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[0] Porada I, Bondar I, Spatz WB, Kruger J, Rabbit and monkey visual cortex: more than a year of recording with up to 64 microelectrodes.J Neurosci Methods 95:1, 13-28 (2000 Jan 31)

[0] Csicsvari J, Henze DA, Jamieson B, Harris KD, Sirota A, Bartho P, Wise KD, Buzsaki G, Massively parallel recording of unit and local field potentials with silicon-based electrodes.J Neurophysiol 90:2, 1314-23 (2003 Aug)

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ref: -2016 tags: Kozai carbon fiber microelectrodes JNE PEDOT PSS pTS date: 04-27-2017 01:42 gmt revision:6 [5] [4] [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-27705958 Chronic in vivo stability assessment of carbon fiber microelectrode arrays.

  • showed excellent recording characteristics and nearly zero glial scarring.
  • 6.4um carbon fiber + 800nm parylene-C = 8.4um.
    • Cytec Thoronel T-650 CF, Youngs modulus = 255 GPa, tensile strength = 4.28 GPa, PAN-based.
  • Everything protected with our wonderful phenol epoxy 353NDT, heat-cure.
  • Used two coating solutions:
    • Solution of 0.01 M 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (483028, Sigma-Aldrich, St. Louis, MO): 0.1 M sodium p-toluenesulfonate (152536, Sigma-Aldrich, St. Louis, MO).
      • pTS is not that dissimilar from it's alkyl cousin, SPS, {1353}. Likely a soapy chemical due to the opposed methyl and sulfonic acid group; benzine will take up less room in the polymer c.f. SDS & may lower the oxidation potential of EDOT.
      • Tosylates have been explored as a EDOT counterion : PMID-22383043 Characterization of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):tosylate conductive polymer microelectrodes for transmitter detection. and PEDOT-TMA
    • Solution was composed of 0.01 M 3,4-ethylene-dioxythiophene (483028, Sigma-Aldrich, St. Louis, MO):0.1 M polystyrene sulfonate (m.w. 70.000, 222271000, Acros, NJ).
    • For each solution the electrodeposition was carried out by applying 100 pA/channel for 600 s to form a layer of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):sodium p-toluenesulfonate (PEDOT:pTS) or poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS).
      • Weird, would use voltage control here..
  • According to works by Green et al [45] and Hukins et al [46], equation (1) can be used to determine the aging time that
the fibers have undergone: t 37=t TQ10 T37)/10 where t 37 is the simulated aging time at 37 °C, t T is the amount of real time that the samples have been kept at the elevated temperature, T , and Q10 is an aging factor that is equal to 2, according to ASTM guidelines for polymer aging [47].
  • Show > 2MOhm impedance of the small-area electrodes. At the aging endpoint, PEDOT:pTS had about half the impedance of PEDOT:PSS.
    • 4M PSS, 7M pTS, both plated down to ~ 130k initial, went up to 2M pSS, 840k pTS.
  • Recording capability quite stellar
  • Likewise for the glial response.

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ref: -0 tags: polyimide electrodes thermosonic bonding Stieglitz adhesion delamination date: 03-06-2017 21:58 gmt revision:7 [6] [5] [4] [3] [2] [1] [head]

IEEE-6347149 (pdf) Improved polyimide thin-film electrodes for neural implants 2012

  • Tested adhesion to Pt / SiC using accelerated aging in saline solution.
  • Targeted at retinal prostheses.
  • Layer stack:
    • 50nm SiC deposited through PECVD @ 100C using SPS, with low frequency RF modulation.
    • 100nm Pt
    • 100nm Au
    • 100nm Pt
      • These layers will alloy during cure, and hence reduce stress.
    • 30nm SiC
    • 10nm DLC (not needed, imho; PI sticks exceptionally well to clean SiC)
  • Recent studies have concluded that adhesion to PI is through carbon bindings and not through oxide formation.
    • Adhesion of polyimide to amorphous diamond-like carbon and SiC deteriorates at a minimal rate.
  • Delamination is caused by residual stress, which is not only inevetable but a major driving force for cracking in thin films.
    • Different CTE in layer stack -> different contraction when cooling from process temperature.
  • Platinum, which evaporates at 1770C, and is deposited ~100C (photoresists only withstand ~115C) results in a high-stress interface.
    • Pt - Carbon bonds only occur above 1000C
  • After 9 and 13 days of incubation the probes with 400 nm and 300nm of SiC, respectively, which were not tempered, showed complete delamination of the Pt from the SiC.
    • 60C, 0.9 M NaCl, 1 year.
    • The SiC remained attached to the PI.
      • Tempering: repeated treatment at 450C for 15 min in a N2 atmosphere.
    • All other probes remained stable.
  • Notably, used thermosonic bonding to the PI films, using sputtered (seed layer) then 12um electroplated Au.
  • Also: fully cured the base layer PI film.
  • Used oxygen plasma de-scum after patterning with resists to get better SiC adhesion to PI.
    • And better inter-layer adhesion (fully cured the first polyimide layer @ 450C).
  • Conclusion: "The fact that none of the tempered samples delaminated even after ~5 years of lifetime (extrapolated for 37 C) shows a tremendous increase in adhesion.

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ref: Gilgunn-2012 tags: kozai neural recording electrodes compliant parylene flexible dissolve date: 02-24-2017 19:14 gmt revision:5 [4] [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

IEEE-6170092 (pdf) An ultra-compliant, scalable neural probe with molded biodissolvable delivery vehicle

    • Optical coherence tomography is cool.
  • Large footprint - 150 or 300um, 135um thick (13500 or 40500 um^2; c.f. tungsten needle 1963 (50um) or 490 (25um) um^2.)
  • Delivery vehicle is fabricated from biodissolvable carboxy-methylcellulose (CMC).
    • Device dissolves within three minutes of implantation.
    • Yet stiff enough to penetrate the dura of rats (with what degree of dimpling?)
    • Lithographic patterning process pretty clever, actually.
    • Parylene-X is ~ 1.1 um thick.
    • 500nm Pt is patterned via ion milling with a photoresist mask.
    • Use thin 20nm Cr etch mask for both DRIE (STS ICP) and parylene etch.
  • Probes are tiny -- 10um wide, 2.7um thick, coated in parylene-X.
  • CMC polymer tends to bend and warp due to stress -- must be clamped in a special jig.
  • No histology. Follow-up?

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ref: -0 tags: gold micrograin recording electrodes electroplating impedance date: 10-17-2016 20:28 gmt revision:5 [4] [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-23071004 Gold nanograin microelectrodes for neuroelectronic interfaces.

  • We report a single-cell sized microelectrode, which has unique gold nanograin structures, using a simple electrochemical deposition method.
  • Fabricated microelectrode had a sunflower shape with 1-5 (um of micropetals along the circumference of the microelectrode and 500 nm nanograins at the center.
  • The nanograin electrodes had 69-fold decrease of impedance and 10-fold increase in electrical stimulation capability compared to unmodified flat gold microelectrodes.
  • images/1270_1.pdf pdf
  • The deposition was conducted with an aqueous solution containing 25 mM HAuCl (HAuCl · 3H O, Sigma-Aldrich, MO, 4 4 2USA) and 20 g/L polyvinylpyrrolidone (surfactant, stabilizing agent)

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ref: Linsmeier-2011.01 tags: histology lund electrodes immune response fine flexible review Thelin date: 12-08-2015 23:57 gmt revision:6 [5] [4] [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-21867803[0] Can histology solve the riddle of the nonfunctioning electrode? Factors influencing the biocompatibility of brain machine interfaces.

