). Nothing terribly new (upon a very cursory inspection)
  • When CNS damage severs blood vessels, microglia are indistinguishable from the blood borne, monocyte-derived macrophages that are recruited by the degranulation of platelets and the cellular release of cytokines.
  • Furthermore, microglia are known to secrete, either constitutively, or in response to pathological stimuli, neurotrophic factors that aid in neuronal survival and growth.
    • Also release cytotoxic and neurotoxic factors that can lead to neuronal death in vitro.
    • It has been suggested that the presence of insoluble materials in the brain may lead to a state of 'frustrated phagocytosis' or inability of the macrophages to remove the foreign body, resulting in persistent release of neurotoxic substances.
  • When a 10x10 array of silicon probes was implanted in feline cortex, 60% of the needle tracks showed evidence of hemorrhage and 25% showed edema upon explantation of the probes after one day (Schmidt et al 1993) {1163}
    • Although a large number of the tracks were affected, only 3-5% of the area was actually covered by hemorrhages and edema, suggesting the actual damage to blood vessels may have been relatively minor. (!!)
  • Excess fluid and cellular debris diminishes 6-8 days due to the action of activated microglia and re-absorption.
  • As testament to the transitory nature of this mechanically induced wound healing response, electrode tracks could not be found in animals after several months when the electrode was inerted and quickly removed (Yuen and Agnew 1995, Rousche et al 2001; Csicsvari et al 2003, Biran et al 2005).
  • Biran et al 2005: observed persistent ED-1 immunoreactivity around silicon microelectrode arrays implanted in rat cortex at 2 and 4 weeks following implantation; not seen in microelectrode stab wound controls.
  • On the glial scar:
    • observed in the CNS of all vertebrates, presumably to isolate damaged parts of the nervous system and maintain the integrity of the blood-brain barrier.
    • mostly composed of reactive astrocytes.
    • presumably the glial scar insulates electrodes from nearby neurons, hindering diffusion and increasing impedance.
  • On the meninges:
    • Meningeal fibroblasts, which also stain for vimentin, but not for GFAP, may migrate down the electrode shaft from the brain surface and form the early basis for the glial scar.
  • On recording quality:
    • Histological examination upon explantation revealed that every electrode with stable unit recordings had at least one large neuron near the electrode tip, while every electrode that was not able to record resolvable action potentials was explanted from a site with no large neurons nearby.
  • Perhaps the clearest example of this variability was observed in the in vivo response to plastic “mock electrodes” implanted in rabbit brain by Stensaas and Stensaas (1976) {1210} and explanted over the course of 2 years. They separated the response into three types: Type 1 was characterized by little to no gliosis with neurons adjacent to the implant, Type 2 had a reactive astrocyte zone, and Type 3 exhibited a layer of connective tissue between the reactive astrocyte layer and the implant, with neurons pushed more than 100 um away. All three responses are well documented in the literature; however this study found that the model electrodes produced all three types of reactions simultaneously,depending on where along the electrode one looked.

____References____

[0] Polikov VS, Tresco PA, Reichert WM, Response of brain tissue to chronically implanted neural electrodes.J Neurosci Methods 148:1, 1-18 (2005 Oct 15)

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ref: Song-2005.06 tags: recording wireless silicon utah probe Donoghue 2005 date: 01-08-2012 23:24 gmt revision:3 [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-16003903[0] Development of a chipscale integrated microelectrode/microelectronic device for brain implantable neuroengineering applications.

-- second from this

  • They have mated a 16-channel silicon microprobe to a low-power (50uW/channel) VLSI chip, including a CMOS amplifier.
    • Epoxy ball-bond.
    • 7mW total power.
  • Suggest photovoltaic power using GaAs/AlGaAs photodiodes. 3 in series yielding 3V at about 20% efficiency. Not bad! Then they can use the fiber to get data out, too.

____References____

[0] Song YK, Patterson WR, Bull CW, Beals J, Hwang N, Deangelis AP, Lay C, McKay JL, Nurmikko AV, Fellows MR, Simeral JD, Donoghue JP, Connors BW, Development of a chipscale integrated microelectrode/microelectronic device for brain implantable neuroengineering applications.IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng 13:2, 220-6 (2005 Jun)

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ref: Carmena-2005.11 tags: carmena BMI nicolelis single-unit variability 2005 date: 01-01-2012 17:31 gmt revision:2 [1] [0] [head]

PMID-16291944[0] Stable ensemble performance with single-neuron variability during reaching movements in primates.

