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[0] Suner S, Fellows MR, Vargas-Irwin C, Nakata GK, Donoghue JP, Reliability of signals from a chronically implanted, silicon-based electrode array in non-human primate primary motor cortex.IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng 13:4, 524-41 (2005 Dec)

[0] Rousche PJ, Normann RA, Chronic recording capability of the Utah Intracortical Electrode Array in cat sensory cortex.J Neurosci Methods 82:1, 1-15 (1998 Jul 1)

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ref: -0 tags: NET probes SU-8 microfabrication sewing machine carbon fiber electrode insertion mice histology 2p date: 03-01-2017 23:20 gmt revision:0 [head]

Ultraflexible nanoelectronic probes form reliable, glial scar–free neural integration

  • SU-8 asymptotic H2O absorption is 3.3% in PBS -- quite a bit higher than I expected, and higher than PI.
  • Faced yield problems with contact litho at 2-3um trace/space.
  • Good recordings out to 4 months!
  • 3 minutes / probe insertion.
  • Fab:
    • Ni release layer, Su-8 2000.5. "excellent tensile strength" --
      • Tensile strength 60 MPa
      • Youngs modulus 2.0 GPa
      • Elongation at break 6.5%
      • Water absorption, per spec sheet, 0.65% (but not PBS)
    • 500nm dielectric; < 1% crosstalk; see figure S12.
    • Pt or Au rec sites, 10um x 20um or 30 x 30um.
    • FFC connector, with Si substrate remaining.
  • Used transgenic mice, YFP expressed in neurons.
  • CA glue used before metabond, followed by Kwik-sil silicone.
  • Neuron yield not so great -- they need to plate the electrodes down to acceptable impedance. (figure S5)
    • Measured impedance ~ 1M at 1khz.
  • Unclear if 50um x 1um is really that much worse than 10um x 1.5um.
  • Histology looks realyl great, (figure S10).
  • Manuscript did not mention (though the did at the poster) problems with electrode pull-out; they deal with it in the same way, application of ACSF.

{747}
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ref: Seymour-2007.09 tags: neural probe design recording Kipke Seymour parelene MEA histology PEDOT date: 02-23-2017 23:52 gmt revision:13 [12] [11] [10] [9] [8] [7] [head]

PMID-17517431[0] Neural probe design for reduced tissue encapsulation in CNS.

  • See conference proceedings too: PMID-17947102[1] Fabrication of polymer neural probes with sub-cellular features for reduced tissue encapsulation.
    • -- useful information.
  • They use SU8 - photoresist! - as a structural material. See also this.
    • They use silicon as a substrate for the fabrication, but ultimately remove it. Electrodes could be made of titanium, modulo low conductivity.
  • Did not / could not record from these devices. Only immunochemistry.
  • Polymer fibers smaller than 7um are basically invisible to the immune system. See [2]
  • Their peripheral recording site is 4 x 5um - but still not invisible to microglia. Perhaps this is because of residual insertion trauma, or movement trauma? They implanted the device flush with the cortical surface, so there should have been little cranial tethering.
  • Checked the animals 4 weeks after implantation.
  • Peripheral electrode site was better than shank location, but still not perfect. Well, any improvement is a good one...
  • No statistical difference between 4x5um lattice probes, 10x4um probes, 30x4um, and solid (100um) knife edge.
    • Think that this may be because of electrode micromotion -- the lateral edge sites are still relatively well connected to the thick, rigid shank.
  • Observed two classes of immune reactivity --
    • GFAP reactive hypertrophied astrocytes.
    • devoid of GFAP, neurofilament, and NEuN, but always OX-42 and often firbronectin and laminin positive as well.
    • Think that the second may be from meningeal cells pulled in with the stab wound.
  • Sensitivity is expected to increase with decreased surface area (but similar low impedance -- platinum black or oxidized iridium or PEDOT {1112} ).
  • Thoughts: it may be possible to put 'barbs' to relieve mechanical stress slightly after the probe location, preferably spikes that expand after implantation.
  • His thesis {1110}

____References____

[0] Seymour JP, Kipke DR, Neural probe design for reduced tissue encapsulation in CNS.Biomaterials 28:25, 3594-607 (2007 Sep)
[1] Seymour JP, Kipke DR, Fabrication of polymer neural probes with sub-cellular features for reduced tissue encapsulation.Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 1no Issue 4606-9 (2006)
[2] Sanders JE, Stiles CE, Hayes CL, Tissue response to single-polymer fibers of varying diameters: evaluation of fibrous encapsulation and macrophage density.J Biomed Mater Res 52:1, 231-7 (2000 Oct)

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ref: Schmidt-1993.11 tags: Normann utah array histology silicon electrode array cats date: 02-23-2017 22:03 gmt revision:4 [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-8263001[0] Biocompatibility of silicon-based electrode arrays implanted in feline cortical tissue.

  • Tried two different times:
    • one day before euthanasia
    • 6 month implant.
  • Tried three different implants:
    • Uncoated silicon,
    • polymide coating
    • polymide coating with SiO2 adhesion layer / primer.
  • The last was the worst in terms of histopathological response.
  • Chronic implants showed relatively restrained immune response,
    • Gliosis was found around all tracks, 20-40um.
  • Encapsulation was less than 9um.
  • Edema and hemorrhage was minor but present on a subset of all implants.
  • Acute (24h) hemorrhage was more severe -- ~ 60%; edema ~ 20%.
  • Chronic histology revealed considerable macrophages w/ hemosiderin (a complex including ferritin)
  • See also [1]

____References____

[0] Schmidt S, Horch K, Normann R, Biocompatibility of silicon-based electrode arrays implanted in feline cortical tissue.J Biomed Mater Res 27:11, 1393-9 (1993 Nov)
[1] Jones KE, Campbell PK, Normann RA, A glass/silicon composite intracortical electrode array.Ann Biomed Eng 20:4, 423-37 (1992)

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ref: Linsmeier-2011.01 tags: histology lund electrodes immune response fine flexible review Thelin date: 12-08-2015 23:57 gmt revision:6 [5] [4] [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-21867803[0] Can histology solve the riddle of the nonfunctioning electrode? Factors influencing the biocompatibility of brain machine interfaces.

  • We show results from an ultrathin multichannel wire electrode that has been implanted in the rat cerebral cortex for 1 year.
    • 12um Pt-Ir wires in a 200um bundle coated with gelatin. See PMID-20551508[1]
    • Electrode was left in the rat cortex for 354 days
    • no clear GFAP staining or ED1 positive cells at the electrode tips.
  • To improve biocompatibility of implanted electrodes, we would like to suggest that free-floating, very small, flexible, and, in time, wireless electrodes would elicit a diminished cell encapsulation.
  • Suggest standardized methods for the electrode design, the electrode implantation method, and the analyses of cell reactions after implantation
  • somewhat of a review -- Stice, Biran 2005 [2] 2007 [3].
  • 50um is the recording distance Purcell 2009.
  • See also [4]
  • Study of neuronal density and ED1 reactivity / GFAP:
    • Even at 12 weeks the correlation between NeuN density and GFAP / ED1 was small -- r 2=0.12
    • Note that DAPI labels many unknown cells in the vicinity of the electrode.