  • We show results from an ultrathin multichannel wire electrode that has been implanted in the rat cerebral cortex for 1 year.
    • 12um Pt-Ir wires in a 200um bundle coated with gelatin. See PMID-20551508[1]
    • Electrode was left in the rat cortex for 354 days
    • no clear GFAP staining or ED1 positive cells at the electrode tips.
  • To improve biocompatibility of implanted electrodes, we would like to suggest that free-floating, very small, flexible, and, in time, wireless electrodes would elicit a diminished cell encapsulation.
  • Suggest standardized methods for the electrode design, the electrode implantation method, and the analyses of cell reactions after implantation
  • somewhat of a review -- Stice, Biran 2005 [2] 2007 [3].
  • 50um is the recording distance Purcell 2009.
  • See also [4]
  • Study of neuronal density and ED1 reactivity / GFAP:
    • Even at 12 weeks the correlation between NeuN density and GFAP / ED1 was small -- r 2=0.12
    • Note that DAPI labels many unknown cells in the vicinity of the electrode.

____References____

[0] Linsmeier CE, Thelin J, Danielsen N, Can histology solve the riddle of the nonfunctioning electrode? Factors influencing the biocompatibility of brain machine interfaces.Prog Brain Res 194no Issue 181-9 (2011)
[1] Lind G, Linsmeier CE, Thelin J, Schouenborg J, Gelatine-embedded electrodes--a novel biocompatible vehicle allowing implantation of highly flexible microelectrodes.J Neural Eng 7:4, 046005 (2010 Aug)
[2] Biran R, Martin DC, Tresco PA, Neuronal cell loss accompanies the brain tissue response to chronically implanted silicon microelectrode arrays.Exp Neurol 195:1, 115-26 (2005 Sep)
[3] Biran R, Martin DC, Tresco PA, The brain tissue response to implanted silicon microelectrode arrays is increased when the device is tethered to the skull.J Biomed Mater Res A 82:1, 169-78 (2007 Jul)
[4] Thelin J, Jörntell H, Psouni E, Garwicz M, Schouenborg J, Danielsen N, Linsmeier CE, Implant size and fixation mode strongly influence tissue reactions in the CNS.PLoS One 6:1, e16267 (2011 Jan 26)

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ref: -0 tags: polyimide silicon carbide adhesion DBS syle electrodes date: 07-22-2015 18:01 gmt revision:0 [head]

PMID-25571176 Fabrication and characterization of a high-resolution neural probe for stereoelectroencephalography and single neuron recording.

  • Layer stack:
    • 5um PI (UBE U-varnish S)
    • 50nm SiC
      • Deposited at 100C.
    • 300nm Pt
    • 30nm SiC
    • 10nm DLC
    • 5um PI
      • Cured at 450C
    • 100nm Al hard mask (removed)
    • Cytop dry adhesion layer
      • softbake to remove solvent,
      • then hardbake at 290C for 4 hours to anneal the PI and adhere the Cytop to it.

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ref: -0 tags: kevlar electrodes flexible polymer 12um McNaughton Utah date: 10-11-2014 00:19 gmt revision:0 [head]

PMID-8982987 Metallized polymer fibers as leadwires and intrafascicular microelectrodes

  • McNaughton TG1, Horch KW.
  • Ti/W, Au, Pt metalization via sputtering.
  • 12um core diamater.
  • demonstrate 8 month reliability.
  • 1um dipped silicone elastomer insulation.
  • note difficulty in manufactuing the fibers. No kidding!
  • Tensile strength the same as a 25um Pt-Ir wire, 90x more flexible.

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ref: Nordhausen-1994.02 tags: Utah array electrodes optimization date: 08-14-2014 01:24 gmt revision:2 [1] [0] [head]

PMID-8180807[0] Optimizing recording capabilities of the Utah Intracortical Electrode Array.

  • Nordhausen, Rousch, Normann (1993)
  • Originally it was designed for stimulation in a visual prosthesis.
  • Thought that the large surface area would securely anchor it to the cortex
    • Turns out you need to put gore-tex on top to keep it from being expelled.
  • Varied the exposed electrode tip to determine the optimum area.
  • Oldschool computer plots ...

____References____

[0] Nordhausen CT, Rousche PJ, Normann RA, Optimizing recording capabilities of the Utah Intracortical Electrode Array.Brain Res 637:1-2, 27-36 (1994 Feb 21)

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ref: -0 tags: polyimide platinum electrodes Spain longitudinal intrafasicular adhesion delamination date: 10-05-2013 22:24 gmt revision:4 [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-17278585 Assessment of biocompatibility of chronically implanted polyimide and platinum intrafascicular electrodes. 2007

  • Designed platinum/polyimide longitudinal intrafasicular electrodes (LIFEs)
    • 25um PT/Ir, insulated to 60-75um diameter. PT/IR has a young's modulus of 202 Gpa.
      • Plated with platinum black under sonication, as this forms a tougher surface than without sonication.
      • See also: PMID-20485478 Improving impedance of implantable microwire multi-electrode arrays by ultrasonic electroplating of durable platinum black. Desai SA, Rolston JD, Guo L, Potter SM. 2010
    • Polyimide PI2611, 10um thick, 50mm long, 220um wide in the electrode segment.
  • Implanted into rat sciatic nerve for 3 months.
  • These electrodes have been tested in people for two days:
    • Electrical stimulation through the implanted electrodes elicited graded sensations of touch, joint movement, and position, referring to the missing limb. This suggested that peripheral nerve interfaces could be used to provide amputees with prosthetic limbs with sensory feedback and volitional control that is more natural than what is possible with current myoelectric and body-powered prostheses.
  • CMAPs = compound muscle action potentials.
  • CNAPs = compound nerve action potentials.
  • Platinum wire LIFE performed very similarly to the thin-film polyimide LIFE in most all tests, with slightly higher potentials recorded by the larger polyimide probe.
  • 'Higher encapsulation with the polyimide probes! Geometry?
  • However, the polyimide LIFEs induced less functional decline than the wire LIFEs.
  • Other polyimide studies [14] [16] [24] -- one of which they observed a 70% reduction of tensile strength after 11 months of implantation.
    • [14] F. J. Rodríguez, D. Ceballos, M. Schüttler, E. Valderrama, T. Stieglitz, and X. Navarro, “Polyimide cuff electrodes for peripheral nerve stimulation,” J. Neurosci. Meth., vol. 98, pp. 105–118, 2000.
    • [16] N. Lago, D. Ceballos, F. J. Rodríguez, T. Stieglitz, and X. Navarro, “Long term assessment of axonal regeneration through polyimide regenerative electrodes to interface the peripheral nerve,” Biomaterials, vol. 26, pp. 2021–2031, 2005.
    • [24] M. Schuettler, K. P. Koch, and T. Stieglitz, “Investigations on explanted micromachined nerve electrodes,” in Proc. 8th Annu. Int. Conf. Int. Functional Electrical Stimulation Soc., Maroochydore, Australia, 2003, pp. 306–310.
      • The technology of sandwiching a metallization layer between two layers of polyimide seems to be suitable, because no delamination of the polyimide layers was observed even after 11 months. The right choice of metals for building the electrical conductive elements of the microelectrodes is crucial. Ti/Au/Ti/Pt layers tend to flake off from polyimide while delamination of Ti/Pt layers was not observed. However, adhesion of Ti/Pt layers was investigated after 2.5 months of implantation while Ti/Au/Ti/Pt layers were exposed after 11 months to the biological system. In previous research projects, surgeons also reported on delamination of Ti/Au layers from polyimide substrate after three months. Unfortunately, we had no possibility of inspecting these microelectrodes in our laboratory.
      • See also {1250}

{1244}
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ref: -0 tags: polyimide electrodes ecog japan photosensitive date: 06-28-2013 01:50 gmt revision:0 [head]

PMID-22719725 Photosensitive-polyimide based method for fabricating various neural electrode architectures

  • Yasuhiro X. Kato,1,* Shigeto Furukawa,2 Kazuyuki Samejima,1 Naoyuki Hironaka,2 and Makio Kashino2
  • many typos in this paper (not that I should talk..) Yet still, it's informative.
  • 12um thick photosensitive polyimide + Cr/Au fabrication.
  • Wet etch (photodeveloper).
  • Wet release (ferric chloride) from glass substrate.
  • Soldered a connector to the polyimide w/ stiffener.
  • Note that polyimide tends to shrink (up to 29%) during baking, unlike parylene!
  • Suggest 20-40um diameter neural recording sites; they did not coat.

