m8ta
you are not logged in, login. new entry
text: sort by
tags: modified
type: chronology
{1404}
hide / edit[1] / print
ref: -0 tags: tissue response indwelling implants dialysis kozai date: 04-04-2018 00:28 gmt revision:1 [0] [head]

PMID-25546652 Brain Tissue Responses to Neural Implants Impact Signal Sensitivity and Intervention Strategies

  • (Interesting): eight identical electrode arrays implanted into the same region of different animals have shown that half the arrays continue to record neural signals for >14 weeks while in the other half of the arrays, single-unit yield rapidly degraded and ultimately failed over the same timescale.
  • In another study, aimed at uncovering the time course of insertion-related bleeding and coagulation, electrodes were implanted into the cortex of rats at varying time intervals (−120, −90, −60, −30, −15, and 0 min) using a micromanipulator and linear motor with an insertion speed of 2 mm/s.40 The results showed dramatic variability in BBB leakage that washed out any trend (Figure 3), suggesting that a separate underlying cause was responsible for the large inter- and intra-animal variability.

{1362}
hide / edit[0] / print
ref: -0 tags: serial electron microscopy Lichtman reconstruction nervous tissue date: 01-17-2017 23:32 gmt revision:0 [head]

PMID-26232230 Saturated Reconstruction of a Volume of Neocortex.

  • Data presented at Cell "Big Questions in Neuroscience", perhaps the most impressive of the talks.

{1347}
hide / edit[0] / print
ref: -0 tags: laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for surgery tissue differentiation date: 09-22-2016 19:26 gmt revision:0 [head]

PMID-25426327 Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for bone and cartilage differentiation - ex vivo study as a prospect for a laser surgery feedback mechanism.

  • Mehari F1, Rohde M2, Knipfer C2, Kanawade R1, Klämpfl F1, Adler W3, Stelzle F4, Schmidt M1.
  • Tested on pig ear cartilage & cortical bone.
  • 532nm, Q-switched, flashlamp-pumped Nd:YAG, 80mJ pulse energy, 10ns, 1Hz.
  • Commercial spectrogram; light collected with 50um fiber optic connector.
    • We could probably put this in line with the laser mirrors, probably..
  • Super clean results: see any of the figures.
    • AUC = 1.00 !!

{875}
hide / edit[14] / print
ref: Cosman-2005.12 tags: microstimulation RF pain neural tissue ICMS date: 09-04-2014 18:10 gmt revision:14 [13] [12] [11] [10] [9] [8] [head]

One of the goals/needs of the lab is to be able to stimluate and record nervous tissue at the same time. We do not have immediate access to optogenetic methods, but what about lower frequency EM stimulation? The idea: if you put the stimulation frequency outside the recording system bandwidth, there is no need to switch, and indeed no reason you can't stimulate and record at the same time.

Hence, I very briefly checked for the effects of RF stimulation on nervous tissue.

  • PMID-16336478[0] Electric and Thermal Field Effects in Tissue Around Radiofrequency Electrodes
    • Most clinical response to pulsed RF is heat ablation - the RF pulses can generate 'hot spots' c.f. continuous RF.
    • Secondary effect may be electroporation; this is not extensively investigation.
    • Suggests that 500kHz pulses can be 'rectified' by the membrane, and hence induce sodium influx, hence neuron activation.
    • They propose that some of the clinical effects of pulsed RF stimulation is mediated through LTD response.
  • {1297} -- original!
  • PMID-14206843[2] Electrical Stimulation of Excitable Tissue by Radio-Frequency Transmission
    • Actually not so interesting -- deals with RF powered pacemakers and bladder stimulators; both which include rectification.
  • Pulsed and Continous Radiofrequency Current Adjacent to the Cervical Dorsal Root Ganglion of the Rat Induces Late Cellular Activity in the Dorsal Horn
    • shows that neurons are activated by pulsed RF, albeit through c-Fos staining. Electrodes were much larger in this study.
    • Also see PMID-15618777[3] associated editorial which calls for more extensive clinical, controlled testing. The editorial gives some very interesting personal details - scientists from the former Soviet bloc!
  • PMID-16310722[4] Pulsed radiofrequency applied to dorsal root ganglia causes a selective increase in ATF3 in small neurons.
    • used 20ms pulses of 500kHz.
    • Small diameter fibers are differentially activated.
    • Pulsed RF induces activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3), which has been used as an indicator of cellular stress in a variety of tissues.
    • However, there were no particular signs of axonal damage; hence the clinically effective analgesia may be reflective of a decrease in cell activity, synaptic release (or general cell health?)
    • Implies that RF may be dangerous below levels that cause tissue heating.
  • Cellphone Radiation Increases Brain Activity
    • Implies that Rf energy - here presumably in 800-900Mhz or 1800-1900Mhz - is capable of exciting nervous tissue without electroporation.
  • Random idea: I wonder if it is possible to get a more active signal out of an electrode by stimulating with RF? (simultaneously?)
  • Human auditory perception of pulsed radiofrequency energy
    • Evicence seems to support the theory that it is local slight heating -- 6e-5 C -- that creates pressure waves which can be heard by humans, guinea pigs, etc.
    • Unlikely to be direct neural stimulation.
    • High frequency hearing is required for this
      • Perhaps because it is lower harmonics of thead resonance that are heard (??).

