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[0] Schmidt EM, McIntosh JS, Durelli L, Bak MJ, Fine control of operantly conditioned firing patterns of cortical neurons.Exp Neurol 61:2, 349-69 (1978 Sep 1)[1] Serruya MD, Hatsopoulos NG, Paninski L, Fellows MR, Donoghue JP, Instant neural control of a movement signal.Nature 416:6877, 141-2 (2002 Mar 14)[2] Fetz EE, Operant conditioning of cortical unit activity.Science 163:870, 955-8 (1969 Feb 28)[3] Fetz EE, Finocchio DV, Operant conditioning of specific patterns of neural and muscular activity.Science 174:7, 431-5 (1971 Oct 22)[4] Fetz EE, Finocchio DV, Operant conditioning of isolated activity in specific muscles and precentral cells.Brain Res 40:1, 19-23 (1972 May 12)[5] Fetz EE, Baker MA, Operantly conditioned patterns on precentral unit activity and correlated responses in adjacent cells and contralateral muscles.J Neurophysiol 36:2, 179-204 (1973 Mar)

[0] Fetz EE, Operant conditioning of cortical unit activity.Science 163:870, 955-8 (1969 Feb 28)[1] Fetz EE, Finocchio DV, Operant conditioning of specific patterns of neural and muscular activity.Science 174:7, 431-5 (1971 Oct 22)[2] Fetz EE, Finocchio DV, Operant conditioning of isolated activity in specific muscles and precentral cells.Brain Res 40:1, 19-23 (1972 May 12)

[0] BASMAJIAN JV, Control and training of individual motor units.Science 141no Issue 440-1 (1963 Aug 2)

[0] Humphrey DR, Schmidt EM, Thompson WD, Predicting measures of motor performance from multiple cortical spike trains.Science 170:959, 758-62 (1970 Nov 13)

[0] DeLong MR, Strick PL, Relation of basal ganglia, cerebellum, and motor cortex units to ramp and ballistic limb movements.Brain Res 71:2-3, 327-35 (1974 May 17)

[0] Pollak P, Benabid AL, Gross C, Gao DM, Laurent A, Benazzouz A, Hoffmann D, Gentil M, Perret J, [Effects of the stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus in Parkinson disease]Rev Neurol (Paris) 149:3, 175-6 (1993)

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ref: Schmidt-1978.09 tags: Schmidt BMI original operant conditioning cortex HOT pyramidal information antidromic date: 04-22-2013 18:21 gmt revision:10 [9] [8] [7] [6] [5] [4] [head]

PMID-101388[0] Fine control of operantly conditioned firing patterns of cortical neurons.

  • hand-arm area of M1, 11 or 12 chronic recording electrodes, 3 monkeys.
    • but, they only used one unit at a time in the conditioning task (i think)
  • conditioning in 77% of single units and 65% of combined units (multiunits?).
  • trained to move a handle to a position indicated by 8 annular cursor lights.
    • cursor was updated at 50hz -- this was just a series of lights! talk about simple feedback...
    • Investigated different smoothing: too fast, FR does not stay in target; too slow, cursor acquires target too slowly.
    • My gamma function is very similar to their lowpass filter used for smoothing the firing rates.
    • 4 or 8 target random tracking task
    • time out of 8 seconds
    • run of 40 trials
      • the conditioning reached a significant level of performance after 2.2 runs of 40 trials (in well-trained monkeys); typically, they did 18 runs/day.
  • recordings:
    • scalar mapping of unit firing rate to cursor position.
    • filtered 600-6kHz
    • each accepted spike triggered a generator that produced a pulse of of constant amplitude and width -> this was fed into a lowpass filter (1.5 to 2.5 & 3.5Hz cutoff), and a gain stage, then a ADC, then (presumably) the PDP.
      • can determine if these units were in the pyramidal tract by measuring antidromic delay (stimulate muscles??)
    • recorded one neuron for 108 days!!
      • neuronal activity is still being recorded from one monkey 24 months after chronic implantation of the microelectrodes.
    • average period in which conditioning was attempted was 3.12 days.
  • successful conditioning was always associated with specific repeatable limb movements
    • "However, what appears to be conditioned in these experiments is a movement, and the neuron under study is correlated with that movement." YES.
    • the monkeys clearly learned to make (increasingly refined) movement to modulate the firing activity of the recorded units.
    • the monkey learned to turn off certain units with specific limb positions; the monkey used exaggerated movements for these purposes.
      • e.g. finger and shoulder movements, isometric contraction in one case.
  • Trained some monkeys or > 15 months; animals got better at the task over time.
  • PDP-12 computer!
  • Information measure: 0 bits for missed targets, 2 for a 4 target task, 3 for 8 target task; information rate = total number of bits / time to acquire targets.
    • 3.85 bits/sec peak with 4 targets, 500ms hold time
    • with this, monkeys were able to exert fine control of firing rate.
    • damn! compare to Paninski! [1]
  • 4.29 bits/sec when the same task was performed with a manipulandum & wrist movement
  • they were able to condition 77% of individual neurons and 65% of combined units.
  • Implanted a pyramidal tract electrode in one monkey; both cells recorded at that time were pyramidal tract neurons, antidromic latencies of 1.2 - 1.3ms.
    • failures had no relation to over movements of the monkey.
  • Fetz and Baker [2,3,4,5] found that 65% of precentral neurons could be conditioned for increased or decreased firing rates.
    • and it only took 6.5 minutes, on average, for the units to change firing rates!
  • Summarized in [1].

