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[0] Westby GW, Wang H, A floating microwire technique for multichannel chronic neural recording and stimulation in the awake freely moving rat.J Neurosci Methods 76:2, 123-33 (1997 Oct 3)

[0] Williams JC, Rennaker RL, Kipke DR, Long-term neural recording characteristics of wire microelectrode arrays implanted in cerebral cortex.Brain Res Brain Res Protoc 4:3, 303-13 (1999 Dec)

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ref: -0 tags: ice charles lieber silicon nanowire probes su-8 microwire extracellular date: 10-14-2016 23:28 gmt revision:2 [1] [0] [head]

PMID-26436341 Three-dimensional macroporous nanoelectronic networks as minimally invasive brain probes.

  • Xie C1, Liu J1, Fu TM1, Dai X1, Zhou W1, Lieber CM1,2.
  • Again, use silicon nanowire transistors as sensing elements. These seem rather good; can increase the signal, and do not suffer from shunt resistance / capacitance like wires.
    • They're getting a lot of mileage out of the technology; initial pub back in 2006.
  • Su-8, Cr/Pd/Cr (stress elements) and Cr/Au/Cr (conductor) spontaneously rolled into a ball, then the froze in LN2. Devices seemed robust to freezing in LN2.
  • 300-500nm Su-8 passivation layers, as with the syringe injectable electrodes.
  • 3um trace / 7um insulation (better than us!)
  • Used 100nm Ni release layer; thin / stiff enough Su-8 with rigid Si support chip permitted wirebonding a connector (!!)
    • Might want to use this as well for our electrodes -- of course, then we'd have to use the dicing saw, and free-etch away a Ni (or Al?) polyimide adhesion layer -- or use Su-8 like them. See figure S-4
  • See also {1352}

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ref: Prasad-2012.1 tags: tungsten microwire electrodes histology insulation failure sanchez microwire tungsten date: 06-27-2013 22:40 gmt revision:12 [11] [10] [9] [8] [7] [6] [head]

PMID-23010756[0] Comprehensive characterization and failure modes of tungsten microwire arrays in chronic neural implants.

  • c.f. [1]
  • microwire implant, durations that ranged from acute to up to 9 months in 25 rats.
  • First 2-3 weeks electrode impedance + recording quality fluctuated the most widely.
  • Electrode recording site deterioration continued for the long-term animals as insulation damage occurred and recording surface became more recessed over time.
  • Activated microglia were found near electrode tracts in all chronic animals.
    • High ferritin expression, intraparenchymal bleeding, microglial degeneration suggesting presence of excessive oxidative stress via Fenton chemistry.
      • Wikipedia: Free iron is toxic to cells as it acts as a catalyst in the formation of free radicals from reactive oxygen species via the Fenton Reaction.[11] Hence vertebrates use an elaborate set of protective mechanisms to bind iron in various tissue compartments.
  • Ferritin expression sometimes associated with blebbing / cytorrhexis. (in figures 7-8)
    • Interestingly, during the first few hours after implantation many microglial cells are undergoing cytoplasmic fragmentation (cytorrhexis) which indicates ongoing degeneration of these cells as their cytoplasm literally breaks apart. Cytorrhexis has been previously observed in the aged human brain where it becomes particular prominent in subjects with Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Could not discriminate abiotic (insulation, recording site size) and biotic (inflammatory response) causes of failure.
    • Microglial response not correlated with prolonged performance.
  • Tungsten TDT microwire arrays. 50um diameter, 10um polyimide insulation.
  • SEM imaging pre and prior implantation.
  • Antibodies marking microglia:
    • Iba1 marks all microglia.
    • ED1 stain against CD68 to identify active macrophages [80], but not necessarily all activated microglia since many activated cells are not engaged in phagocytosis and thus are ED1-negative.
    • Anti-ferritin staining to identify those microglia involved in the sequestration of free iron that may leak as a result of BBB compromize.
      • Issue: ferritin is expressed in all tissues ..
    • OX-6 to identify antigen-presenting MHC-II (immune) cells, e.g. microglia or blood-borne immune cells.
  • Found the immunohistoheamistry not terribly convincing.
    • Above, arrows show withdrawn electrode tips.
  • Working with the FDA to promote good laboratory practice (GLP) and good manufacturing practice (GMP). Can mention the same.
  • No evidence of infection in rats.
    • Not true in monkeys..