Conclusion: worth a shot, especially given the paper by Alberts et al 1972.

  • There should be a frequency that sodium channels react to, without inducing cellular stress.
  • Must be very careful to not heat the tissue - need a power controlled RF stimulator
    • The studies above seem to work with voltage-control (?!)

____References____

[0] Cosman ER Jr, Cosman ER Sr, Electric and thermal field effects in tissue around radiofrequency electrodes.Pain Med 6:6, 405-24 (2005 Nov-Dec)
[1] Alberts WW, Wright EW Jr, Feinstein B, Gleason CA, Sensory responses elicited by subcortical high frequency electrical stimulation in man.J Neurosurg 36:1, 80-2 (1972 Jan)
[2] GLENN WW, HAGEMAN JH, MAURO A, EISENBERG L, FLANIGAN S, HARVARD M, ELECTRICAL STIMULATION OF EXCITABLE TISSUE BY RADIO-FREQUENCY TRANSMISSION.Ann Surg 160no Issue 338-50 (1964 Sep)
[3] Richebé P, Rathmell JP, Brennan TJ, Immediate early genes after pulsed radiofrequency treatment: neurobiology in need of clinical trials.Anesthesiology 102:1, 1-3 (2005 Jan)
[4] Hamann W, Abou-Sherif S, Thompson S, Hall S, Pulsed radiofrequency applied to dorsal root ganglia causes a selective increase in ATF3 in small neurons.Eur J Pain 10:2, 171-6 (2006 Feb)

{748}
hide / edit[4] / print
ref: Leung-2008.08 tags: biocompatibility alginate tissue response immunochemistry microglia insulation spin coating Tresco recording histology MEA date: 01-28-2013 21:19 gmt revision:4 [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-18485471[0] Characterization of microglial attachment and cytokine release on biomaterials of differing surface chemistry

  • The important result is that materials with low protein-binding (e.g. alginate) have fewer bound microglia, hence better biocompatibility. It also seems to help if the material is highly hydrophilic.
    • Yes alginate is made from algae.
  • Used Michigan probes for implantation.
  • ED1 = pan-macrophage marker.
    • (quote:) Quantification of cells on the surface indicated that the number of adherent microglia appeared higher on the smooth side of the electrode compared to the grooved, recording site side (Fig. 2B), and declined with time. However, at no point were electrodes completely free of attached and activated microglial cells nor did these cells disappear from the interfacial zone along the electrode tract.
    • but these were not coated with anything new .. ???

____References____

[0] Leung BK, Biran R, Underwood CJ, Tresco PA, Characterization of microglial attachment and cytokine release on biomaterials of differing surface chemistry.Biomaterials 29:23, 3289-97 (2008 Aug)

{1217}
hide / edit[3] / print
ref: Bjornsson-2006.09 tags: micro vasculature histology insertion speed tissue shear date: 01-28-2013 03:38 gmt revision:3 [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-16921203[0] Effects of insertion conditions on tissue strain and vascular damage during neuroprosthetic device insertion.