____References____

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ref: -0 tags: microelectrodes original metal pipette glass recording MEA date: 01-31-2013 19:46 gmt revision:6 [5] [4] [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

IEEE-4065599 (pdf) Comments on Microelectrodes

  • The amplifiers themselves, even back in 1950's, posed no problems -- low bandwidth. All that is required is low noise and high input impedance.
  • KCl Glass electrodes are LPF (10M resistive + 10pf parasitic capacitance); metal HPF (capacitive).
    • The fluid tip will not see external triphasic spikes of vertebrate axons above the noise level.
  • Metal probe the most useful.
  • Pt electrode in CSF behaves like a capacitor at low voltage across a broad frequency range. CSF has compounds that retard oxidation; impedance is more resistive with physiological saline.
  • Noise voltage generated by a metal electrode best specified by equivalent noise resistance at room temperature, E rmsnoise=4kTR nδF R_n should equal the real part of the electrode impedance at the same frequency.
  • Much of electrochemistry: solid AgCl diffuses away from an electrode tip with great speed and can hardly be continuously formed with an imposed current. Silver forms extremely stable complexes with organic molecules having attached amino and sulfhydril groups which occur in plenty where the electrode damages the tissue. Finally, the reduction-oxidation potential of axoplasm is low enough to reduce methylene blue, which places it below hydrogen. AgCl and HgCl are reduced.
  • The external current of nerve fibers is the second derivative of the traveling spike, the familiar triphasic (??) transient.
  • Svaetichin [1] and Dowben and Rose [3] plated with Platinum black. This increases the surface area.
    • Very quickly it burns onto itself a shell of very adherent stuff. It is kept from intimate contact with the tissue around it by a shell.
    • We found that if we add gelatin to the chloroplatinic acid bath from which we plate the Pt, the ball is not only made adherent to the tip but is, in a sense, prepoisoned and does not burn a shell into itself.
  • glass insulation using woods metal (which melts at a very low temperature). Platinum ball was plated onto 2-3um pipette tip. 3um gelatinized platinum black ball, impedance 100kOhm at 1kHz.
    • Highly capacitive probe: can be biased to 1 volt by a polarizing current of 1e-10 amp. (0.1nA).
  • Getting KCl solution into 1um pipettes is quite hard! They advise vacuum boiling to remove the air bubbles.
  • Humble authors, informative paper.