____References____

[0] Prasad A, Xue QS, Sankar V, Nishida T, Shaw G, Streit WJ, Sanchez JC, Comprehensive characterization and failure modes of tungsten microwire arrays in chronic neural implants.J Neural Eng 9:5, 056015 (2012 Oct)
[1] Freire MA, Morya E, Faber J, Santos JR, Guimaraes JS, Lemos NA, Sameshima K, Pereira A, Ribeiro S, Nicolelis MA, Comprehensive analysis of tissue preservation and recording quality from chronic multielectrode implants.PLoS One 6:11, e27554 (2011)

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ref: Westby-1997.1 tags: recording microwire electrode MEA sweet sucrose saliva dissolving FET floating date: 01-28-2013 00:28 gmt revision:5 [4] [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-9350963 A floating microwire technique for multichannel neural recording and stimulation in the awake rat

  • sweet electrodes -- attached to glass micropipette with sucrose or saliva.
    • Chorover and DeLuca 1972 "A sweet new multiple electrode for chronic single unit recording". {1019}
  • 42 implanted rats, 252 implanted wires, 79% yield. 62% of electrodes still working at 5 weeks.
    • Targeting an area with really large somas (50um).
  • fully-floating 25um microwire ellectrodes.
  • platinum iridium, 25um, teflon coated, handled only with silastic-protected pliers & tweezers to prevent damage to the insulation.
  • electrode impdance range 200-900kOhms; check insulation by applying -3V to each electrode & looking for hydrogen bubbles.
  • soldering hardens platinum iridium alloy (huh).
  • (!!!) wires are stiffened for implantation by temporarily attaching them to a micropipette guide with sucrose which subsequently dissolves in the brain!
  • the smooth sucrose (40 grams in 50ml of water heated to 118C) coating requires about a week of desiccation to become hard enough for insertion into the brain without premature softening. Sucrose becomes clear like glass once fully desiccated.
  • the air above the craniotomy is sufficiently humid to dissolve the sucrose if left there for more than a few seconds.
  • used a miniature single-channel FET amplifier as a headstage - only one channel out of 6 could be recorded at once :( Thus their reults only apply to the best of the microwires implanted - not to all of them.
  • recorded onto a mac quadra (hahah) 20khz 12 bit
  • applying 160ua microstimulation pulses can restore low (200kohm) electrode impedance. Recording quality was generally improved for a few days following stimulation but then returned to an asymptotic level with the impedance at approximately 900kOhm.
  • electrodes only seemed to last 5 weeks, whence they declined to about 27% yeild - see figure 8.
  • good review of microelectrode recording up to that point (1997).

____References____

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ref: Nicolelis-1997 tags: nicolelis microwire array electrophysiology rats date: 01-05-2012 03:35 gmt revision:2 [1] [0] [head]

PMID-9136763[0] Reconstructing the engram: simultaneous, multisite, many single neuron recordings.

  • descibes Miguel's microwire arrays.
  • 100 units from 48 microwires in rats.
  • 2.3 units / microwire.
  • stable for weeks -- c.f. 2011. [1]

____References____

[0] Nicolelis MA, Ghazanfar AA, Faggin BM, Votaw S, Oliveira LM, Reconstructing the engram: simultaneous, multisite, many single neuron recordings.Neuron 18:4, 529-37 (1997 Apr)
[1] Freire MA, Morya E, Faber J, Santos JR, Guimaraes JS, Lemos NA, Sameshima K, Pereira A, Ribeiro S, Nicolelis MA, Comprehensive analysis of tissue preservation and recording quality from chronic multielectrode implants.PLoS One 6:11, e27554 (2011)

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ref: Williams-1999.12 tags: recording microwire guinea kipke MEA Michigan date: 01-03-2012 03:18 gmt revision:2 [1] [0] [head]

PMID-10592339[0] Long term neural recording characteristics of wire microelectrode arrays implanted in cerebral cortex

  • details the williams microwire array assembly protocol - basically the same as what gary does here in the nicolelis lab, only written up nicely and for guinea pigs not rhesus macaques.
  • references miguel's book on multielectrode recordings

____References____

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ref: Nicolelis-1998.11 tags: spatiotemporal spiking nicolelis somatosensory tactile S1 3b microwire array rate temporal coding code date: 12-28-2011 20:42 gmt revision:3 [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-10196571[0] Simultaneous encoding of tactile information by three primate cortical areas

  • owl monkeys.
  • used microwires arrays to decode the location of tactile stimuli; location was encoded through te population, not within single units.
  • areas 3b, S1 & S2.
  • used LVQ (learning vector quantization) backprop, LDA to predict/ classify touch trials; all yielded about the same ~60% accuracy. Chance level 33%.
  • Interesting: "the spatiotemporal character of neuronal responses in the SII cortex was shown to contain the requisite information for the encoding of stimulus location using temporally patterned spike sequences, whereas the simultaneously recorded neuronal responses in areas 3b and 2 contained the requisite information for rate coding."
    • They support this result by varying bin widths and looking at the % of correctly classivied trials. in SII, increasing bin width decreases (slightly but significantly) the prediction accuracy.

____References____

[0] Nicolelis MA, Ghazanfar AA, Stambaugh CR, Oliveira LM, Laubach M, Chapin JK, Nelson RJ, Kaas JH, Simultaneous encoding of tactile information by three primate cortical areas.Nat Neurosci 1:7, 621-30 (1998 Nov)