____References____

[0] Linsmeier CE, Thelin J, Danielsen N, Can histology solve the riddle of the nonfunctioning electrode? Factors influencing the biocompatibility of brain machine interfaces.Prog Brain Res 194no Issue 181-9 (2011)
[1] Lind G, Linsmeier CE, Thelin J, Schouenborg J, Gelatine-embedded electrodes--a novel biocompatible vehicle allowing implantation of highly flexible microelectrodes.J Neural Eng 7:4, 046005 (2010 Aug)
[2] Biran R, Martin DC, Tresco PA, Neuronal cell loss accompanies the brain tissue response to chronically implanted silicon microelectrode arrays.Exp Neurol 195:1, 115-26 (2005 Sep)
[3] Biran R, Martin DC, Tresco PA, The brain tissue response to implanted silicon microelectrode arrays is increased when the device is tethered to the skull.J Biomed Mater Res A 82:1, 169-78 (2007 Jul)
[4] Thelin J, Jörntell H, Psouni E, Garwicz M, Schouenborg J, Danielsen N, Linsmeier CE, Implant size and fixation mode strongly influence tissue reactions in the CNS.PLoS One 6:1, e16267 (2011 Jan 26)

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ref: Cheung-2007.03 tags: flexible electrode array Michigan probe histology Vancouver current source density EPFL polyimide date: 12-21-2013 21:07 gmt revision:5 [4] [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-17027251[0] Flexible polyimide microelectrode array for in vivo recordings and current source density analysis.

  • Polyimide -- PI-2611 precusor.
  • 50nm Ti adhesion, 200nm Pt, both sputtered.
  • Electrodes etched via RIE in Cl2.
    • Sputtered and photo-patterned SiO2 etch mask.
  • Used regular solder to connect to a Samtec.
  • 15um total thickness.
  • 25um electrode diameter.
  • They were inserted directly (no carrier nor guide) into the brain; can be re-used.
  • Tested to 8 weeks.
  • No figure comparing silicon and polyimide, though they claim minimal GFAP response to the electrodes.

____References____

[0] Cheung KC, Renaud P, Tanila H, Djupsund K, Flexible polyimide microelectrode array for in vivo recordings and current source density analysis.Biosens Bioelectron 22:8, 1783-90 (2007 Mar 15)

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ref: -0 tags: Kozai carbon nanotube electrode rcording histology date: 08-02-2013 05:42 gmt revision:1 [0] [head]

PMID-23142839 Ultrasmall implantable composite microelectrodes with bioactive surfaces for chronic neural interfaces.

  • Here, we report the development of an integrated composite electrode consisting of a carbon-fibre core, a poly(p-xylylene)-based thin-film coating that acts as a dielectric barrier and that is functionalized to control intrinsic biological processes, and a poly(thiophene)-based recording pad.
  • 7um diameter carbon nanotubes slide easily into cortex & yield good recording.
  • only 0.8um of parlyene-N coating.
    • Does it stick well? Does it crack?
  • Functionalized the parylene with 50nm of bromine / oxygen complex, bromoisobutyrate.
  • PEDOT recording surface drastically lowered impedance.
  • Difficult to assemble these little buggers!

{1193}
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ref: Prasad-2012.1 tags: tungsten microwire electrodes histology insulation failure sanchez microwire tungsten date: 06-27-2013 22:40 gmt revision:12 [11] [10] [9] [8] [7] [6] [head]

PMID-23010756[0] Comprehensive characterization and failure modes of tungsten microwire arrays in chronic neural implants.

  • c.f. [1]
  • microwire implant, durations that ranged from acute to up to 9 months in 25 rats.
  • First 2-3 weeks electrode impedance + recording quality fluctuated the most widely.
  • Electrode recording site deterioration continued for the long-term animals as insulation damage occurred and recording surface became more recessed over time.
  • Activated microglia were found near electrode tracts in all chronic animals.
    • High ferritin expression, intraparenchymal bleeding, microglial degeneration suggesting presence of excessive oxidative stress via Fenton chemistry.
      • Wikipedia: Free iron is toxic to cells as it acts as a catalyst in the formation of free radicals from reactive oxygen species via the Fenton Reaction.[11] Hence vertebrates use an elaborate set of protective mechanisms to bind iron in various tissue compartments.
  • Ferritin expression sometimes associated with blebbing / cytorrhexis. (in figures 7-8)
    • Interestingly, during the first few hours after implantation many microglial cells are undergoing cytoplasmic fragmentation (cytorrhexis) which indicates ongoing degeneration of these cells as their cytoplasm literally breaks apart. Cytorrhexis has been previously observed in the aged human brain where it becomes particular prominent in subjects with Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Could not discriminate abiotic (insulation, recording site size) and biotic (inflammatory response) causes of failure.
    • Microglial response not correlated with prolonged performance.
  • Tungsten TDT microwire arrays. 50um diameter, 10um polyimide insulation.
  • SEM imaging pre and prior implantation.
  • Antibodies marking microglia:
    • Iba1 marks all microglia.
    • ED1 stain against CD68 to identify active macrophages [80], but not necessarily all activated microglia since many activated cells are not engaged in phagocytosis and thus are ED1-negative.
    • Anti-ferritin staining to identify those microglia involved in the sequestration of free iron that may leak as a result of BBB compromize.
      • Issue: ferritin is expressed in all tissues ..
    • OX-6 to identify antigen-presenting MHC-II (immune) cells, e.g. microglia or blood-borne immune cells.
  • Found the immunohistoheamistry not terribly convincing.
    • Above, arrows show withdrawn electrode tips.
  • Working with the FDA to promote good laboratory practice (GLP) and good manufacturing practice (GMP). Can mention the same.
  • No evidence of infection in rats.
    • Not true in monkeys..

____References____

[0] Prasad A, Xue QS, Sankar V, Nishida T, Shaw G, Streit WJ, Sanchez JC, Comprehensive characterization and failure modes of tungsten microwire arrays in chronic neural implants.J Neural Eng 9:5, 056015 (2012 Oct)
[1] Freire MA, Morya E, Faber J, Santos JR, Guimaraes JS, Lemos NA, Sameshima K, Pereira A, Ribeiro S, Nicolelis MA, Comprehensive analysis of tissue preservation and recording quality from chronic multielectrode implants.PLoS One 6:11, e27554 (2011)

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ref: -0 tags: silicon electrode histology Michigan tip shape shear force date: 04-24-2013 20:02 gmt revision:3 [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-1601445 Factors influencing the biocompatibility of insertable silicon microshafts in cerebral cortex.

  • Relatively early assessment of tissue reaction to silicon electrodes.
  • Noted 'severe' reaction at electrode tip; recommend recording along the shaft, Michigan style.
  • Noted microhematoma formation.
  • Recommend fast insertion.
  • Bending of the shafts (e.g. they exert lateral force) causes lateral tissue damage.
    • Problem with fast insertion is that it may cause the needle to bend a bit -- resulting in lateral 'kill zone'.
    • Ultimate speed must be a compromise.
  • Advocate shearing blade tip or chisel point to sever microtubules, rather than a conical tip pushing them to a annular ring that can grab to the sides of the needle.
  • Good paper, reviews the relevant cellular anatomy...

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ref: -0 tags: histology immune response otto indiana electrodes gfap inflamation transparent clearing vimentin date: 04-19-2013 23:59 gmt revision:4 [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-23428842 Chronic intracortical microelectrode arrays induce non-uniform, depth-related tissue responses.