{1193}
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ref: Prasad-2012.1 tags: tungsten microwire electrodes histology insulation failure sanchez microwire tungsten date: 06-27-2013 22:40 gmt revision:12 [11] [10] [9] [8] [7] [6] [head]

PMID-23010756[0] Comprehensive characterization and failure modes of tungsten microwire arrays in chronic neural implants.

  • c.f. [1]
  • microwire implant, durations that ranged from acute to up to 9 months in 25 rats.
  • First 2-3 weeks electrode impedance + recording quality fluctuated the most widely.
  • Electrode recording site deterioration continued for the long-term animals as insulation damage occurred and recording surface became more recessed over time.
  • Activated microglia were found near electrode tracts in all chronic animals.
    • High ferritin expression, intraparenchymal bleeding, microglial degeneration suggesting presence of excessive oxidative stress via Fenton chemistry.
      • Wikipedia: Free iron is toxic to cells as it acts as a catalyst in the formation of free radicals from reactive oxygen species via the Fenton Reaction.[11] Hence vertebrates use an elaborate set of protective mechanisms to bind iron in various tissue compartments.
  • Ferritin expression sometimes associated with blebbing / cytorrhexis. (in figures 7-8)
    • Interestingly, during the first few hours after implantation many microglial cells are undergoing cytoplasmic fragmentation (cytorrhexis) which indicates ongoing degeneration of these cells as their cytoplasm literally breaks apart. Cytorrhexis has been previously observed in the aged human brain where it becomes particular prominent in subjects with Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Could not discriminate abiotic (insulation, recording site size) and biotic (inflammatory response) causes of failure.
    • Microglial response not correlated with prolonged performance.
  • Tungsten TDT microwire arrays. 50um diameter, 10um polyimide insulation.
  • SEM imaging pre and prior implantation.
  • Antibodies marking microglia:
    • Iba1 marks all microglia.
    • ED1 stain against CD68 to identify active macrophages [80], but not necessarily all activated microglia since many activated cells are not engaged in phagocytosis and thus are ED1-negative.
    • Anti-ferritin staining to identify those microglia involved in the sequestration of free iron that may leak as a result of BBB compromize.
      • Issue: ferritin is expressed in all tissues ..
    • OX-6 to identify antigen-presenting MHC-II (immune) cells, e.g. microglia or blood-borne immune cells.
  • Found the immunohistoheamistry not terribly convincing.
    • Above, arrows show withdrawn electrode tips.
  • Working with the FDA to promote good laboratory practice (GLP) and good manufacturing practice (GMP). Can mention the same.
  • No evidence of infection in rats.
    • Not true in monkeys..

____References____

[0] Prasad A, Xue QS, Sankar V, Nishida T, Shaw G, Streit WJ, Sanchez JC, Comprehensive characterization and failure modes of tungsten microwire arrays in chronic neural implants.J Neural Eng 9:5, 056015 (2012 Oct)
[1] Freire MA, Morya E, Faber J, Santos JR, Guimaraes JS, Lemos NA, Sameshima K, Pereira A, Ribeiro S, Nicolelis MA, Comprehensive analysis of tissue preservation and recording quality from chronic multielectrode implants.PLoS One 6:11, e27554 (2011)

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ref: -0 tags: optogenetics micro LED flexible electrodes date: 06-27-2013 19:31 gmt revision:8 [7] [6] [5] [4] [3] [2] [head]

PMID-23580530 Injectable, cellular-scale optoelectronics with applications for wireless optogenetics.

  • Supplementary materials
  • 21 authors, University Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Tufts, China, Northwestern, Miami ..
  • GaN blue and green LEDs fabricated on a flexible substrate with stiff inserter.
    • Inserter is released in 15 min with a dissolving silk fibrin.
    • 250um thick SU-8 epoxy, reverse photocured on a glass slide.
  • GaN LEDS fabricated on a sapphire substrate & transfer printed via modified Karl-Suss mask aligner.
    • See supplemental materials for the intricate steps.
    • LEDs are 50um x 50um x 6.75um
  • Have integrated:
    • Temperature sensor (Pt serpentine resistor) / heater.
    • inorganic photodetector (IPD)
      • ultrathin silicon photodiode 1.25um thick, 200 x 200um^2, made on a SOI wafer
    • Pt extracellular recording electrode.
        • This insulated via 2um thick more SU-8.
  • Layers are precisely aligned and assembled via 500nm layer of epoxy.
    • Layers made of 6um or 2.5um thick mylar (a polyester -- polyethylene terephthalate (PET))
    • Layers joined with SU-8 2.
    • Wiring patterned via lift-off.
  • Powered via RF scavenging at 910 Mhz.
    • appeared to be simple, power in = light out; no data connection.
  • Tested vs control and fiber optic stimulation, staining for:
    • Tyrosine hydroxylase (makes l-DOPA)
    • c-fos, a neural activity marker
    • u-LEDs show significant activation.
  • Also tested for GFAP (astrocytes) and Iba1 (activated microglia); flexible & smaller devices had lower gliosis.
  • Next tested for behavior using a self-stimulation protocol; mice learned to self-stimulate to release DA.
  • Devices are somewhat reliable to 250 days!

{1238}
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ref: -0 tags: histology immune response otto indiana electrodes gfap inflamation transparent clearing vimentin date: 04-19-2013 23:59 gmt revision:4 [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-23428842 Chronic intracortical microelectrode arrays induce non-uniform, depth-related tissue responses.

  • Woolley AJ, Desai HA, Otto KJ.
  • One timepoint, 4 weeks.
  • Laser confocal microscopy
    • after tissue clearing (optical index of refraction matching) in a 60% sucrose solution.
  • Single-shank iridium contact silicon substrate MEA.
    • Device cut level with surface of brain after insertion.
  • Intact MEAs via device-capture histology, DHhist (Woolley et al 2011)
    • 350-450um tissue explanted with device.
    • They promote their technique.
  • Tissue surrounding microdevices exhibited two major depth-related phenomena:
    • a non-uniform microglial coating along the device length and
    • a dense mass of cells surrounding the implant in cerebral cortical layers I and II.
      • The dense mass of cells contained vimentin, a protein not typically expressed highly in CNS cells, evidence that non-CNS cells likely descended down the face of the penetrating devices from the pial surface.
        • But no Iba1 (activated microglia) per se in the tissue mass.
    • Hoe342 -- cell marker.
    • This mass was apparently consistent across animals!
    • Cells in the mass were VIM positive -- fibroblasts -- meninges?
  • low GFAP = not an astrocytic scar.
  • This study provides further evidence that a progressive invasion of non-CNS cells contributes substantially to the chronic phase of the tissue response around intracortical MEAs.
    • Again, might be from BBB distruption {1237}


This result is supported by previous papers:
  • {1193} -- microglia response not correlated to electrode failure, but correlated to ferritin immunoresponse
  • {781} -- also note that menigeal fibroblasts migrate down electrode tracts.
  • {1028} -- measured vimentin, GFAP, and ED1 (not Iba1). Found Vim+ and GFAP+, suggesting reactive astrocytes and not meningeal cells. ED1 aka CD68 is specific to macrophages and not microglia, so these may be blood-derived cells.
  • {1200} -- chronic contact with the meninges v.s intraparenchymal correlated with Vim+ encapsulation.
  • {1210} -- old paper showing the same result near surface of implant.
  • {1196} -- more against GFAP & pro BBB disruption
  • {1204} -- GFAP uncorrelated (!) with NeuN intensity
  • {307} -- all initial tests of utah arrays showed fibrous encapsulation; one array was completely explanted. This is why now they put gore-tex over the implant -- to prevent fibroblast migration (i guess).

{1237}
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ref: -0 tags: winslow Tresco 2010 BBB histology immune response microelectrodes date: 04-19-2013 23:25 gmt revision:0 [head]

PMID-19963267 Quantitative analysis of the tissue response to chronically implanted microwire electrodes in rat cortex.