  • We have developed an ex vivo preparation to capture real-time images of tissue deformation during device insertion using thick tissue slices from rat brains prepared with fluorescently labeled vasculature.
  • Direct damage to the vasculature included severing, rupturing and dragging, and was often observed several hundred micrometers from the insertion site. (yikes!)
  • Advocate faster insertion of sharp devices. (tatoo needle?).
  • Cortical surface features greatly affected insertion success; insertions attempted through pial blood vessels resulted in severe tissue compression.
    • Thus, avoiding vasculature is useful not only for avoiding hemorrhaging, but also to prevent excessive tissue compression.
  • High degree of variability
    • Indicates that this should be measured! Scientifically interesting!
  • Insertion speeds:
    • Fast 2 mm/sec
    • Medium 500 um/sec
    • Slow 125 um/sec
  • Perhaps there is no need to experiment with multiple insertion speeds?

____References____

[0] Bjornsson CS, Oh SJ, Al-Kofahi YA, Lim YJ, Smith KL, Turner JN, De S, Roysam B, Shain W, Kim SJ, Effects of insertion conditions on tissue strain and vascular damage during neuroprosthetic device insertion.J Neural Eng 3:3, 196-207 (2006 Sep)

{736}
hide / edit[7] / print
ref: Liu-1999.09 tags: electrodes recording tissue response MEA histology date: 01-28-2013 00:24 gmt revision:7 [6] [5] [4] [3] [2] [1] [head]

PMID-10498377[0] Stability of the interface between neural tissue and chronically implanted intracortical microelectrodes.

  • implanted 7-shaft 35um iridium electrodes into the pericruciate gyrus of cats & measured the stability of recordings over several months.
  • electrodes were floating, under the dura; they note that connective tissue can force these floating arrays out of the brain, in further, or can encapsulate the electrodes.
    • electrodes activated by 'potentiodynamic cycling' to remove the insulation from the tip, I guess.
    • Insulation is epoxylite epoxy (5-10um thick) which is baked for curing and degassing at 100 and 170C each for 30 minutes.
    • more information on their fabrication in {1105}
  • Used the now-standard techniques for recording & analysis - amazing that this was all very new 10 years ago!
  • Measure stability not only on waveform shape (which will change as the position of the electrode relative to the neuron changes) but also neural tuning.
  • Lymphocytes were found to accumulate around the tips of the microstimulated sites.
  • Electrode sites that yielded recordings ('active') were all clean, with large neurons near the end, and with minimal connective tissue sheath (2-8 um; distance to nearby neurons was 30-50um).
    • Longest period for an active electrode was 242 days.
    • Electrode impedance was usually between 50 and 75 kOhm; there was no insulation failure.
  • Electrodes were stable even when the cat vigorously shook it's head in response to water placed on the head (!).
  • Electrodes were very unstable the first 2 weeks - 1 month ; rather stable thereafter.
    • Active electrodes tended to remain active ; inactive electrodes tended to remain inactive.

____References____

[0] Liu X, McCreery DB, Carter RR, Bullara LA, Yuen TG, Agnew WF, Stability of the interface between neural tissue and chronically implanted intracortical microelectrodes.IEEE Trans Rehabil Eng 7:3, 315-26 (1999 Sep)
[1] Bullara LA, McCreery DB, Yuen TG, Agnew WF, A microelectrode for delivery of defined charge densities.J Neurosci Methods 9:1, 15-21 (1983 Sep)

{1026}
hide / edit[5] / print
ref: Thelin-2011.01 tags: histology MEA tether tissue response malmo lund date: 01-24-2013 22:17 gmt revision:5 [4] [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-21298109[0] Implant size and fixation mode strongly influence tissue reactions in the CNS.

  • Overview: tethering and size both increase immune response, and causes continued GFAP activity.
    • An untethered 50um electrode exhibited very weak inflammatory response after 12 weeks.
      • Suggesting that a small electrode can move with the brain.
  • Tethering in their context means affixed rigidly to the bone.
    • Small-diameter, untethered implants cause the smallest tissue reactions.
    • Likely that this scales.
  • Stice et al 2007 {1111} -- GFAP expression was significantly smaller for 12 um diameter implants than 25um implants @ 4 weeks.
  • They used 50um and 200um stainless steel implants.
    • implants glued to micromanipulator using gelatine
  • 24 rats.
  • Much more GFAP and ED1 actviity in tethered implants; NEuN neural density about the same.
  • 50um implant had a higher NeuN + count.
  • Regarding implantation: not sure. Have to find a reference for stab wounds (where the inserter is retracted).