  • Woolley AJ, Desai HA, Otto KJ.
  • One timepoint, 4 weeks.
  • Laser confocal microscopy
    • after tissue clearing (optical index of refraction matching) in a 60% sucrose solution.
  • Single-shank iridium contact silicon substrate MEA.
    • Device cut level with surface of brain after insertion.
  • Intact MEAs via device-capture histology, DHhist (Woolley et al 2011)
    • 350-450um tissue explanted with device.
    • They promote their technique.
  • Tissue surrounding microdevices exhibited two major depth-related phenomena:
    • a non-uniform microglial coating along the device length and
    • a dense mass of cells surrounding the implant in cerebral cortical layers I and II.
      • The dense mass of cells contained vimentin, a protein not typically expressed highly in CNS cells, evidence that non-CNS cells likely descended down the face of the penetrating devices from the pial surface.
        • But no Iba1 (activated microglia) per se in the tissue mass.
    • Hoe342 -- cell marker.
    • This mass was apparently consistent across animals!
    • Cells in the mass were VIM positive -- fibroblasts -- meninges?
  • low GFAP = not an astrocytic scar.
  • This study provides further evidence that a progressive invasion of non-CNS cells contributes substantially to the chronic phase of the tissue response around intracortical MEAs.
    • Again, might be from BBB distruption {1237}


This result is supported by previous papers:
  • {1193} -- microglia response not correlated to electrode failure, but correlated to ferritin immunoresponse
  • {781} -- also note that menigeal fibroblasts migrate down electrode tracts.
  • {1028} -- measured vimentin, GFAP, and ED1 (not Iba1). Found Vim+ and GFAP+, suggesting reactive astrocytes and not meningeal cells. ED1 aka CD68 is specific to macrophages and not microglia, so these may be blood-derived cells.
  • {1200} -- chronic contact with the meninges v.s intraparenchymal correlated with Vim+ encapsulation.
  • {1210} -- old paper showing the same result near surface of implant.
  • {1196} -- more against GFAP & pro BBB disruption
  • {1204} -- GFAP uncorrelated (!) with NeuN intensity
  • {307} -- all initial tests of utah arrays showed fibrous encapsulation; one array was completely explanted. This is why now they put gore-tex over the implant -- to prevent fibroblast migration (i guess).

{1237}
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ref: -0 tags: winslow Tresco 2010 BBB histology immune response microelectrodes date: 04-19-2013 23:25 gmt revision:0 [head]

PMID-19963267 Quantitative analysis of the tissue response to chronically implanted microwire electrodes in rat cortex.

  • Winslow BD, Tresco PA.
  • The spatial distribution of biomarkers associated with the foreign body response to insulated microwires placed in rat cerebral cortex was analyzed 2, 4, and 12 weeks after implantation using quantitative methods.
  • We found no evidence that reactive gliosis increases over time or that neuronal loss is progressive, we did find evidence of persistent inflammation and enhanced BBB permeability at the electrode brain tissue interface that extended over the 3 month indwelling period and that exhibited more animal to animal variability at 3 months than at 2 and 4 weeks.

{597}
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ref: Suner-2005.12 tags: Suner Utah probe electrophysiology reliability chronic electrode recording longevity histology MEA date: 01-31-2013 22:27 gmt revision:7 [6] [5] [4] [3] [2] [1] [head]

PMID-16425835Reliability of signals from a chronically implanted, silicon-based electrode array in non-human primate primary motor cortex

  • claim that they have done a logitudinal development series that included 39 array implants in 18 monkeys.
  • can get reliable recordings out to 3 months (only? probably the array was forced out of the brain?)
    • however, it seems that their recording quality did not decrease dramatically over those 3 months.
  • excellent methods section.
  • also {1027}

____References____

{1225}
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ref: -0 tags: histology optical coherence tomography vasculature avoidance date: 01-29-2013 06:46 gmt revision:0 [head]

PMID-9766311 Optical coherence tomography for neurosurgical imaging of human intracortical melanoma.

  • Relevant for our interests: Subsurface cerebral vascular structures could be identified and were therefore avoided.
  • more broadly, could identify subsurface metastatic melanoma due to reflectance changes. nice.

{1224}
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ref: Yuen-1995.08 tags: stab wound histology rabbits date: 01-29-2013 03:56 gmt revision:1 [0] [head]

PMID-8562785[0] Histological evaluation of polyesterimide-insulated gold wires in brain.

  • no evidence of needle pull-through (stab wound) in rabbits

____References____

[0] Yuen TG, Agnew WF, Histological evaluation of polyesterimide-insulated gold wires in brain.Biomaterials 16:12, 951-6 (1995 Aug)

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ref: Neary-2003.03 tags: histology astrocyte response date: 01-29-2013 01:02 gmt revision:1 [0] [head]

PMID-12657694[0] High rate shear strain of three-dimensional neural cell cultures: a new in vitro traumatic brain injury model.

  • Astrocytes have mechanoreceptors that induces ERK signaling.
    • ERK =extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase, a key regulator of cellular proliferation and differentiation.

____References____

[0] Neary JT, Kang Y, Willoughby KA, Ellis EF, Activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase by stretch-induced injury in astrocytes involves extracellular ATP and P2 purinergic receptors.J Neurosci 23:6, 2348-56 (2003 Mar 15)

{781}
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ref: Polikov-2005.1 tags: neural response glia histology immune electrodes recording 2005 Tresco Michigan microglia date: 01-29-2013 00:34 gmt revision:10 [9] [8] [7] [6] [5] [4] [head]

PMID-16198003[0] Response of brain tissue to chronically implanted neural electrodes

  • Good review (the kind where figures are taken from other papers). Nothing terribly new (upon a very cursory inspection)
  • When CNS damage severs blood vessels, microglia are indistinguishable from the blood borne, monocyte-derived macrophages that are recruited by the degranulation of platelets and the cellular release of cytokines.
  • Furthermore, microglia are known to secrete, either constitutively, or in response to pathological stimuli, neurotrophic factors that aid in neuronal survival and growth.
    • Also release cytotoxic and neurotoxic factors that can lead to neuronal death in vitro.
    • It has been suggested that the presence of insoluble materials in the brain may lead to a state of 'frustrated phagocytosis' or inability of the macrophages to remove the foreign body, resulting in persistent release of neurotoxic substances.
  • When a 10x10 array of silicon probes was implanted in feline cortex, 60% of the needle tracks showed evidence of hemorrhage and 25% showed edema upon explantation of the probes after one day (Schmidt et al 1993) {1163}
    • Although a large number of the tracks were affected, only 3-5% of the area was actually covered by hemorrhages and edema, suggesting the actual damage to blood vessels may have been relatively minor. (!!)
  • Excess fluid and cellular debris diminishes 6-8 days due to the action of activated microglia and re-absorption.
  • As testament to the transitory nature of this mechanically induced wound healing response, electrode tracks could not be found in animals after several months when the electrode was inerted and quickly removed (Yuen and Agnew 1995, Rousche et al 2001; Csicsvari et al 2003, Biran et al 2005).
  • Biran et al 2005: observed persistent ED-1 immunoreactivity around silicon microelectrode arrays implanted in rat cortex at 2 and 4 weeks following implantation; not seen in microelectrode stab wound controls.
  • On the glial scar:
    • observed in the CNS of all vertebrates, presumably to isolate damaged parts of the nervous system and maintain the integrity of the blood-brain barrier.
    • mostly composed of reactive astrocytes.
    • presumably the glial scar insulates electrodes from nearby neurons, hindering diffusion and increasing impedance.
  • On the meninges:
    • Meningeal fibroblasts, which also stain for vimentin, but not for GFAP, may migrate down the electrode shaft from the brain surface and form the early basis for the glial scar.
  • On recording quality:
    • Histological examination upon explantation revealed that every electrode with stable unit recordings had at least one large neuron near the electrode tip, while every electrode that was not able to record resolvable action potentials was explanted from a site with no large neurons nearby.
  • Perhaps the clearest example of this variability was observed in the in vivo response to plastic “mock electrodes” implanted in rabbit brain by Stensaas and Stensaas (1976) {1210} and explanted over the course of 2 years. They separated the response into three types: Type 1 was characterized by little to no gliosis with neurons adjacent to the implant, Type 2 had a reactive astrocyte zone, and Type 3 exhibited a layer of connective tissue between the reactive astrocyte layer and the implant, with neurons pushed more than 100 um away. All three responses are well documented in the literature; however this study found that the model electrodes produced all three types of reactions simultaneously,depending on where along the electrode one looked.