  • Winslow BD, Tresco PA.
  • The spatial distribution of biomarkers associated with the foreign body response to insulated microwires placed in rat cerebral cortex was analyzed 2, 4, and 12 weeks after implantation using quantitative methods.
  • We found no evidence that reactive gliosis increases over time or that neuronal loss is progressive, we did find evidence of persistent inflammation and enhanced BBB permeability at the electrode brain tissue interface that extended over the 3 month indwelling period and that exhibited more animal to animal variability at 3 months than at 2 and 4 weeks.

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ref: -0 tags: dissertation interconnect parylene flexible electrodes date: 02-26-2013 00:30 gmt revision:2 [1] [0] [head]

http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/dissertations/AAI3444877/

  • Several different projects --
    • Stretchable PDMS electrodes
    • PDMS-parylene ECoG
    • Transmitting parallel neural data via free-space optical link
    • semi-flexible hydrogel-parylene neural electrode.
    • The parylene electrodes with selectively patterned hydrogel provide stiff mechanical properties for easy penetration into the brain tissues and subsequent flexibility after insertion upon swelling of the hydrogel.
    • advanced packaging system with using a composite inorganic parylene combination.
      • Atomic layer deposited alumina-zirconia (Al2O3–ZrO2) composite layer can provide a conformal and nano-laminated coating on parylene surface in neural packaging systems in order to improve the hermeticity for long term implantations
  • Can't get the entire PDF. annoying.

{999}
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ref: -0 tags: microelectrodes original metal pipette glass recording MEA date: 01-31-2013 19:46 gmt revision:6 [5] [4] [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

IEEE-4065599 (pdf) Comments on Microelectrodes

  • The amplifiers themselves, even back in 1950's, posed no problems -- low bandwidth. All that is required is low noise and high input impedance.
  • KCl Glass electrodes are LPF (10M resistive + 10pf parasitic capacitance); metal HPF (capacitive).
    • The fluid tip will not see external triphasic spikes of vertebrate axons above the noise level.
  • Metal probe the most useful.
  • Pt electrode in CSF behaves like a capacitor at low voltage across a broad frequency range. CSF has compounds that retard oxidation; impedance is more resistive with physiological saline.
  • Noise voltage generated by a metal electrode best specified by equivalent noise resistance at room temperature, E rmsnoise=4kTR nδF R_n should equal the real part of the electrode impedance at the same frequency.
  • Much of electrochemistry: solid AgCl diffuses away from an electrode tip with great speed and can hardly be continuously formed with an imposed current. Silver forms extremely stable complexes with organic molecules having attached amino and sulfhydril groups which occur in plenty where the electrode damages the tissue. Finally, the reduction-oxidation potential of axoplasm is low enough to reduce methylene blue, which places it below hydrogen. AgCl and HgCl are reduced.
  • The external current of nerve fibers is the second derivative of the traveling spike, the familiar triphasic (??) transient.
  • Svaetichin [1] and Dowben and Rose [3] plated with Platinum black. This increases the surface area.
    • Very quickly it burns onto itself a shell of very adherent stuff. It is kept from intimate contact with the tissue around it by a shell.
    • We found that if we add gelatin to the chloroplatinic acid bath from which we plate the Pt, the ball is not only made adherent to the tip but is, in a sense, prepoisoned and does not burn a shell into itself.
  • glass insulation using woods metal (which melts at a very low temperature). Platinum ball was plated onto 2-3um pipette tip. 3um gelatinized platinum black ball, impedance 100kOhm at 1kHz.
    • Highly capacitive probe: can be biased to 1 volt by a polarizing current of 1e-10 amp. (0.1nA).
  • Getting KCl solution into 1um pipettes is quite hard! They advise vacuum boiling to remove the air bubbles.
  • Humble authors, informative paper.

____References____

' ''' ()

{1057}
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ref: Kozai-2009.11 tags: electrodes insertion Kozai flexible polymer momolayer date: 01-30-2013 04:45 gmt revision:10 [9] [8] [7] [6] [5] [4] [head]

PMID-19666051[0] Insertion shuttle with carboxyl terminated self-assembled monolayer coatings for implanting flexible polymer neural probes in the brain.

  • This study investigated the use of an electronegative (hydrophillic) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) as a coating on a stiff insertion shuttle to carry a polymer probe into the cerebral cortex, and then the detachment of the shuttle from the probe by altering the shuttle's hydrophobicity.
    • Used 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid. Details included.
    • SAM atrtacts water once inserted, causing the hydrophobic polymer to move away.
      • Why not make the polymer hydrophillic?
      • Is this just soap?
  • Used agarose brain model.
  • Good list of references for the justification of soft electrodes, and researched means for addressing this, mostly usnig polymer stiffeners.
    • "Computer models and experimental studies of the probe–tissue interface suggest that flexible and soft probes that approach the brain’s bulk material characteristics may help to minimize micromotion between the probe and surrounding tissue ({737}; {1203}; {1102}; {1200}; LaPlaca et al., 2005; {1216}; Neary et al., 2003 PMID-12657694; {1198})"
  • "However, polymer probes stick to metallic and silicon surfaces through hydrophobic interactions, causing the polymer probe to be carried out of the brain when the insertion shuttle is removed. The solution is to use a highly hydrophillic, electronegative, self-assembled monolayer coating on the shuttle.
  • Biran et al 2005 suggests that incremental damage due to stab wounds from the shuttle (needle) should be minor.
  • Probes: 12.5 um thick, 196 um wide, and 1.2cm long, polymide substrate and custom designed lithographed PDMS probes.
  • Polymer probes were inserted deep - 8.5 mm.
  • PDMS probes inserted with non-coated insertion shuttle resulted in explantation of the PDMS probe.

____References____

[0] Kozai TD, Kipke DR, Insertion shuttle with carboxyl terminated self-assembled monolayer coatings for implanting flexible polymer neural probes in the brain.J Neurosci Methods 184:2, 199-205 (2009 Nov 15)

{781}
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ref: Polikov-2005.1 tags: neural response glia histology immune electrodes recording 2005 Tresco Michigan microglia date: 01-29-2013 00:34 gmt revision:10 [9] [8] [7] [6] [5] [4] [head]

PMID-16198003[0] Response of brain tissue to chronically implanted neural electrodes

  • Good review (the kind where figures are taken from other papers). Nothing terribly new (upon a very cursory inspection)
  • When CNS damage severs blood vessels, microglia are indistinguishable from the blood borne, monocyte-derived macrophages that are recruited by the degranulation of platelets and the cellular release of cytokines.
  • Furthermore, microglia are known to secrete, either constitutively, or in response to pathological stimuli, neurotrophic factors that aid in neuronal survival and growth.
    • Also release cytotoxic and neurotoxic factors that can lead to neuronal death in vitro.
    • It has been suggested that the presence of insoluble materials in the brain may lead to a state of 'frustrated phagocytosis' or inability of the macrophages to remove the foreign body, resulting in persistent release of neurotoxic substances.
  • When a 10x10 array of silicon probes was implanted in feline cortex, 60% of the needle tracks showed evidence of hemorrhage and 25% showed edema upon explantation of the probes after one day (Schmidt et al 1993) {1163}
    • Although a large number of the tracks were affected, only 3-5% of the area was actually covered by hemorrhages and edema, suggesting the actual damage to blood vessels may have been relatively minor. (!!)
  • Excess fluid and cellular debris diminishes 6-8 days due to the action of activated microglia and re-absorption.
  • As testament to the transitory nature of this mechanically induced wound healing response, electrode tracks could not be found in animals after several months when the electrode was inerted and quickly removed (Yuen and Agnew 1995, Rousche et al 2001; Csicsvari et al 2003, Biran et al 2005).
  • Biran et al 2005: observed persistent ED-1 immunoreactivity around silicon microelectrode arrays implanted in rat cortex at 2 and 4 weeks following implantation; not seen in microelectrode stab wound controls.
  • On the glial scar:
    • observed in the CNS of all vertebrates, presumably to isolate damaged parts of the nervous system and maintain the integrity of the blood-brain barrier.
    • mostly composed of reactive astrocytes.
    • presumably the glial scar insulates electrodes from nearby neurons, hindering diffusion and increasing impedance.
  • On the meninges:
    • Meningeal fibroblasts, which also stain for vimentin, but not for GFAP, may migrate down the electrode shaft from the brain surface and form the early basis for the glial scar.
  • On recording quality:
    • Histological examination upon explantation revealed that every electrode with stable unit recordings had at least one large neuron near the electrode tip, while every electrode that was not able to record resolvable action potentials was explanted from a site with no large neurons nearby.
  • Perhaps the clearest example of this variability was observed in the in vivo response to plastic “mock electrodes” implanted in rabbit brain by Stensaas and Stensaas (1976) {1210} and explanted over the course of 2 years. They separated the response into three types: Type 1 was characterized by little to no gliosis with neurons adjacent to the implant, Type 2 had a reactive astrocyte zone, and Type 3 exhibited a layer of connective tissue between the reactive astrocyte layer and the implant, with neurons pushed more than 100 um away. All three responses are well documented in the literature; however this study found that the model electrodes produced all three types of reactions simultaneously,depending on where along the electrode one looked.