____References____

' ''' ()

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ref: Salcman-1976.01 tags: Salcman electrodes recording chronic microelectrode array MEA original parylene date: 01-28-2013 22:18 gmt revision:8 [7] [6] [5] [4] [3] [2] [head]

PMID-1256090[0] A new chronic recording intracortical microelectrode

  • maintain that tethering is the rational way to go: it "re-establishes the normal biomechanics of the intact cranial vault". (Salcman 1972, 1973) {1010}
    • have model of electrode tip motion in response to brain-skull displacements (Goldstein and Salcman 1973) {1011}
      • Electrode would have a tip displacement of about 5um in response to a 1mm displacement of the electrode's point of entry into the skull.
      • Exponential dependence on recording amplitude and distance (Rall, 1962). Gradient: 7.5uv/um; movements of more than 1-2um can radically alter the recordnig shape.
      • Probably our electrodes work because the dura & gliosis becomes firmly attached to the electrode shafts.
    • not really an array so much as a number (10-12) of single-unit electrodes.
  • Details the process of parylene-C deposition, electrode microwelding, etc. Pretty cool stuff -- what has happened to this technology?
  • Each bubble is glued with cyanocrylate to the pia. (they too question the safety of this).
  • arrays can be manually inserted via forceps.
  • 25um iridium wire electroplated in 1-2um of gold
    • then electo-etched until the desired tip geometry is achieved, 1-3um diameter
    • and vacuum coated in 3um of parylene-C.
    • Impedance 1-2M with a 1kHz sine wave at 10nA. Impedance is inversely related to the frequency of the test current, phase angle of 70-80deg.
      • Ref Robinson, 1968.
    • We must emphasize the extreme sensitivity of electrode measurements to the test conditions. Measured values of Z e are usually increased 1-3M when the electrode has been stored away for a few days. Removing the electrode from the test bath for a few minutes in air can lead to equally large increases when the electrode is tested upon remersion. [...] might be oxide.
    • Pinholes are the usual failure mechanism (KD Wise 2004), {149}; parylene is 'pinhole-free'.
  • The connecting 25um Au lead is very flexible and imposes little stress on the iridium electrode.
    • Connecting wire coated in 12um of parylene C
    • Would prefer even finer wire, 12um.
  • Perspex window over the craniotomy; had a vent in this window which they could open.
  • Opening the vent would cause the brain to pulse, moving the electrodes through the cortex and changing neural activity.
  • Size of an electrode is limited by ability to introduce it into the brain.
    • Electrode must be introduced through the pia; as the pial vessels supply the cortex (or drain the cortex).
    • For their electrodes, P crit=0.9g ; the force necessary to penetrate the pia is 0.05 - 0.2g.
  • pure iridium is stiffer than Pt-Ir by a factor of 3 or so. (521 G N/m^2 = 521 GPa, higher than tungsten, which is 400 Gpa)
    • Pure iridium is apparently the stiffest metallic element ref
  • Interesting: "Once again we are impressed by the fact that passive recording electrodes exhibit drops in impedance in the living system which they never show on in vitro testing in protein solutions at 37C.
    • Between 40 and 50 days, a slow downward trend becomes noticeable; this trend continues for the life of the animal and asymptotically approaches values below 500k. Electrodes still record.
    • See {999}
    • Surmise that pure iridium electrodes have a different metal-electrolyte interface than more conventional metals (Pl and W).
  • Mention that the ultimate purpose is for a neural prosthesis.
    • Their then use was for recordings from M1 in monkeys and V1 from cats. (Schmidt, Bak, McIntosh 1974)
  • Ref Wise et al {1012}.

____References____

[0] Salcman M, Bak MJ, A new chronic recording intracortical microelectrode.Med Biol Eng 14:1, 42-50 (1976 Jan)

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ref: Kawano-2010.03 tags: mEA recording VLS silicon original date: 01-15-2012 22:11 gmt revision:3 [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-20089393[0] Electrical interfacing between neurons and electronics via vertically integrated sub-4 microm-diameter silicon probe arrays fabricated by vapor-liquid-solid growth.