____References____

[0] Polikov VS, Tresco PA, Reichert WM, Response of brain tissue to chronically implanted neural electrodes.J Neurosci Methods 148:1, 1-18 (2005 Oct 15)

{748}
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ref: Leung-2008.08 tags: biocompatibility alginate tissue response immunochemistry microglia insulation spin coating Tresco recording histology MEA date: 01-28-2013 21:19 gmt revision:4 [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-18485471[0] Characterization of microglial attachment and cytokine release on biomaterials of differing surface chemistry

  • The important result is that materials with low protein-binding (e.g. alginate) have fewer bound microglia, hence better biocompatibility. It also seems to help if the material is highly hydrophilic.
    • Yes alginate is made from algae.
  • Used Michigan probes for implantation.
  • ED1 = pan-macrophage marker.
    • (quote:) Quantification of cells on the surface indicated that the number of adherent microglia appeared higher on the smooth side of the electrode compared to the grooved, recording site side (Fig. 2B), and declined with time. However, at no point were electrodes completely free of attached and activated microglial cells nor did these cells disappear from the interfacial zone along the electrode tract.
    • but these were not coated with anything new .. ???

____References____

[0] Leung BK, Biran R, Underwood CJ, Tresco PA, Characterization of microglial attachment and cytokine release on biomaterials of differing surface chemistry.Biomaterials 29:23, 3289-97 (2008 Aug)

{1036}
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ref: -0 tags: decoding recording todo read biocompatibility histology electrodes future date: 01-28-2013 20:52 gmt revision:9 [8] [7] [6] [5] [4] [3] [head]

Things to read!

decoding:

  • PMID-20359500 Population decoding of motor cortical activity using a generalized linear model with hidden states
  • Robust satisficing linear regression: Performance/robustness trade-off and consistency criterion
  • PMID-15813408 Closed-loop cortical control of direction using support vector machines
  • Efficient Decoding With Steady-State Kalman Filter in Neural Interface Systems
    • Fixed gain: We analyze a low-complexity Kalman filter implementation in which the filter gain is approximated by its steady-state form, computed offline before real-time decoding commences.
    • We also find that the steady-state Kalman filter reduces the computational load (algorithm execution time) for decoding the firing rates of 25±3 single units by a factor of 7.0±0.9.

electrodes:

other random scribblings: Vascularization {1027} histology {736},{737} and size {1028},{747},{1026}, insulation {1033}. How very very important -- as important or moreso than the recording technology. What has happened to {149} ?

{1028}
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ref: Szarowski-2003.09 tags: Michigan array silicon histology MEA cornell date: 01-28-2013 20:47 gmt revision:6 [5] [4] [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-12914963[0] Brain responses to micro-machined silicon devices.

  • Used 2 different implants (rough & sharp corners, smooth), 2 different ways of inserting (slow, by hand).
    • Neither made much diff.
  • Measured GFAP = glial fibrillary acidic protein, a standard measure for assesing reactive gliosis [44,18,28,33,35].
    • Normally larger astrocytes were seen around larger blood vessels.
    • "At four weeks, a clear sheath of GFAP-positive astrocytes was observed"
    • GFAP labeled sheath seems to have plateaued at 6 weeks. (The sheath may be useful for our devices... )
  • Measured Vimentin, which is increased in reactive astrocytes and is not normally expressed in mature astrocytes [6,12,15,40].
    • In control animals vimentin only present in ependymal lining of the ventricles.
    • At 6 weeks, sites around both types of devices had a compact sheath of vimentin-positive astrocytes 50-100um.
    • Seemed to be a plateau as with GFAP .. though it seems to label a slightly distinct set of cells.
  • Also labeled reactive microglia with ED1 [4,19,27,36].
  • Quote: These data indicate that device insertion promotes two responses-an early response that is proportional to device size and a sustained response that is independent of device size, geometry, and surface roughness. The early response may be associated with the amount of damage generated during insertion. The sustained response is more likely due to tissue-device interactions.

____References____

[0] Szarowski DH, Andersen MD, Retterer S, Spence AJ, Isaacson M, Craighead HG, Turner JN, Shain W, Brain responses to micro-machined silicon devices.Brain Res 983:1-2, 23-35 (2003 Sep 5)

{1220}
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ref: -0 tags: histology review electrode response bioactive coatings date: 01-28-2013 20:16 gmt revision:0 [head]

PMID-20577634 Biocompatibility of intracortical microelectrodes: current status and future prospects.

  • ... but the most widely used method to enhance biocompatibility is the chemical modification of neural probe surfaces with anti-inflammatory compounds, adhesion proteins, or bioactive molecules (Heiduschka and Thanos, 1998; He et al., 2006; Ludwig et al., 2006; Moxon et al., 2007; Rennaker et al., 2007; Seymour and Kipke, 2007; Zhong and Bellamkonda, 2007; Leung et al., 2008; Williams, 2008; Grill et al., 2009)
    • Have any of these achieved success?
    • Many other polymers are basically biocompatible, provided they still insulate after equilibriating with the surrounding vapor pressure.
    • Personally I don't think biocoatings wil lmatter much if there is persistent shear at the interface.
  • Does make sense to have the electrode surface attractive to neurons (Kennedy..). For a later date.

{1219}
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ref: Williams-2007.12 tags: electrode impedance spectroscopy histology date: 01-28-2013 19:12 gmt revision:3 [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-18057508[0] Complex impedance spectroscopy for monitoring tissue responses to inserted neural implants.

  • In general, impedance magnitude at 1 kHz was significantly increased in extensive reactions, starting about 4 days post-implant
    • Impedance is hence predictive of performance.
  • Electrodes with extensive reactions also displayed impedance spectra with a characteristic change at high frequencies. This change was manifested in the formation of a semi-circular arc in the Nyquist space, suggestive of increased cellular density in close proximity to the electrode site.
    • Interesting! Usefull!

____References____

[0] Williams JC, Hippensteel JA, Dilgen J, Shain W, Kipke DR, Complex impedance spectroscopy for monitoring tissue responses to inserted neural implants.J Neural Eng 4:4, 410-23 (2007 Dec)

{1217}
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ref: Bjornsson-2006.09 tags: micro vasculature histology insertion speed tissue shear date: 01-28-2013 03:38 gmt revision:3 [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-16921203[0] Effects of insertion conditions on tissue strain and vascular damage during neuroprosthetic device insertion.

  • We have developed an ex vivo preparation to capture real-time images of tissue deformation during device insertion using thick tissue slices from rat brains prepared with fluorescently labeled vasculature.
  • Direct damage to the vasculature included severing, rupturing and dragging, and was often observed several hundred micrometers from the insertion site. (yikes!)
  • Advocate faster insertion of sharp devices. (tatoo needle?).
  • Cortical surface features greatly affected insertion success; insertions attempted through pial blood vessels resulted in severe tissue compression.
    • Thus, avoiding vasculature is useful not only for avoiding hemorrhaging, but also to prevent excessive tissue compression.
  • High degree of variability
    • Indicates that this should be measured! Scientifically interesting!
  • Insertion speeds:
    • Fast 2 mm/sec
    • Medium 500 um/sec
    • Slow 125 um/sec
  • Perhaps there is no need to experiment with multiple insertion speeds?