____References____

[0] Polikov VS, Tresco PA, Reichert WM, Response of brain tissue to chronically implanted neural electrodes.J Neurosci Methods 148:1, 1-18 (2005 Oct 15)

{946}
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ref: Salcman-1976.01 tags: Salcman electrodes recording chronic microelectrode array MEA original parylene date: 01-28-2013 22:18 gmt revision:8 [7] [6] [5] [4] [3] [2] [head]

PMID-1256090[0] A new chronic recording intracortical microelectrode

  • maintain that tethering is the rational way to go: it "re-establishes the normal biomechanics of the intact cranial vault". (Salcman 1972, 1973) {1010}
    • have model of electrode tip motion in response to brain-skull displacements (Goldstein and Salcman 1973) {1011}
      • Electrode would have a tip displacement of about 5um in response to a 1mm displacement of the electrode's point of entry into the skull.
      • Exponential dependence on recording amplitude and distance (Rall, 1962). Gradient: 7.5uv/um; movements of more than 1-2um can radically alter the recordnig shape.
      • Probably our electrodes work because the dura & gliosis becomes firmly attached to the electrode shafts.
    • not really an array so much as a number (10-12) of single-unit electrodes.
  • Details the process of parylene-C deposition, electrode microwelding, etc. Pretty cool stuff -- what has happened to this technology?
  • Each bubble is glued with cyanocrylate to the pia. (they too question the safety of this).
  • arrays can be manually inserted via forceps.
  • 25um iridium wire electroplated in 1-2um of gold
    • then electo-etched until the desired tip geometry is achieved, 1-3um diameter
    • and vacuum coated in 3um of parylene-C.
    • Impedance 1-2M with a 1kHz sine wave at 10nA. Impedance is inversely related to the frequency of the test current, phase angle of 70-80deg.
      • Ref Robinson, 1968.
    • We must emphasize the extreme sensitivity of electrode measurements to the test conditions. Measured values of Z e are usually increased 1-3M when the electrode has been stored away for a few days. Removing the electrode from the test bath for a few minutes in air can lead to equally large increases when the electrode is tested upon remersion. [...] might be oxide.
    • Pinholes are the usual failure mechanism (KD Wise 2004), {149}; parylene is 'pinhole-free'.
  • The connecting 25um Au lead is very flexible and imposes little stress on the iridium electrode.
    • Connecting wire coated in 12um of parylene C
    • Would prefer even finer wire, 12um.
  • Perspex window over the craniotomy; had a vent in this window which they could open.
  • Opening the vent would cause the brain to pulse, moving the electrodes through the cortex and changing neural activity.
  • Size of an electrode is limited by ability to introduce it into the brain.
    • Electrode must be introduced through the pia; as the pial vessels supply the cortex (or drain the cortex).
    • For their electrodes, P crit=0.9g ; the force necessary to penetrate the pia is 0.05 - 0.2g.
  • pure iridium is stiffer than Pt-Ir by a factor of 3 or so. (521 G N/m^2 = 521 GPa, higher than tungsten, which is 400 Gpa)
    • Pure iridium is apparently the stiffest metallic element ref
  • Interesting: "Once again we are impressed by the fact that passive recording electrodes exhibit drops in impedance in the living system which they never show on in vitro testing in protein solutions at 37C.
    • Between 40 and 50 days, a slow downward trend becomes noticeable; this trend continues for the life of the animal and asymptotically approaches values below 500k. Electrodes still record.
    • See {999}
    • Surmise that pure iridium electrodes have a different metal-electrolyte interface than more conventional metals (Pl and W).
  • Mention that the ultimate purpose is for a neural prosthesis.
    • Their then use was for recordings from M1 in monkeys and V1 from cats. (Schmidt, Bak, McIntosh 1974)
  • Ref Wise et al {1012}.

____References____

[0] Salcman M, Bak MJ, A new chronic recording intracortical microelectrode.Med Biol Eng 14:1, 42-50 (1976 Jan)

{1036}
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ref: -0 tags: decoding recording todo read biocompatibility histology electrodes future date: 01-28-2013 20:52 gmt revision:9 [8] [7] [6] [5] [4] [3] [head]

Things to read!

decoding:

  • PMID-20359500 Population decoding of motor cortical activity using a generalized linear model with hidden states
  • Robust satisficing linear regression: Performance/robustness trade-off and consistency criterion
  • PMID-15813408 Closed-loop cortical control of direction using support vector machines
  • Efficient Decoding With Steady-State Kalman Filter in Neural Interface Systems
    • Fixed gain: We analyze a low-complexity Kalman filter implementation in which the filter gain is approximated by its steady-state form, computed offline before real-time decoding commences.
    • We also find that the steady-state Kalman filter reduces the computational load (algorithm execution time) for decoding the firing rates of 25±3 single units by a factor of 7.0±0.9.

electrodes:

other random scribblings: Vascularization {1027} histology {736},{737} and size {1028},{747},{1026}, insulation {1033}. How very very important -- as important or moreso than the recording technology. What has happened to {149} ?

{1177}
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ref: -0 tags: magnetic flexible insertion japan neural recording electrodes date: 01-28-2013 03:54 gmt revision:2 [1] [0] [head]

IEEE-1196780 (pdf) 3D flexible multichannel neural probe array

  • Shoji Takeuchi1, Takafumi Suzuki2, Kunihiko Mabuchi2 and Hiroyuki Fujita
  • wild -- they use a magnetic field to make the electrodes stand up!
  • Electrodes released with DRIE, as with Michigan probes.
  • As with many other electrodes, pretty high electrical impedance - 1.5M @ 1kHz.
    • 20x20um recording sites on 10um parylene.
  • Could push these into a rat and record extracellular APs, but nothing quantitative, no histology either.
  • Used a PEG coating to make them stiff enough to insert into the ctx (phantom in IEEE conference proceedings.)

{895}
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ref: XindongLiu-2006.03 tags: neural recording electrodes stability cat parlene McCreery MEA date: 01-28-2013 02:50 gmt revision:7 [6] [5] [4] [3] [2] [1] [head]

IEEE-1605268 (pdf) Evaluation of the Stability of Intracortical Microelectrode Arrays

  • 35-50um IR electrodes, electrolytically sharpened at a 10 deg angle, with a 5um blunted tip.
  • Electrodes coated in parylene, and exposed at the tip with an eximer laser. Surface area of tip ~500um^2.
  • Sorted based on features (duration, pk-pk, ratio of + to -, ratio of + time to - time), followed by a demixing matrix (PCA?)
  • Did experiments in 25 cats with some task (for another paper?); got recordings for up to 800 days. Seems consistent with our results.
  • Neurons were stable (by their metrics) for up to 60 days.
  • sparse arrays showed stable recordings sooner than dense arrays, perhaps because they are larger and more qucikly become attached to the dura.
  • Electrodes were always unstable for the first 2-3 months. Stability index is as high as 30-40 days.
  • Average electrode yield was ~ 25%.
  • no histology.