  • correlation between the firing of single neurons and movement parameters was nonstationary over 30-60 minute recording sessions.
  • yet! you could get stable prediction of arm movements, suggesting that movement parameters are redundantly encoded.
  • this, in turn, implies that you do not need a stable recorded population for good predictions.
  • suggest that the variance itself could be a means of neuronal 'computation' or exploration based on perturbations.
    • later Carmena papers do not mention this.

____References____

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ref: Mavoori-2005.1 tags: Fetz ICMS stim wireless recording flash 2005 date: 12-16-2011 04:21 gmt revision:3 [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-16102841[0] An autonomous implantable computer for neural recording and stimulation in unrestrained primates.

  • Pretty basic: AFE + bandpass filter, 11.7ksps ADC, uC spike discriminator, microstimulator, IRDA link, 4Mbit flash (why so small? -- 2005).
  • Device could run for weeks at a time.
  • Used in his Hebbian learning task [1]

____References____

[0] Mavoori J, Jackson A, Diorio C, Fetz E, An autonomous implantable computer for neural recording and stimulation in unrestrained primates.J Neurosci Methods 148:1, 71-7 (2005 Oct 15)
[1] Jackson A, Mavoori J, Fetz EE, Long-term motor cortex plasticity induced by an electronic neural implant.Nature 444:7115, 56-60 (2006 Nov 2)

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ref: Boline-2005.11 tags: electrophysiology motor cortex force isometric Ashe 2005 date: 04-09-2007 22:39 gmt revision:3 [2] [1] [0] [head]

this seems to be the same as {339}, with a different pubmed id & different author list. bug in the system!

PMID-16193273[0] On the relations between single cell activity in the motor cortex and the direction and magnitude of three-dimensional dynamic isometric force* the majority of cells responded to direction

  • few to the magnitude,
  • and ~10% to the direction & magnitude
  • control of static and dynamic motor systems is based on a common control process!
  • 2d task, monkeys, single-unit recording, regression analysis.

____References____

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ref: Lavin-2005.05 tags: dopamine PFC VTA prefrontal_cortex ventral_tegmentum 2005 date: 02-05-2007 20:37 gmt revision:1 [0] [head]

PMID-15901782[0]Mesocortical Dopamine Neurons Operate in Distinct Temporal Domains Using Multimodal Signaling

  • good paper, decent review of relevant infos in the introduction.
  • they suggest that the mesocortical system transmits fast signals about reward/salience via corelease of glutamate, whereas dopamine provides a more long-term modulator of cortical processing dynamics.
  • the ventral tegmental area provides dopamine to the prefrontal cortex.
  • DA levels in the PFC can increase ~10x above baseline for 10's of minutes.
    • these responses occur to both to unexpectedly rewarding stimuli as well as to aversive stimuli.
  • brief VTA stimulation invokes a short, transient (~200ms) inhibition of PFC in vivo, and this inhibition is typically blocked by DA antagonists. from: PMID-1436485[1]
    • transient inhibition begins ~20ms after VTA stimulation, which is barely enough time for activation of ionotropic receptors, let alone metabotropic DA receptors.
  • MFB stimulation evoked increased DA levels and an elevation in firing of nearby striatal neurons that outlasted the period of stimulation by > 300s.
  • strangely, the excitatory glutamergic response in the PFC to VTA stimulation is blocked by lesion of the MFB.
  • in suppport of co-release, TH-positive neurons in rats and primates are co-reactive for glutamate.
    • DA neurons can form glutamate synapses in vitro.
  • check it out:
    • midbrain DA neurons respond by firing a ~200ms burst of spikes to primary rewards, conditioned, or secondary rewards, rewards that are not predicted, and novel or unexpected stimuli.
    • DA neurons are activated by rewarding events that are better than predicted, remain unaffected by events that are as good as predicted, and are depressed by events that are worse than predicted (yet they do not cite any refs for this... there are a bunch of refs in the prev sentence. ) see:
    • stress can also increase PFC DA

____References____