  • The probe arrays can be fabricated on a silicon (1 1 1) substrate by selective VLS growth using catalytic-gold (Au) dots and a disilane (Si2H6) gas source, allowing precise control of probe position, diameter and length, as well as on-chip interconnections/integrated circuits (ICs) ( [Wagner and Ellis, 1964], [Ishida et al., 1999] and [Kawano et al., 2002])
  • maximum length 120 um (or so)

____References____

[0] Kawano T, Harimoto T, Ishihara A, Takei K, Kawashima T, Usui S, Ishida M, Electrical interfacing between neurons and electronics via vertically integrated sub-4 microm-diameter silicon probe arrays fabricated by vapor-liquid-solid growth.Biosens Bioelectron 25:7, 1809-15 (2010 Mar 15)

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ref: Holleman-2007.08 tags: amplifier recording NEF low noise original date: 01-15-2012 22:08 gmt revision:1 [0] [head]

IEEE-4353193 (pdf) A Sub-Microwatt Low-Noise Amplifier for Neural Recording

  • 0.805 uA from a 1V supply, gain of 36dB and 44db.
  • open loop amplfier, pass band between 0.3 and 4.7 kHz.
  • 3.5 uV rms input referred noise.
  • NEF 1.8

____References____

Holleman, J. and Otis, B. Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 2007. EMBS 2007. 29th Annual International Conference of the IEEE 3930 -3933 (2007)

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ref: Vibert-1979.08 tags: spike sorting recording depth extracellular glass electrodes active feedback original date: 01-15-2012 06:46 gmt revision:3 [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-95711[0] Spike separation in multiunit records: A multivariate analysis of spike descriptive parameters

  • Glass coated tungsten microeletrodes have high capacitance; they compensate for this by spraying colloidal silver over the outside sheath of the glass, insulating that with varnish, and driving the shield in a positive-feedback way (stabillized in some way?) This negates the capacitance. 'low impedance capacitance compensated'.
    • Capacitance compensation really matters!!
  • Were able to record from single units for 40-100um range (average: 50um) with SNRs 2:1 to 7:1.
    • Some units had SNRs that could reach 15:1 (!!!), these could be recorded for 600 um of descent.
    • more than 3 units could usually be recognized at each recording point by visual inspection of the oscilloscope, and in some cases up to 6 units could be distinguished
    • Is there some clever RF way of neutralizing the capacitance of everything but the electrode tip? Hmm. Might as well try to minimize it.
  • Bandpass 300 Hz - 10 kHz.
  • When the signal crossed the threshold level, it was retained and assumed to be a spike if the duration of the first component was between 70 and 1000 us.
    • This 70 us lower limit was determined on a preliminary study as a fairly good rise time threshold for separation of fiber spikes from somatic or dendritic spikes.
    • I really need to do some single electrode recordings. Platt?
  • Would it be possible to implement this algorithm in realtime on the DSP?
  • Describe clustering based on PCA.
  • Programming this computer (PDP-12) must have been crazy!
  • They analyzed 20k spikes. Mango gives billions.
  • First principal component (F1) represented 60-65% of total information was based mostly on amplitude
  • Second principal component, 15-20% of total information represented mainly time parameters.
  • Suggested 3 parameters: Vmax, Vmin, and T3 (time from max to min).
  • Maybe they don't know what they are talking about:

____References____

[0] Vibert JF, Costa J, Spike separation in multiunit records: a multivariate analysis of spike descriptive parameters.Electroencephalogr Clin Neurophysiol 47:2, 172-82 (1979 Aug)

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ref: Fetz-1969.02 tags: BMI original Fetz operant conditioning date: 01-07-2012 19:04 gmt revision:7 [6] [5] [4] [3] [2] [1] [head]

PMID-4974291[0] Operant conditioning of cortical unit activity

  • (Abstract) The activity of single neurons in precentral cortex of unanesthetized monkeys (Macaca mulatta) was conditioned by reinforcing high rates of neuronal discharge with delivery of a food pellet. Auditory or visual feedback of unit firing rates was usually provided in addition to food reinforcement. After several training sessions, monkeys could increase the activity of newly isolated cells by 50 to 500 percent above rates before reinforcement.
  • Used 'classical' single unit recording.
  • Trepination 5mm circle over hand area.
  • feedback: click for each AP.
  • reinforced on neuron per day.
  • trained neural activity often bursts, usually involved movement such as flexion of the lebow or rotation of the wrist.
  • controlled for sensory positive-feedback loop by performing extinction trials & looking for PETH response to click.
  • I gotta get one of these pellet feeders. monkeys will likely be more motivated, especially if I titrate how frequently they get the food.
  • images/303_1.pdf

PMID-5000088[1] Operant conditioning of specific patterns of neural and muscular activity.