____References____

[0] Bjornsson CS, Oh SJ, Al-Kofahi YA, Lim YJ, Smith KL, Turner JN, De S, Roysam B, Shain W, Kim SJ, Effects of insertion conditions on tissue strain and vascular damage during neuroprosthetic device insertion.J Neural Eng 3:3, 196-207 (2006 Sep)

{1200}
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ref: Kim-2004.05 tags: histology electrode immune response Tresco hollow fiber membranes GFAP vimentin ED1 date: 01-28-2013 03:08 gmt revision:7 [6] [5] [4] [3] [2] [1] [head]

PMID-14741588[0] Chronic response of adult rat brain tissue to implants anchored to the skull.

  • The increase in tissue reactivity observed with transcranially implanted HFMs may be influenced by several mechanisms including chronic contact with the meninges and possibly motion of the device within brain tissue.
  • Broadly speaking, our results suggest that any biomaterial, biosensor or device that is anchored to the skull and in chronic contact with meningeal tissue will have a higher level of tissue reactivity than the same material completely implanted within brain tissue.
  • See also [1]
  • Could slice through the hollow fiber membrane for histology. (as we shall).
  • Good list of references.

____References____

[0] Kim YT, Hitchcock RW, Bridge MJ, Tresco PA, Chronic response of adult rat brain tissue to implants anchored to the skull.Biomaterials 25:12, 2229-37 (2004 May)
[1] Biran R, Martin DC, Tresco PA, The brain tissue response to implanted silicon microelectrode arrays is increased when the device is tethered to the skull.J Biomed Mater Res A 82:1, 169-78 (2007 Jul)

{736}
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ref: Liu-1999.09 tags: electrodes recording tissue response MEA histology date: 01-28-2013 00:24 gmt revision:7 [6] [5] [4] [3] [2] [1] [head]

PMID-10498377[0] Stability of the interface between neural tissue and chronically implanted intracortical microelectrodes.

  • implanted 7-shaft 35um iridium electrodes into the pericruciate gyrus of cats & measured the stability of recordings over several months.
  • electrodes were floating, under the dura; they note that connective tissue can force these floating arrays out of the brain, in further, or can encapsulate the electrodes.
    • electrodes activated by 'potentiodynamic cycling' to remove the insulation from the tip, I guess.
    • Insulation is epoxylite epoxy (5-10um thick) which is baked for curing and degassing at 100 and 170C each for 30 minutes.
    • more information on their fabrication in {1105}
  • Used the now-standard techniques for recording & analysis - amazing that this was all very new 10 years ago!
  • Measure stability not only on waveform shape (which will change as the position of the electrode relative to the neuron changes) but also neural tuning.
  • Lymphocytes were found to accumulate around the tips of the microstimulated sites.
  • Electrode sites that yielded recordings ('active') were all clean, with large neurons near the end, and with minimal connective tissue sheath (2-8 um; distance to nearby neurons was 30-50um).
    • Longest period for an active electrode was 242 days.
    • Electrode impedance was usually between 50 and 75 kOhm; there was no insulation failure.
  • Electrodes were stable even when the cat vigorously shook it's head in response to water placed on the head (!).
  • Electrodes were very unstable the first 2 weeks - 1 month ; rather stable thereafter.
    • Active electrodes tended to remain active ; inactive electrodes tended to remain inactive.

____References____

[0] Liu X, McCreery DB, Carter RR, Bullara LA, Yuen TG, Agnew WF, Stability of the interface between neural tissue and chronically implanted intracortical microelectrodes.IEEE Trans Rehabil Eng 7:3, 315-26 (1999 Sep)
[1] Bullara LA, McCreery DB, Yuen TG, Agnew WF, A microelectrode for delivery of defined charge densities.J Neurosci Methods 9:1, 15-21 (1983 Sep)

{746}
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ref: Sanders-2000.1 tags: polymer fiber immune reaction biocompatibility rats polycaprolactone recording electrodes histology MEA date: 01-28-2013 00:01 gmt revision:11 [10] [9] [8] [7] [6] [5] [head]

PMID-10906696[0] Tissue response to single-polymer fibers of varying diameters: evaluation of fibrous encapsulation and macrophage density.

  • Fibers smaller than 6μm show reduced immune response.
    • Fibers implanted in the subcutaneous dorsum (below the skin in the back of rats).
    • Polypropylene. (like rope).
    • Wish the result extended to small beads & small electrodes. 7μm is tiny, but possible with insulated Au wires.
      • Beads: try PMID-1913150 -- shows that the 600um - 50um beads ('microspheres') are well tolerated.
      • Also {750}.
  • Macrophage density in tissue with fiber diameters 2.1-5.9um comparable to that of unoperated contralateral control.

"

fiber diametercapsule thickness
2.1-5.90.6
6.5-10.611.7
11.1-15.820.3
16.7-26.725.5

____References____

[0] Sanders JE, Stiles CE, Hayes CL, Tissue response to single-polymer fibers of varying diameters: evaluation of fibrous encapsulation and macrophage density.J Biomed Mater Res 52:1, 231-7 (2000 Oct)

{750}
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ref: Menei-1994.09 tags: microspheres beads polycaprolactone biocompatible drug delivery histology date: 01-27-2013 20:54 gmt revision:3 [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-7814435 Fate and biocompatibility of three types of microspheres implanted into the brain.

  • microspheres ( 24μm ) appear to be engulfed or surrounded by histocytic cells.
  • poly(e-caprolactone), which is supposed to be biodegradable, did not dissolve in the brain. The polymer is hydrophobic.
  • 20um spheres could be engulfed by macrophages; their microspheres were too large, and were encapsulated in a thin coallagen layer and astrocytic process.
  • no scale bars - annoying - but we can estimate the size of the coating to be about the same size as the beads themselves.

{1210}
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ref: Stensaas-1976.01 tags: histology implant electrodes immune response date: 01-25-2013 02:52 gmt revision:1 [0] [head]

PMID-782142[0] The reaction of the cerebral cortex to chronically implanted plastic needles.

  • Three different classes of result:
    • Type I is characterized by little or no gliosis and synapses within 1-5mu of the implant;
    • type II contains a pronounced zone of reactive astrocytes;
    • type III is typified by a zone of connective tissue near the implant surface
      • One implant can evince all 3 different types!
  • Already were thinking of neuroprosthetic devices.

____References____

[0] Stensaas SS, Stensaas LJ, The reaction of the cerebral cortex to chronically implanted plastic needles.Acta Neuropathol 35:3, 187-203 (1976)

{1196}
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ref: Skousen-2011.01 tags: electrodes immune response Tresco Wise Michigan histology GFAP atrocyte surface area foreign body response date: 01-25-2013 01:44 gmt revision:5 [4] [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-21867802[0] Reducing surface area while maintaining implant penetrating profile lowers the brain foreign body response to chronically implanted planar silicon microelectrode arrays.