____References____

Xindong Liu and McCreery, D.B. and Bullara, L.A. and Agnew, W.F. Evaluation of the stability of intracortical microelectrode arrays Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering, IEEE Transactions on 14 1 91 -100 (2006)

{1010}
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ref: Salcman-1973.07 tags: Salcman MEA microelectrodes chronic recording glass cyanocrylate date: 01-28-2013 02:37 gmt revision:6 [5] [4] [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

IEEE-4120641 (pdf) Design, Fabrication, and In Vivo Behavior of Chronic Recording Intracortical Microelectrodes

  • Teflon-coated 25um Pt-Ir (90/10)
  • Heat fuse this with a glass micropipette & backfill with cyanoacrylate. {1011}
    • Isobutyl acrylate is hydrolysed more slowly and hence is less toxic to the surronding tissue
    • cyanoacrylate is apparently biodegradable.
  • Durable, stable: one electrode displayed a single cortical spike (though not necessarily the same one) for more than 90 consecutive days.
  • unacceptably low impedance = 100K or less
  • Unit activity was present only 10-24H after surgery.
  • formal review of even older microelectrode studies.
  • 10nA should be 100x too small to have any effect on a platinum tip [17]
  • A seperable cell with a SNR of 3:1 would become lost if the electrode tip moved 15um away from a 20um soma.
    • "It becomes clear that the problem of holding single units for prolonged periods in the unrestrained animal is not achieved without considerable difficulty". Yet they think they have solved it.

____References____

Salcman, Michael and Bak, Martin J. Design, Fabrication, and In Vivo Behavior of Chronic Recording Intracortical Microelectrodes Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on BME-20 4 253 -260 (1973)

{78}
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ref: Musallam-2007.02 tags: Musallam MEA floating rats electrodes date: 01-28-2013 00:42 gmt revision:7 [6] [5] [4] [3] [2] [1] [head]

PMID-17067683[0] A floating metal microelectrode array for chronic implantation

  • Cite Gualtierotti and Bailey (1968) for a neutral-boyancy electrode w/ rigid shaft.
  • Alumina ceramic base, laser drilled.
  • insulated with silane follwed by parylene-C, 3um.
  • Tips exposed by eximer laser. (Schmidt et al, 1995)
  • Electrophysiology, but not histology.
  • Earlier conference proceedings: PMID-17946982[1] Active floating micro electrode arrays (AFMA).

____References____

[0] Musallam S, Bak MJ, Troyk PR, Andersen RA, A floating metal microelectrode array for chronic implantation.J Neurosci Methods 160:1, 122-7 (2007 Feb 15)
[1] Kim T, Troyk PR, Bak M, Active floating micro electrode arrays (AFMA).Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 1no Issue 2807-10 (2006)

{736}
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ref: Liu-1999.09 tags: electrodes recording tissue response MEA histology date: 01-28-2013 00:24 gmt revision:7 [6] [5] [4] [3] [2] [1] [head]

PMID-10498377[0] Stability of the interface between neural tissue and chronically implanted intracortical microelectrodes.

  • implanted 7-shaft 35um iridium electrodes into the pericruciate gyrus of cats & measured the stability of recordings over several months.
  • electrodes were floating, under the dura; they note that connective tissue can force these floating arrays out of the brain, in further, or can encapsulate the electrodes.
    • electrodes activated by 'potentiodynamic cycling' to remove the insulation from the tip, I guess.
    • Insulation is epoxylite epoxy (5-10um thick) which is baked for curing and degassing at 100 and 170C each for 30 minutes.
    • more information on their fabrication in {1105}
  • Used the now-standard techniques for recording & analysis - amazing that this was all very new 10 years ago!
  • Measure stability not only on waveform shape (which will change as the position of the electrode relative to the neuron changes) but also neural tuning.
  • Lymphocytes were found to accumulate around the tips of the microstimulated sites.
  • Electrode sites that yielded recordings ('active') were all clean, with large neurons near the end, and with minimal connective tissue sheath (2-8 um; distance to nearby neurons was 30-50um).
    • Longest period for an active electrode was 242 days.
    • Electrode impedance was usually between 50 and 75 kOhm; there was no insulation failure.
  • Electrodes were stable even when the cat vigorously shook it's head in response to water placed on the head (!).
  • Electrodes were very unstable the first 2 weeks - 1 month ; rather stable thereafter.
    • Active electrodes tended to remain active ; inactive electrodes tended to remain inactive.

____References____

[0] Liu X, McCreery DB, Carter RR, Bullara LA, Yuen TG, Agnew WF, Stability of the interface between neural tissue and chronically implanted intracortical microelectrodes.IEEE Trans Rehabil Eng 7:3, 315-26 (1999 Sep)
[1] Bullara LA, McCreery DB, Yuen TG, Agnew WF, A microelectrode for delivery of defined charge densities.J Neurosci Methods 9:1, 15-21 (1983 Sep)

{746}
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ref: Sanders-2000.1 tags: polymer fiber immune reaction biocompatibility rats polycaprolactone recording electrodes histology MEA date: 01-28-2013 00:01 gmt revision:11 [10] [9] [8] [7] [6] [5] [head]

PMID-10906696[0] Tissue response to single-polymer fibers of varying diameters: evaluation of fibrous encapsulation and macrophage density.

  • Fibers smaller than 6μm show reduced immune response.
    • Fibers implanted in the subcutaneous dorsum (below the skin in the back of rats).
    • Polypropylene. (like rope).
    • Wish the result extended to small beads & small electrodes. 7μm is tiny, but possible with insulated Au wires.
      • Beads: try PMID-1913150 -- shows that the 600um - 50um beads ('microspheres') are well tolerated.
      • Also {750}.
  • Macrophage density in tissue with fiber diameters 2.1-5.9um comparable to that of unoperated contralateral control.

"

fiber diametercapsule thickness
2.1-5.90.6
6.5-10.611.7
11.1-15.820.3
16.7-26.725.5

____References____

[0] Sanders JE, Stiles CE, Hayes CL, Tissue response to single-polymer fibers of varying diameters: evaluation of fibrous encapsulation and macrophage density.J Biomed Mater Res 52:1, 231-7 (2000 Oct)

{897}
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ref: Harris-2011.08 tags: microelectrodes nanocomposite immune response glia recording MEA date: 01-27-2013 22:19 gmt revision:5 [4] [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-21654037[0] In vivo deployment of mechanically adaptive nanocomposites for intracortical microelectrodes

  • J P Harris, A E Hess, S J Rowan, C Weder, C A Zorman, D J Tyler and J R Capadona Case Western University.
  • Simple idea: electrodes should be rigid enough to penetrate the brain, yet soft enough to not damage it once implanted.
  • Many studies have shown that shear stress around a microelectrode shaft causes neural die-off and glial response.
  • You can only record from neurons if they are < 100um from the electrode tip.
  • Nanocomposite material is inspired by sea cucumber skin.
    • Our materials exhibit this behaviour by mimicking the architecture and proposed switching mechanism at play in the sea cucumber dermis by utilizing a polymer NC consisting of a controllable structural scaffold of rigid cellulose nanofibres embedded within a soft polymeric matrix. When the nanofibres percolate, they interact with each other through hydrogen bonding and form a nanofibre network that becomes the load-bearing element, leading to a high overall stiffness of the NC. When combined with a polymer system which additionally undergoes a phase transition at physiologically relevant temperatures, a contrast of over two orders of magnitude for the tensile elastic modulus is exhibited.
  • Probes were 200um wide, 100um thick, and had a point sharpened to 45deg.
  • Buckle force testing was done on 53um thick, 125um wide probes sharpened to a 30deg point.
  • Penetration stress through the rat pia is 1.2e7 dynes/cm^2 for a Si probe 40um thick and 80um wide.
  • See also {1198}

____References____

[0] Harris JP, Hess AE, Rowan SJ, Weder C, Zorman CA, Tyler DJ, Capadona JR, In vivo deployment of mechanically adaptive nanocomposites for intracortical microelectrodes.J Neural Eng 8:4, 046010 (2011 Aug)

{1210}
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ref: Stensaas-1976.01 tags: histology implant electrodes immune response date: 01-25-2013 02:52 gmt revision:1 [0] [head]

PMID-782142[0] The reaction of the cerebral cortex to chronically implanted plastic needles.