In awake monkeys we recorded activity of single "motor" cortex cells, four contralateral arm muscles, and elbow position, while operantly reinforcing several patterns of motor activity. With the monkey's arm held semiprone in a cast hinged at the elbow, we reinforced active elbow movements and tested cell responses to passive elbow movements. With the cast immobilized we reinforced isometric contraction of each of the four muscles in isolation, and bursts of cortical cell activity with and without simultaneous suppression of muscle activity. Correlations between a precentral cell and specific arm muscles consistently appeared under several behavioral conditions, but could be dissociated by reinforcing cell activity and muscle suppression.

PMID-4624487[2] Operant conditioning of isolated activity in specific muscles and precentral cells

Recorded precentral units in monkeys, trained to contract 4 arm muscles in isolation, under various conditions: passive movements and cutaneous stimulation, active movements and isometric contractions. Some Ss were also reinforced for activity of cortical cells, with no contingency in muscle activity and with simultaneous suppression of all muscular activity. It is concluded that temporal correlations between activity of precentral cells and some other component of the motor response, e.g., muscle activity, force, or position, may depend as strongly on the specific response pattern which is reinforced as on any underlying physiological connection.

____References____

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ref: Najafi-1985.07 tags: Najafi original silicon michigan recording array 1985 MEA date: 01-06-2012 05:27 gmt revision:10 [9] [8] [7] [6] [5] [4] [head]

IEEE-1484848 (pdf) A high-yield IC-compatible multielectrode recording array.

  • Already talks about closed-loop control of a neuroprosthesis.
  • Started testing on-chip NMOS amplifiers.
  • tantalum and polysilicon conductors. some resistivity, but much less than the electrode interface.

____References____

Najafi, K. and Wise, K.D. and Mochizuki, T. A high-yield IC-compatible multichannel recording array Electron Devices, IEEE Transactions on 32 7 1206 - 1211 (1985)

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ref: Jones-1992.01 tags: Utah MEA original date: 01-05-2012 22:08 gmt revision:2 [1] [0] [head]

PMID-1510294[0] A Glass/silicon Composite Intracortical Electrode Array.

  • Describe fabrication of the Utah probe.
  • Needles 1.5mm long, 80um in diameter at the base, tapered.
  • 10 x 10 array on 400um spacing.
  • Impedance 10T ohm, capacitance 50fF
  • Old array used diamond dicing saw.
    • electrodes were isolated via p-n-p junctions, formed via thermomigration.
    • Too clever! These electrodes leaked & had poor yield.
  • New method: melt glass into shallow saw kerfs on the backside of a p-doped 1.83mm thick wafer, then remove much of the silicon from the top using the same saw. This produces columns of silicon held together at the base by glass.
    • Diamond dicing saw has a kerf of 50um. These things sound awesome.
    • Photopatterned aluminum electrode lands on the back.
    • Points are made by an acid etch.
    • Then plated in metal of some sort
    • Followed by polymide insulation (3-6um thick) (rather round from the SEM).
    • DC resistance of 10 to 20k.

____References____

[0] Jones KE, Campbell PK, Normann RA, A glass/silicon composite intracortical electrode array.Ann Biomed Eng 20:4, 423-37 (1992)

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ref: BASMAJIAN-1963.08 tags: original BMI M1 human EMG tuning operant control Basmajian date: 01-05-2012 00:49 gmt revision:6 [5] [4] [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-13969854[0] Control and Training of Individual Motor Units

  • humans have the ability to control the firing rate of peripheral motor units with a high resolution.
  • "The quality of control over anterior horn cells may determine the rates of learning" yup!
  • "Some learn such esquisite control that they soon can produce rhythms of contraction in one unit, imitating drum rolls etc"
  • the youngest persons were among both the best and worst learners.
  • after about 30 minutes the subject was required to learn how to repress the first unit and to recruit another one.
    • motor unit = anterior horn cell, its axon, and all the muscle fibers on which the terminal branches of the axon end. max rate ~= 50hz.
    • motor units can be discriminated, much like cortical neurons, by their shape.
    • some patients could recruit 3-5 units altogether - from one bipolar electrode!
      • in playback mode (task: trigger the queried unit), several subjects had particular difficulty in recruiting the asked-for units. "They groped around in their conscious efforts to find them sometimes, it seemed, only succeded by accident"
    • some patients could recruit motor units in the absence of feedback, but they were unable to explain how they do it.
  • 0.025 (25um) nylon-insulated Karma alloy EMG recording wire.
  • feedback: auditory & visual (oscilloscope).
  • motor units have a maximum rate, above which overflow takes place and other units are recruited (in accord with the size principle).
  • "The controls (are) learned so quickly, are so esquisite, are so well retained after the feedbacks are eliminated that one must not dismiss them as tricks"