  • We studied the chronic brain foreign body response to planar solid silicon microelectrode arrays and planar lattice arrays with identical penetrating profiles but with reduced surface area in rats after an 8-week indwelling period.
  • Using quantitative immunohistochemistry, we found that presenting less surface area after equivalent iatrogenic injury is accompanied by significantly less
    • persistent macrophage activation,
    • decreased blood brain barrier leakiness,
    • and reduced neuronal cell loss.
  • Could be a factor of micromotion, too -- the lattice array has more anchoring points (?)
  • They propose it's a factor of TNF- α concentration around the implants. This, and other proinflammatory and cytoxic cytokines, is released by macrophages.
  • "Recent studies from our lab have described disruption of BBB integrity, indicated by the presence of autologous IgG in the brain parenchyma, surrounding both microwire and planar silicon recording devices ([1][2]. Under normal conditions, autologous IgG is excluded from the brain parenchyma (Azzi et al., 1990; Seitz et al., 1985) but has been observed following BBB disruption (Aihara et al., 1994).
    • E.g. the presence of IgG proves that the BBB was compromised.
      • Less so with the lattice implants.
  • Previous work from our lab using single microwires and single shaft, planar silicon microelectrode arrays indicated that the spatial distribution of GFAP does not increase with time over the indwelling period and did not support the “increase in astrogliosis over time hypothesis” as a dominant or general biologically related failure mechanism for this type of microelectrode recording device {1197}.

____References____

[0] Skousen JL, Merriam SM, Srivannavit O, Perlin G, Wise KD, Tresco PA, Reducing surface area while maintaining implant penetrating profile lowers the brain foreign body response to chronically implanted planar silicon microelectrode arrays.Prog Brain Res 194no Issue 167-80 (2011)
[1] Winslow BD, Christensen MB, Yang WK, Solzbacher F, Tresco PA, A comparison of the tissue response to chronically implanted Parylene-C-coated and uncoated planar silicon microelectrode arrays in rat cortex.Biomaterials 31:35, 9163-72 (2010 Dec)
[2] Winslow BD, Tresco PA, Quantitative analysis of the tissue response to chronically implanted microwire electrodes in rat cortex.Biomaterials 31:7, 1558-67 (2010 Mar)

{1198}
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ref: Harris-2011.12 tags: mechanically adaptive electrodes implants case western dissolving flexible histology Harris date: 01-25-2013 01:39 gmt revision:5 [4] [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-22049097[0] Mechanically adaptive intracortical implants improve the proximity of neuronal cell bodies.

  • See also [1]
  • Initial tensile modulus of 5GPa dropped to 12MPa. (almost 500-fold!)
    • Their polymer nanocomposite (NC) still swells 65-70% (with water?)
    • Implant size 100 x 200um.
  • Controlled with tungsten of identical size and coating.
  • Tethered to skull.
  • Interesting:
    • The neuronal nuclei density within 100 µm of the device at four weeks post-implantation was greater for the compliant nanocomposite compared to the stiff wire.
    • At eight weeks post-implantation, the neuronal nuclei density around the nanocomposite was maintained, but the density around the wire recovered to match that of the nanocomposite.
    • Hypothesis, in discussion: softer implants are affecting the time-course of the response rather that final results
  • The glial scar response to the compliant nanocomposite was less vigorous than it was to the stiffer wire
  • Cultured astrocytes have been shown to respond to mechanical stimuli via calcium signaling (Ostrow and Sachs, 2005).
  • Substrate stiffness is also known to shift cell differentiation in mesenchymal stem cells to be neurogenic, myogenic, or osteogenic (Engler et al., 2006).
  • In vivo studies which focus on the effects of electrode tethering have shown that untethered implants reduce the extent of the glial scar (Biran et al., 2007; Kim et al., 2004; Subbaroyan, 2007)
  • Parylene, polymide, and PDMS still each have moduli 6 orders of mangitude larger than that of the brain.
  • In some of their plots, immune response is higher around the nanocomposites!
    • Could be that their implant is still too large / stiff?
  • Note that recent research shows that vitemin may have neuroprotective effects --
    • Research has linked vimentin expression to rapid neurite extension in response to damage (Levin et al., 2009)
    • NG2+ cells that express vimentin have been proposed to support repair of central nervous system (CNS) damage, and stabilize axons in response to dieback from ED1+ cells (Alonso, 2005; Nishiyama, 2007; Busch et al., 2010)
  • Prior work (Frampton et al., 2010 PMID-20336824[2]) hypothesizes that a more compact GFAP response increases the impedance of an electrode which may decrease the quality of electrode recordings.

____References____

[0] Harris JP, Capadona JR, Miller RH, Healy BC, Shanmuganathan K, Rowan SJ, Weder C, Tyler DJ, Mechanically adaptive intracortical implants improve the proximity of neuronal cell bodies.J Neural Eng 8:6, 066011 (2011 Dec)
[1] Harris JP, Hess AE, Rowan SJ, Weder C, Zorman CA, Tyler DJ, Capadona JR, In vivo deployment of mechanically adaptive nanocomposites for intracortical microelectrodes.J Neural Eng 8:4, 046010 (2011 Aug)
[2] Frampton JP, Hynd MR, Shuler ML, Shain W, Effects of glial cells on electrode impedance recorded from neuralprosthetic devices in vitro.Ann Biomed Eng 38:3, 1031-47 (2010 Mar)

{1208}
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ref: Lewitus-2011.08 tags: dissolving polymer electrodes histology degrading date: 01-25-2013 01:31 gmt revision:2 [1] [0] [head]

PMID-21609850[0] The fate of ultrafast degrading polymeric implants in the brain.

  • Tyrosene-derived terpolymer (protein?) dissolves within hours & was re-absorbed.
  • Second terpolymer degrades quickly but is not resorbed.
    • This type resulted in continuous glial activation and loss of neural tissue compared to first.
  • Makes sense, not unexpected.

____References____

[0] Lewitus DY, Smith KL, Shain W, Bolikal D, Kohn J, The fate of ultrafast degrading polymeric implants in the brain.Biomaterials 32:24, 5543-50 (2011 Aug)

{1026}
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ref: Thelin-2011.01 tags: histology MEA tether tissue response malmo lund date: 01-24-2013 22:17 gmt revision:5 [4] [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-21298109[0] Implant size and fixation mode strongly influence tissue reactions in the CNS.

  • Overview: tethering and size both increase immune response, and causes continued GFAP activity.
    • An untethered 50um electrode exhibited very weak inflammatory response after 12 weeks.
      • Suggesting that a small electrode can move with the brain.
  • Tethering in their context means affixed rigidly to the bone.
    • Small-diameter, untethered implants cause the smallest tissue reactions.
    • Likely that this scales.
  • Stice et al 2007 {1111} -- GFAP expression was significantly smaller for 12 um diameter implants than 25um implants @ 4 weeks.
  • They used 50um and 200um stainless steel implants.
    • implants glued to micromanipulator using gelatine
  • 24 rats.
  • Much more GFAP and ED1 actviity in tethered implants; NEuN neural density about the same.
  • 50um implant had a higher NeuN + count.
  • Regarding implantation: not sure. Have to find a reference for stab wounds (where the inserter is retracted).

____References____

[0] Thelin J, Jörntell H, Psouni E, Garwicz M, Schouenborg J, Danielsen N, Linsmeier CE, Implant size and fixation mode strongly influence tissue reactions in the CNS.PLoS One 6:1, e16267 (2011 Jan 26)

{1111}
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ref: Stice-2007.06 tags: electrodes recording small rats S1 PGA histology GFAP date: 01-24-2013 21:07 gmt revision:9 [8] [7] [6] [5] [4] [3] [head]

PMID-17409479[0] Thin microelectrodes reduce GFAP expression in the implant site in rodent somatosensory cortex.

  • Implanted 12 um and 25 um polymide coated stainless steel
    • Wires coated with poly-glycolic acid (PGA) to facilitate implantation.
  • Only looked to 4 weeks.
  • 12 um implants significantly less GFAP (astrocyte) reactivity at 4 weeks, no difference at 2 weeks (figure 9 & 10).
    • B = bare, P = PGA coated.
  • Can use to bolster the idea that smaller implants are less irritating.