  • Three different classes of result:
    • Type I is characterized by little or no gliosis and synapses within 1-5mu of the implant;
    • type II contains a pronounced zone of reactive astrocytes;
    • type III is typified by a zone of connective tissue near the implant surface
      • One implant can evince all 3 different types!
  • Already were thinking of neuroprosthetic devices.

____References____

[0] Stensaas SS, Stensaas LJ, The reaction of the cerebral cortex to chronically implanted plastic needles.Acta Neuropathol 35:3, 187-203 (1976)

{1196}
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ref: Skousen-2011.01 tags: electrodes immune response Tresco Wise Michigan histology GFAP atrocyte surface area foreign body response date: 01-25-2013 01:44 gmt revision:5 [4] [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-21867802[0] Reducing surface area while maintaining implant penetrating profile lowers the brain foreign body response to chronically implanted planar silicon microelectrode arrays.

  • We studied the chronic brain foreign body response to planar solid silicon microelectrode arrays and planar lattice arrays with identical penetrating profiles but with reduced surface area in rats after an 8-week indwelling period.
  • Using quantitative immunohistochemistry, we found that presenting less surface area after equivalent iatrogenic injury is accompanied by significantly less
    • persistent macrophage activation,
    • decreased blood brain barrier leakiness,
    • and reduced neuronal cell loss.
  • Could be a factor of micromotion, too -- the lattice array has more anchoring points (?)
  • They propose it's a factor of TNF- α concentration around the implants. This, and other proinflammatory and cytoxic cytokines, is released by macrophages.
  • "Recent studies from our lab have described disruption of BBB integrity, indicated by the presence of autologous IgG in the brain parenchyma, surrounding both microwire and planar silicon recording devices ([1][2]. Under normal conditions, autologous IgG is excluded from the brain parenchyma (Azzi et al., 1990; Seitz et al., 1985) but has been observed following BBB disruption (Aihara et al., 1994).
    • E.g. the presence of IgG proves that the BBB was compromised.
      • Less so with the lattice implants.
  • Previous work from our lab using single microwires and single shaft, planar silicon microelectrode arrays indicated that the spatial distribution of GFAP does not increase with time over the indwelling period and did not support the “increase in astrogliosis over time hypothesis” as a dominant or general biologically related failure mechanism for this type of microelectrode recording device {1197}.

____References____

[0] Skousen JL, Merriam SM, Srivannavit O, Perlin G, Wise KD, Tresco PA, Reducing surface area while maintaining implant penetrating profile lowers the brain foreign body response to chronically implanted planar silicon microelectrode arrays.Prog Brain Res 194no Issue 167-80 (2011)
[1] Winslow BD, Christensen MB, Yang WK, Solzbacher F, Tresco PA, A comparison of the tissue response to chronically implanted Parylene-C-coated and uncoated planar silicon microelectrode arrays in rat cortex.Biomaterials 31:35, 9163-72 (2010 Dec)
[2] Winslow BD, Tresco PA, Quantitative analysis of the tissue response to chronically implanted microwire electrodes in rat cortex.Biomaterials 31:7, 1558-67 (2010 Mar)

{1198}
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ref: Harris-2011.12 tags: mechanically adaptive electrodes implants case western dissolving flexible histology Harris date: 01-25-2013 01:39 gmt revision:5 [4] [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-22049097[0] Mechanically adaptive intracortical implants improve the proximity of neuronal cell bodies.

  • See also [1]
  • Initial tensile modulus of 5GPa dropped to 12MPa. (almost 500-fold!)
    • Their polymer nanocomposite (NC) still swells 65-70% (with water?)
    • Implant size 100 x 200um.
  • Controlled with tungsten of identical size and coating.
  • Tethered to skull.
  • Interesting:
    • The neuronal nuclei density within 100 µm of the device at four weeks post-implantation was greater for the compliant nanocomposite compared to the stiff wire.
    • At eight weeks post-implantation, the neuronal nuclei density around the nanocomposite was maintained, but the density around the wire recovered to match that of the nanocomposite.
    • Hypothesis, in discussion: softer implants are affecting the time-course of the response rather that final results
  • The glial scar response to the compliant nanocomposite was less vigorous than it was to the stiffer wire
  • Cultured astrocytes have been shown to respond to mechanical stimuli via calcium signaling (Ostrow and Sachs, 2005).
  • Substrate stiffness is also known to shift cell differentiation in mesenchymal stem cells to be neurogenic, myogenic, or osteogenic (Engler et al., 2006).
  • In vivo studies which focus on the effects of electrode tethering have shown that untethered implants reduce the extent of the glial scar (Biran et al., 2007; Kim et al., 2004; Subbaroyan, 2007)
  • Parylene, polymide, and PDMS still each have moduli 6 orders of mangitude larger than that of the brain.
  • In some of their plots, immune response is higher around the nanocomposites!
    • Could be that their implant is still too large / stiff?
  • Note that recent research shows that vitemin may have neuroprotective effects --
    • Research has linked vimentin expression to rapid neurite extension in response to damage (Levin et al., 2009)
    • NG2+ cells that express vimentin have been proposed to support repair of central nervous system (CNS) damage, and stabilize axons in response to dieback from ED1+ cells (Alonso, 2005; Nishiyama, 2007; Busch et al., 2010)
  • Prior work (Frampton et al., 2010 PMID-20336824[2]) hypothesizes that a more compact GFAP response increases the impedance of an electrode which may decrease the quality of electrode recordings.

____References____

[0] Harris JP, Capadona JR, Miller RH, Healy BC, Shanmuganathan K, Rowan SJ, Weder C, Tyler DJ, Mechanically adaptive intracortical implants improve the proximity of neuronal cell bodies.J Neural Eng 8:6, 066011 (2011 Dec)
[1] Harris JP, Hess AE, Rowan SJ, Weder C, Zorman CA, Tyler DJ, Capadona JR, In vivo deployment of mechanically adaptive nanocomposites for intracortical microelectrodes.J Neural Eng 8:4, 046010 (2011 Aug)
[2] Frampton JP, Hynd MR, Shuler ML, Shain W, Effects of glial cells on electrode impedance recorded from neuralprosthetic devices in vitro.Ann Biomed Eng 38:3, 1031-47 (2010 Mar)

{1208}
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ref: Lewitus-2011.08 tags: dissolving polymer electrodes histology degrading date: 01-25-2013 01:31 gmt revision:2 [1] [0] [head]

PMID-21609850[0] The fate of ultrafast degrading polymeric implants in the brain.

  • Tyrosene-derived terpolymer (protein?) dissolves within hours & was re-absorbed.
  • Second terpolymer degrades quickly but is not resorbed.
    • This type resulted in continuous glial activation and loss of neural tissue compared to first.
  • Makes sense, not unexpected.

____References____

[0] Lewitus DY, Smith KL, Shain W, Bolikal D, Kohn J, The fate of ultrafast degrading polymeric implants in the brain.Biomaterials 32:24, 5543-50 (2011 Aug)

{1111}
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ref: Stice-2007.06 tags: electrodes recording small rats S1 PGA histology GFAP date: 01-24-2013 21:07 gmt revision:9 [8] [7] [6] [5] [4] [3] [head]

PMID-17409479[0] Thin microelectrodes reduce GFAP expression in the implant site in rodent somatosensory cortex.

  • Implanted 12 um and 25 um polymide coated stainless steel
    • Wires coated with poly-glycolic acid (PGA) to facilitate implantation.
  • Only looked to 4 weeks.
  • 12 um implants significantly less GFAP (astrocyte) reactivity at 4 weeks, no difference at 2 weeks (figure 9 & 10).
    • B = bare, P = PGA coated.
  • Can use to bolster the idea that smaller implants are less irritating.

____References____

[0] Stice P, Gilletti A, Panitch A, Muthuswamy J, Thin microelectrodes reduce GFAP expression in the implant site in rodent somatosensory cortex.J Neural Eng 4:2, 42-53 (2007 Jun)

{749}
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ref: Biran-2007.07 tags: tresco biocompatibility tether skull electrodes Michigan probe recording Tresco date: 01-24-2013 20:11 gmt revision:6 [5] [4] [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-17266019[0] The brain tissue response to implanted silicon microelectrode arrays is increased when the device is tethered to the skull.