____References____

[0] Thelin J, Jörntell H, Psouni E, Garwicz M, Schouenborg J, Danielsen N, Linsmeier CE, Implant size and fixation mode strongly influence tissue reactions in the CNS.PLoS One 6:1, e16267 (2011 Jan 26)

{737}
hide / edit[5] / print
ref: Biran-2005.09 tags: microelectrode Michigan probe glia tissue response electrode immune histology MEA Biran date: 01-24-2013 20:49 gmt revision:5 [4] [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-16045910[0] Neuronal cell loss accompanies the brain tissue response to chronically implanted silicon microelectrode arrays.

  • See also {1190} (wow, I'm redundant!)
  • Important point: ED1 up-regulation and neuronal loss were not observed in microelectrode stab controls, indicating that the phenotype did not result from the initial mechanical trauma of electrode implantation, but was associated with the foreign body response.
    • CD68 = ED1 is a marker for microglia and other macrophages. (wikipedia article is informative).
    • GFAP = glial fibrillary acidic protein, marker for astrocytes.
  • Recording failure is caused by chronic inflammation (mostly activated microglia) at the microelectrode brain tissue interface.
  • Only tested response 2 and 4 weeks after implantation. Makes sense for stab wound, but didn't the want to see a longer term response? Or do their electrodes just not last that long?
  • What did they coat the silicon probes in?
  • Used silastic to shock-mount their floating electrodes, but this apparently made no difference compared to conventional dental cement and bone screw mounting.
  • Suggest that chronic inflammatory response may be related to the absorption of fibrogen and complement to the surface of the device (device should not be porous?), the subsequent release of pro-inflammatory and cytotoxic cytokines by activated microphages, and the persistence of activated macrophages around materials which cannot be broken down.
    • Well then, how do you make the electrodes biochemically / biologically 'invisible'?
    • Persistently activated microglia are found around insoluble plaques in AD (plaques that cannot be / are not removed from the brain via proteolysis. Microglia form 'glitter cells' when they engulf undigestible stubstances). This has been termed 'frustrated phagocytosis', which results in increased secretion of proinflamatory cytokines that directly or indirectly cause neuronal death.
  • Significant reductions in neurofiliament reactivity was seen up to 230um from the microelectrode interface; this was not seen for stab wounds. Maximum recording distance is about 130um; 100um more reasonable in normal conditions.
  • Accumulating evidence from postmortem analysis of patients implanted with DBS electrodes reveals that chronic neuroinflamation is part of the response to such (duller, larger) implants as well. They have seen cell loss up to 1mm fromt the electrode surface here.

____References____

[0] Biran R, Martin DC, Tresco PA, Neuronal cell loss accompanies the brain tissue response to chronically implanted silicon microelectrode arrays.Exp Neurol 195:1, 115-26 (2005 Sep)

{1116}
hide / edit[4] / print
ref: Snow-2006.02 tags: electrode insertion sharp recording tissue surrogate date: 02-10-2012 18:56 gmt revision:4 [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

IEEE-1580838 (pdf) Microfabricated cylindrical multielectrodes for neural stimulation.

  • Used optical fiber as the substrate.
  • sharpened using a Dicing saw.
  • polymide insulatino removed by placing fiber tip next to a white-hot platinum filament.
  • cylindrical lithography system using a He-Cd laser.
  • tissue surrogate: two layers of 20um Saran Wrap over tofu. (!!!) -- see also {212}

____References____

Snow, S. and Jacobsen, S.C. and Wells, D.L. and Horch, K.W. Microfabricated cylindrical multielectrodes for neural stimulation Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on 53 2 320 -326 (2006)

{401}
hide / edit[2] / print
ref: bookmark-0 tags: RF penetration tissue 1978 date: 07-24-2007 04:15 gmt revision:2 [1] [0] [head]

http://hardm.ath.cx:88/pdf/RFpenetrationInTissue.pdf

  • from the perspective of NMR imaging.
  • gives the penetration depths & phase-shifts for RF waves from 1 - 100Mhz. I can obly assume that it is much worse for 400Mhz and 2.4Ghz.
    • that said, Zarlink's MICS transceiver works from the GI tract at 400mhz with low power, suggesting that the attenuation can't be too too great.
  • includes equations used to derive these figures.
  • document describing how various antenna types are effected by biological tissue, e.g. a human head.

even more interesting: wireless brain machine interface