____References____

[0] Stice P, Gilletti A, Panitch A, Muthuswamy J, Thin microelectrodes reduce GFAP expression in the implant site in rodent somatosensory cortex.J Neural Eng 4:2, 42-53 (2007 Jun)

{737}
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ref: Biran-2005.09 tags: microelectrode Michigan probe glia tissue response electrode immune histology MEA Biran date: 01-24-2013 20:49 gmt revision:5 [4] [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-16045910[0] Neuronal cell loss accompanies the brain tissue response to chronically implanted silicon microelectrode arrays.

  • See also {1190} (wow, I'm redundant!)
  • Important point: ED1 up-regulation and neuronal loss were not observed in microelectrode stab controls, indicating that the phenotype did not result from the initial mechanical trauma of electrode implantation, but was associated with the foreign body response.
    • CD68 = ED1 is a marker for microglia and other macrophages. (wikipedia article is informative).
    • GFAP = glial fibrillary acidic protein, marker for astrocytes.
  • Recording failure is caused by chronic inflammation (mostly activated microglia) at the microelectrode brain tissue interface.
  • Only tested response 2 and 4 weeks after implantation. Makes sense for stab wound, but didn't the want to see a longer term response? Or do their electrodes just not last that long?
  • What did they coat the silicon probes in?
  • Used silastic to shock-mount their floating electrodes, but this apparently made no difference compared to conventional dental cement and bone screw mounting.
  • Suggest that chronic inflammatory response may be related to the absorption of fibrogen and complement to the surface of the device (device should not be porous?), the subsequent release of pro-inflammatory and cytotoxic cytokines by activated microphages, and the persistence of activated macrophages around materials which cannot be broken down.
    • Well then, how do you make the electrodes biochemically / biologically 'invisible'?
    • Persistently activated microglia are found around insoluble plaques in AD (plaques that cannot be / are not removed from the brain via proteolysis. Microglia form 'glitter cells' when they engulf undigestible stubstances). This has been termed 'frustrated phagocytosis', which results in increased secretion of proinflamatory cytokines that directly or indirectly cause neuronal death.
  • Significant reductions in neurofiliament reactivity was seen up to 230um from the microelectrode interface; this was not seen for stab wounds. Maximum recording distance is about 130um; 100um more reasonable in normal conditions.
  • Accumulating evidence from postmortem analysis of patients implanted with DBS electrodes reveals that chronic neuroinflamation is part of the response to such (duller, larger) implants as well. They have seen cell loss up to 1mm fromt the electrode surface here.

____References____

[0] Biran R, Martin DC, Tresco PA, Neuronal cell loss accompanies the brain tissue response to chronically implanted silicon microelectrode arrays.Exp Neurol 195:1, 115-26 (2005 Sep)

{1199}
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ref: -0 tags: histology atryocytes immune response electrode arrays lund multiple exacerbate date: 01-24-2013 19:56 gmt revision:1 [0] [head]

PMID-23091629 Multiple implants do not aggravate the tissue reaction in rat brain.

  • After six weeks, the astrocytic scar surrounding the middle out of five implants was significantly smaller compared to the single contralateral implant, suggesting that an intrahemispheric interaction might be taking place, reducing the astrocytic response around the central implant.
  • Weak (?) staining for ED1 in this study?
  • -- after 6 weeks.
  • Thought: every paper has a different method for quantify immune response, GFAP staining in this case.

{1024}
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ref: COLLIAS-1957.05 tags: histology microelectrode vasulature date: 01-23-2013 23:56 gmt revision:4 [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-13429398[0] Histopathological changes produced by implanted electrodes in cat brains; comparison with histopathological changes in human and experimental puncture wounds.

  • Quite a good and overcomplete / long article -- fully describes their result of implanting bundles of 0.005" varnished steel wires into the brains of cats.
    • Saw hemorrhagic necrosis, necrosis from edema, and eventual encapsulation and collapse of capilaries around the chronic implant. All things that we still have to contend with.
  • From [1]: ... For single penetrating electrodes into cat cortex, Collias and Manuelidis noted and increase in hemorrhagic damage near electrode tracks of the cortex nearest the point of electrode entry into the pia.
  • They also reported that the damage appeared to be randomly distributed among the implants, which they attributed to differences in local vasculature.
  • The toxicity of certain metals, namely, platinum, platinum-8% tungsten, platinum-10% rhodium, platinum-10% iridium, platinum-10% nickel, platinized platinum, a gold-nickel-chromium alloy, a gold-palladium-rhodium alloy, a chromium-nickel-molybdenum alloy (Vitallium), stainless steel, silver, rhenium, and gold, was evaluated histologically following chronic implantation for 2 months in the brains of cats. Of the above metals, all but silver were found to be nontoxic. Boron was also evaluated and found to be nontoxic.

____References____

[0] COLLIAS JC, MANUELIDIS EE, Histopathological changes produced by implanted electrodes in cat brains; comparison with histopathological changes in human and experimental puncture wounds.J Neurosurg 14:3, 302-28 (1957 May)
[1] Rousche PJ, Normann RA, Chronic recording capability of the Utah Intracortical Electrode Array in cat sensory cortex.J Neurosci Methods 82:1, 1-15 (1998 Jul 1)

{1102}
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ref: Gilletti-2006.09 tags: electrode micromotion histology GFAP variable reluctance date: 01-04-2013 02:28 gmt revision:2 [1] [0] [head]

PMID-16921202[0] Brain micromotion around implants in the rodent somatosensory cortex.

  • Used a differential variable reluctance transducer (DVRT) in adult rats (n = 6) to monitor micromotion normal to the somatosensory cortex surface
    • Reluctance e.g. AC inductance varied with a floating bobbin (or so -- they do not list the details of this COTS device).
  • Pulsatile surface micromotion was observed to be in the order of 10-30 um due to pressure changes during respiration and 2-4 um due to vascular pulsatility.
  • Large inward displacements of brain tissue between 10-60 um were observed in n = 3 animals immediately following the administration of anesthesia

____References____

[0] Gilletti A, Muthuswamy J, Brain micromotion around implants in the rodent somatosensory cortex.J Neural Eng 3:3, 189-95 (2006 Sep)

{1190}
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ref: Biran-2005.09 tags: Tresco histology chronic implantation astrocytes microglia date: 01-04-2013 02:28 gmt revision:3 [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-16045910[0] Neuronal cell loss accompanies the brain tissue response to chronically implanted silicon microelectrode arrays.

  • We observed persistent ED1 immunoreactivity around implanted silicon microelectrode arrays implanted in adult rat cortex that was accompanied by a significant reduction in nerve fiber density and nerve cell bodies in the tissue immediately surrounding the implanted silicon microelectrode arrays.
  • We found that explanted electrodes were covered with ED1/MAC-1 immunoreactive cells and that the cells released MCP-1 and TNF-a under serum-free conditions in vitro.
  • See also [1] and [2]
  • Electrodes: Michigan type, 5mm long, 200um wide tapering to 30um, 15um thick at the shank tapering to 2um.
    • Show that the chronic response is markedly different than acute stab wounds.
    • "Stab wounds resulted in comparatively minimal neurofilament loss at 2 weeks (A) and no apparent loss by 4 weeks".
    • "The number of neuronal bodies is reduced in the area adjacent to microelectrodes (B, D) but appears unaltered surrounding stab wound lesions (A, C; lesion site in center of each image)."
  • Includes details of immunostaining, which could be useful.

