m8ta
You are not authenticated, login.
text: sort by
tags: modified
type: chronology
{88}
hide / / print
ref: Fellows-2006.04 tags: parkinsons subthalamic nucleus thalamus DBS STN force velocity overshoot grasp date: 02-22-2012 14:51 gmt revision:9 [8] [7] [6] [5] [4] [3] [head]

PMID-16549385[0] The effect of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation on precision grip abnormalities in Parkinson's disease

  • Deep Brain stimulation improves mobility/dexterity and dyskinesia of patients in general, via an increase in rate and decrease in reaction time, but it does not let the patient match force output to the object being manipulated (that is, the force is too large).
  • The excessive levels of grip force present in the stimulation 'off' state, and present from the early stages of the disease, however, were even more marked with STN stimulation on.
    • STN DBS may worsen the ability to match force characteristics to task requirements. (position control is improved?).
    • quite fascinating.

See also PMID-19266149[1] Distal and proximal prehension is differentially affected by Parkinson‘s disease The effect of conscious and subconscious load cues

  • asked PD and control patients to lift heavy and light objects.
  • While controls were able to normalize lift velocity with the help of both conscious and subconscious load cues, the PD patients could use neither form of cue, and retained a pathological overshoot in lift velocity.
  • Hence force control is remarkably affected in PD, which is consistent with the piper rhythm being absent / usually present for isometric contraction.

____References____

[0] Fellows SJ, Kronenbürger M, Allert N, Coenen VA, Fromm C, Noth J, Weiss PH, The effect of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation on precision grip abnormalities in Parkinson's disease.Parkinsonism Relat Disord 12:3, 149-54 (2006 Apr)
[1] Weiss PH, Dafotakis M, Metten L, Noth J, Distal and proximal prehension is differentially affected by Parkinson's disease. The effect of conscious and subconscious load cues.J Neurol 256:3, 450-6 (2009 Mar)