____References____

{1016}
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ref: Lilly-1958 tags: Lilly MEA original neural tuning date: 01-04-2012 02:15 gmt revision:4 [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

bibtex: Lilly-1958 Correlations between Neurophysiological Activity in the Cortex and Short-Term Behavior in the Monkey

  • 610 channels in 'Susie'! Unable to record from all of them for lack of recording technology.
  • references the rest of his work.
  • Was able to elicit pretty dramatic and fascinating stimulation responses:
    • 'shrink' as if warding off a blow to the contralateral side of the head;
    • at an adjacent electrode we found a pattern called 'goose', this pattern involved the whole body, and the reaction looks as if the monkey had been forcefully, mechanically stimulated par anum.
    • both were accompanied by high arousal.
  • Suggest that behavioral frequency-of-use corresponds rounghly to cortical rank-area order.
  • Note that the wave velocity (as imaged by his bavatron) in cortex can vary dramatically, from 1 m/sec to 0.1 m/sec.
    • With practice, one can see the boundaries between the 'arm' and 'leg' regions quite easily.
  • Stated our problem quite concisely: "One of the large difficulties in correlating structure, behavior, and CNS activity is the spatial problem of getting enough electrodes, and small enough electrodes, \emph{in} there with minimal injury. (This is why he was usnig pial electrodes). Still another problem is getting enough samples from each electrode per unit time, over a long enough time, to see what goes on during conditioning or learning [...] s for the problem of the investigator's absorbing the data -- if he has adequate recording techniques, he has a lot of time to work on a very short recorded part of a given monkey's life."
  • no figures :-(
  • Lilly could publish. a b -- though he appears to have ADHD (perhaps from the LSD)
    • also see his homepage -- He died in 2001, but it's still up.
  • images/1016_1.pdf

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ref: Lilly-1950 tags: Lilly original MEA glass pipette date: 01-04-2012 01:52 gmt revision:4 [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

bibtex:Lilly-1950 A Method of Recording the Moving Electrical Potential Gradients in the Brain. The 25-Channel Bavatron and Electro-Iconograms.

  • images/1017_2.pdf
  • Every cell in the cortex is within 25 um of a capillary (!). Really?
  • You can already see him wanting to record from whales / dolphins.
  • Used electrode arrays and photocathode tubes to record from cat.
  • 8x8mm array, 2mm spacing, 100um tip opening in the glass pipettes.
    • Pipettes could slide up & down to rest gently on the pia.
    • Were filled via capilary action
    • Both acute and chronic recording.
  • 1mm spacing of electrodes would still record on the order of 5,000 neurons; good thing there is exponential space dependence.
    • Resistance 50k, low so that thermal noise has little effect.
  • recorded 3,500 feet of film (!!); 1,200 feet of film accumulates in two minutes; this takes 48 minutes to see once.
  • Results in preparation ... were they ever published? where? Must have been nearly impossible to analyze without a computer!

{1013}
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ref: Hubel-1957.03 tags: Hubel original tungsten electrode date: 01-03-2012 23:46 gmt revision:3 [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-17793797[0] Tungsten Microelectrode for Recording from Single Units.

  • Advancement upon the micropipette.
  • Lacquer insulation.
  • Suggest that 5um tips or smaller are the best for single unit recording.
  • Steel becomes too fragile near the tip of a very sharp point (what about steel blades?)
  • Electropolishing: immerse a few milimeters in KNO 2 solution and apply 2-6V AC.
    • Such a result is explained by the fact that the meniscus height depends on the diameter of the wire, which decreases as the polishing proceeds.
  • 75M resistance (!!); 500k to 5M at 5-10kHz.
  • Note that he had been recording from at least 1959.