____References____

[0] Biran R, Martin DC, Tresco PA, Neuronal cell loss accompanies the brain tissue response to chronically implanted silicon microelectrode arrays.Exp Neurol 195:1, 115-26 (2005 Sep)
[1] Szarowski DH, Andersen MD, Retterer S, Spence AJ, Isaacson M, Craighead HG, Turner JN, Shain W, Brain responses to micro-machined silicon devices.Brain Res 983:1-2, 23-35 (2003 Sep 5)
[2] Gilletti A, Muthuswamy J, Brain micromotion around implants in the rodent somatosensory cortex.J Neural Eng 3:3, 189-95 (2006 Sep)

{923}
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ref: Freire-2011.01 tags: Nicolelis BMI electrodes immune respones immunohistochemistry chronic arrays rats 2011 MEA histology date: 06-29-2012 01:20 gmt revision:5 [4] [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-22096594[0] Comprehensive analysis of tissue preservation and recording quality from chronic multielectrode implants.

  • Says what might be expected: tungsten microelectrode arrays work, though the quality gradually declines over 6 months.
  • Histological markers correlated well with recording performance.
  • Shows persistent glial activation around electrode sites + cell body hypertropy.
    • Suggest that loss in recording quality may be due to glial encapsulation.
  • References
    • Szarowski et al 2003 {1028}
    • Ward et al 2009
  • Histology:
    • NADPH-d: nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase, via beta-NADP
    • CO: cytochrome oxidase, via diamnibenzidine DAB, cytochrome c and catalase.
      • both good for staining cortical layers; applied in a standard buffered solution and monitored to prevent overstaining.
  • Immunohistochemistry:
    • Activated microglia with ED-1 antibody.
    • Astrocytes labeled with glial fibrillary acid protein.
    • IEG with an antibody against EGR-1, 'a well-known marker of calcium dependent neuronal activity'
    • Neurofilament revealed using a monoclonal NF-M antibody.
    • Caspace-3 with the associated antibody
    • Details the steps for immunostaining -- wash, blocknig buffer, addition of the antibody in diluted blocking solution (skim milk) overnight, wash again, incubate in biotinylated secondary antibody, wash again, incubate in avidin-biotin-peroxidase solution.
    • Flourescent immunohistochemistry had biotynlation replaced with alexa Fluor 488-conjugated horse anti-mouse and Alexa Fluor 594-conjugated goat anti-rabbit overnight.

____References____

[0] Freire MA, Morya E, Faber J, Santos JR, Guimaraes JS, Lemos NA, Sameshima K, Pereira A, Ribeiro S, Nicolelis MA, Comprehensive analysis of tissue preservation and recording quality from chronic multielectrode implants.PLoS One 6:11, e27554 (2011)

{307}
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ref: Rousche-1998.07 tags: BMI Utah cat Normann recording electrode MEA histology date: 06-29-2012 01:12 gmt revision:9 [8] [7] [6] [5] [4] [3] [head]

PMID-10223510 Chronic recording capability of the Utah Intracortical Electrode Array in cat sensory cortex.

  • Focus on (surprisingly) chronic recording from the utah array: they want to demonstrate that it works.
  • Platinum coating.
  • insulated with 2-3um polymide.
  • 10 cats, 12 arrays: 2 in S1, 8 in auditory ctx, 2 V1.
  • 11 electrodes connected in each array.
  • After a 6-month implant period, 60% of implanted arrays could still record 'some type of activity'.
  • They were completely targeting neuroprostheses.
    • But acknowledge that 'the presence of fibrous encapsulation and chronic astrogliosis suggests that more research is necessary before the UIEA can be uses as a cornerstone of a neuroprosthetic device for human use.
      • And yet they went through with the human trials?
  • Electrode impedance gave no hint as to the ability of a given electrode to record neural units: many electrodes with average impedance could not record neural activity.
  • Impedances generally decreased , which is not unusual (Schmidt and Bak, 1976).
    • Likely that the polymide had become permeated with water vapor to and equilibrium point. (rather than pinhole leaks or water permeation).
  • Quiet amplifiers: 2uv pk-pk.
  • No significant trend in background activity was noted over the implant durations.
  • In nearly every cat, the dura above the electrode array adhered to the bone flap, and the electrode array adhered to the dura. Therefore, when the bone flap was removed, the UIEA was concurrently explanted from the cortex.
    • Similar to Hoogerwerf and Wise 1994 {1025}
    • The explanted UIEAs typically had become encapsulated, the encapsulation was the cause of the cortical depression.
    • Only 1 did not become encapsulated in dura.
    • This encapsulation explains the gradually varying recording properties -- the electrodes were moving out of the brain.
    • "The capsule which formed around the substrate of the UIEA was usually continuous with the dura, which was enmeshed directly to the overlying skull. The encapsulated array therefore had no freedom of movement with respect to the skull, and this may have caused local trauma which reduced the possibility of recording neural activity. This relative micromovement between the fixed array and the ‘floating’ cortical tissue may also be responsible for sustaining continued growth of the encapsulation as described above."
    • Have tried putting teflon on the top of the Utah array -- did this work?
  • Two UIEAs were not found near the cortical surface -- these two arrays were totally removed from the leptomeningeal space. although originally implanted into the cortex beneath the dura, at the time of sacrafice these arrays were found above the repaired dura, and the implanted cortex showed no evicence of cortical implant.
  • Some electrodes healthy; other showed chronic inflammation.
  • General and intense inflamation in the upper layers of cortex even on their best-performing array; no guarantee that this ctx was working properly, as it is heavily compressed with fibroblasts.
  • Regarding vascluature, see {1024}.
  • Say that the largest impediment is the formation of a capsule around the implant. (Do not mention issue of infection; I guess cats have strong immune systems as well?)
  • Rather good biological discussion and conclusion. worth a re-read. "We currently recommend that the UIEA be used for acute and short-term applications."
    • Not too many follow-ups re teflon or fixing the encapsulation problem: See {1026}
      • Indeed, {1027} doesn't even cite this! Too disastrous?

____References____

{1053}
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ref: Leach-2010.02 tags: BMI challenges histology biocompatibility review date: 01-16-2012 18:22 gmt revision:4 [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-20161810[0] Bridging the Divide between Neuroprosthetic Design, Tissue Engineering and Neurobiology

  • Neuroprosthetic device technology has seen major advances in recent years but the full potential of these devices remains unrealized due to outstanding challenges, such as the ability to record consistently over long periods of time.
  • Discuss promising new treatments based on developmental and cancer biology (?)
  • Suggest controlled drug release as the tissue is healing. Makes sense.

____References____

[0] Leach JB, Achyuta AK, Murthy SK, Bridging the Divide between Neuroprosthetic Design, Tissue Engineering and Neurobiology.Front Neuroeng 2no Issue 18 (2010 Feb 8)

{240}
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ref: MolinaLuna-2007.03 tags: ICMS microstimulation cortical thin-film electrodes histology MEA date: 01-03-2012 22:54 gmt revision:2 [1] [0] [head]

PMID-17178423[0] Cortical stimulation mapping using epidurally implanted thin-film microelectrode arrays.

  • they claim that thin-film electrodes are better than microelectrode arrays, as they show less evidence of cortical damage.
    • thin-film electrodes show higher reproducability
    • more accurate spatial arrangement.
  • epidural stimulation (they were implanted between the dura and skull)

____References____

[0] Molina-Luna K, Buitrago MM, Hertler B, Schubring M, Haiss F, Nisch W, Schulz JB, Luft AR, Cortical stimulation mapping using epidurally implanted thin-film microelectrode arrays.J Neurosci Methods 161:1, 118-25 (2007 Mar 30)