____References____

[0] Hubel DH, Tungsten Microelectrode for Recording from Single Units.Science 125:3247, 549-50 (1957 Mar 22)

{1014}
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ref: GULD-1964.07 tags: platinum iridium microelectrode eltrolytic etching original date: 01-03-2012 19:05 gmt revision:2 [1] [0] [head]

PMID-14199966[0] A Glass-covered platinum microelectrode

  • Details the manufacture and testing of PT-IR (70/30) etched solder glass-coated microelectrodes.
  • Melt a bead of the glass on the top and gradually draw the bead downward, surrounded by the heater of a pipette drawing machine.

____References____

[0] GULD C, A GLASS-COVERED PLATINUM MICROELECTRODE.Med Electron Biol Eng 2no Issue 317-27 (1964 Jul)

{690}
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ref: Chapin-1999.07 tags: chapin Nicolelis BMI neural net original SUNY rat date: 09-02-2009 23:11 gmt revision:2 [1] [0] [head]

PMID-10404201 Real-time control of a robot arm using simultaneously recorded neurons in the motor cortex.

  • Abstract: To determine whether simultaneously recorded motor cortex neurons can be used for real-time device control, rats were trained to position a robot arm to obtain water by pressing a lever. Mathematical transformations, including neural networks, converted multineuron signals into 'neuronal population functions' that accurately predicted lever trajectory. Next, these functions were electronically converted into real-time signals for robot arm control. After switching to this 'neurorobotic' mode, 4 of 6 animals (those with > 25 task-related neurons) routinely used these brain-derived signals to position the robot arm and obtain water. With continued training in neurorobotic mode, the animals' lever movement diminished or stopped. These results suggest a possible means for movement restoration in paralysis patients.
The basic idea of the experiment. Rat controlled the water lever with a forelimb lever, then later learned to control the water lever directly. They used an artificial neural network to decode the intended movement.

{304}
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ref: Humphrey-1970.11 tags: BMI original Humphrey date: 04-09-2007 19:47 gmt revision:1 [0] [head]

PMID-4991377[0] Predicting measures of motor performance from multiple cortical spike trains.

Recordings have been obtained simultaneously from several, individually selected neurons in the motor cortex of unanesthetized monkey as the animal performed simple arm movements. With the use of comparatively simple quantitative procedures, the activity of small sets of cells was found to be adequate for rather accurate real-time prediction of the time course of various response measurements. In addition, the results suggest that hypotheses concerning the response variables "controlled" by cortical motor systems may well depend upon whether or not the temporal relations between simultaneously active neurons are taken into account.

cited in miguel's book, "Methods for Neural ensemble recordings". However, I can't get the text online.

____References____

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ref: DeLong-1974.05 tags: motor control basal ganglia cerebellum motor cortex DeLong putamen original date: 04-09-2007 01:51 gmt revision:1 [0] [head]

PMID-4219745[0] Relation of basal ganglia, cerebellum, and motor cortex units to ramp and ballistic limb movements.

  • monkey trained to make both ballistic movement and slow, pulling movements by pulling a manipulandum between three targets.
  • cells in the putamen discharged preferentially during slow movements.
    • consistent with a sequence / temporal scaling (?) role.
    • also consistent with the cerebellum creating rapid/feedforward trajectories.
  • cells in the motor cortex discharged for both types of movements, though a bit more for ballisic type movements (where the forces were higher).
  • paper is thankfully short and concise.
    • and also humble: "the mere correlation of unit discharge with some aspect of a movement without knowledge of the peripheral site influenced by the unit under study can only provide grounds for speculation".

____References____

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ref: Pollak-1993.01 tags: DBS STN subthalamic nucleus original 1993 Benabid date: 03-12-2007 04:58 gmt revision:2 [1] [0] [head]

PMID-8235208[] Effects of the stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus in Parkinson disease

  • the original study! (in french:)
  • even back then, they used a quadripolar medtronic stimulating electrode w/ stimulation frequency of 130Hz.
  • how far have we come? not too far.

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