  • Good, convincing, figures.

____References____

[0] Biran R, Martin DC, Tresco PA, The brain tissue response to implanted silicon microelectrode arrays is increased when the device is tethered to the skull.J Biomed Mater Res A 82:1, 169-78 (2007 Jul)

{1192}
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ref: -2002 tags: sea slugs flexible electrodes polymide Washington date: 01-04-2013 18:46 gmt revision:0 [head]

IEEE-1002325 (pdf) Silicon micro-needles with flexible interconnections

  • Implanted their isolated needles (see also {219}) in sea slugs Tritonia diomedea
    • Sea slug neurons are large -- up to 400um -- makes recording easier.
  • Silicon needles fabricated via reactive ion etching and SF6 sharpening.
  • 'intracellular recording!
  • Pretty advanced fabrication, I guess.

{1164}
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ref: -0 tags: neural recording McGill Musallam electrodes date: 07-12-2012 22:53 gmt revision:0 [head]

http://www.mdpi.com/1424-8220/8/10/6704/pdf NeuroMEMS: Neuro Probe Microtechnologies

  • Good review (as of 2008) of the many different approaches for nervous system recording.

{923}
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ref: Freire-2011.01 tags: Nicolelis BMI electrodes immune respones immunohistochemistry chronic arrays rats 2011 MEA histology date: 06-29-2012 01:20 gmt revision:5 [4] [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-22096594[0] Comprehensive analysis of tissue preservation and recording quality from chronic multielectrode implants.

  • Says what might be expected: tungsten microelectrode arrays work, though the quality gradually declines over 6 months.
  • Histological markers correlated well with recording performance.
  • Shows persistent glial activation around electrode sites + cell body hypertropy.
    • Suggest that loss in recording quality may be due to glial encapsulation.
  • References
    • Szarowski et al 2003 {1028}
    • Ward et al 2009
  • Histology:
    • NADPH-d: nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase, via beta-NADP
    • CO: cytochrome oxidase, via diamnibenzidine DAB, cytochrome c and catalase.
      • both good for staining cortical layers; applied in a standard buffered solution and monitored to prevent overstaining.
  • Immunohistochemistry:
    • Activated microglia with ED-1 antibody.
    • Astrocytes labeled with glial fibrillary acid protein.
    • IEG with an antibody against EGR-1, 'a well-known marker of calcium dependent neuronal activity'
    • Neurofilament revealed using a monoclonal NF-M antibody.
    • Caspace-3 with the associated antibody
    • Details the steps for immunostaining -- wash, blocknig buffer, addition of the antibody in diluted blocking solution (skim milk) overnight, wash again, incubate in biotinylated secondary antibody, wash again, incubate in avidin-biotin-peroxidase solution.
    • Flourescent immunohistochemistry had biotynlation replaced with alexa Fluor 488-conjugated horse anti-mouse and Alexa Fluor 594-conjugated goat anti-rabbit overnight.

____References____

[0] Freire MA, Morya E, Faber J, Santos JR, Guimaraes JS, Lemos NA, Sameshima K, Pereira A, Ribeiro S, Nicolelis MA, Comprehensive analysis of tissue preservation and recording quality from chronic multielectrode implants.PLoS One 6:11, e27554 (2011)

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ref: -0 tags: Cogan 2008 electrodes recording stimulation date: 02-05-2012 00:21 gmt revision:0 [head]

PMID-18429704 Neural stimulation and recording electrodes.

  • Electrical stimulation of nerve tissue and recording of neural electrical activity are the basis of emerging prostheses and treatments for spinal cord injury, stroke, sensory deficits, and neurological disorders. An understanding of the electrochemical mechanisms underlying the behavior of neural stimulation and recording electrodes is important for the development of chronically implanted devices, particularly those employing large numbers of microelectrodes. For stimulation, materials that support charge injection by capacitive and faradaic mechanisms are available. These include titanium nitride, platinum, and iridium oxide, each with certain advantages and limitations. The use of charge-balanced waveforms and maximum electrochemical potential excursions as criteria for reversible charge injection with these electrode materials are described and critiqued. Techniques for characterizing electrochemical properties relevant to stimulation and recording are described with examples of differences in the in vitro and in vivo response of electrodes.

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ref: Vibert-1979.08 tags: spike sorting recording depth extracellular glass electrodes active feedback original date: 01-15-2012 06:46 gmt revision:3 [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-95711[0] Spike separation in multiunit records: A multivariate analysis of spike descriptive parameters

  • Glass coated tungsten microeletrodes have high capacitance; they compensate for this by spraying colloidal silver over the outside sheath of the glass, insulating that with varnish, and driving the shield in a positive-feedback way (stabillized in some way?) This negates the capacitance. 'low impedance capacitance compensated'.
    • Capacitance compensation really matters!!
  • Were able to record from single units for 40-100um range (average: 50um) with SNRs 2:1 to 7:1.
    • Some units had SNRs that could reach 15:1 (!!!), these could be recorded for 600 um of descent.
    • more than 3 units could usually be recognized at each recording point by visual inspection of the oscilloscope, and in some cases up to 6 units could be distinguished
    • Is there some clever RF way of neutralizing the capacitance of everything but the electrode tip? Hmm. Might as well try to minimize it.
  • Bandpass 300 Hz - 10 kHz.
  • When the signal crossed the threshold level, it was retained and assumed to be a spike if the duration of the first component was between 70 and 1000 us.
    • This 70 us lower limit was determined on a preliminary study as a fairly good rise time threshold for separation of fiber spikes from somatic or dendritic spikes.
    • I really need to do some single electrode recordings. Platt?
  • Would it be possible to implement this algorithm in realtime on the DSP?
  • Describe clustering based on PCA.
  • Programming this computer (PDP-12) must have been crazy!
  • They analyzed 20k spikes. Mango gives billions.
  • First principal component (F1) represented 60-65% of total information was based mostly on amplitude
  • Second principal component, 15-20% of total information represented mainly time parameters.
  • Suggested 3 parameters: Vmax, Vmin, and T3 (time from max to min).
  • Maybe they don't know what they are talking about:

____References____

[0] Vibert JF, Costa J, Spike separation in multiunit records: a multivariate analysis of spike descriptive parameters.Electroencephalogr Clin Neurophysiol 47:2, 172-82 (1979 Aug)

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ref: Porada-2000.01 tags: electrodes recording oblique inverted MEA arrays Kruger date: 01-05-2012 23:07 gmt revision:3 [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-10776811[0] More than a year of recording with up to 64 microelectrodes

  • for more than a year action potentials of good quality were obtained from most electrodes!
  • used 60mm-long, 12.5um Ni-Cr-Al (Isaohm) wire, polyimide insulated, soldered to microconnectors. Tips purely ('primitively') cut after bonding them to a piece of photographic film substrate.
  • implanted in the rabbit and marmoset V1 cortex from afar.
  • with the 8 rabbits they used a magnetic release to prevent excessive force from removing the implant.
  • used small sections of thicker wire to individually label the electrodes for x-ray; thusly could reconstruct the electrode positions. electrodes in the white matter were silent mais or menos.
  • the autocorrelation functions of the neurons generally look good; some of them do not have a refractory period though.
  • in GFAP-stained sections a single electrode track appeared as a hole of about 28 um wide. The outer diameter of the wire insulation as 18um. electrode tracts were not visible in cresyl violet tracts. the neurones near the electrode tips appeared normal.
  • we recorded signals for up to 711 days, during which time the recording quality did not degrade. nice, nice!
  • they think that the large length of free wire, running about 5mm through the brain provides a sufficient degree of friction so that locally the tissue is prevented from moving relative to the electrodes. They did not need to use microstimulation to improve recording quality.

____References____

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ref: QingBai and Wise-2001.08 tags: Bai Wise buffered MEA recording electrodes Michigan date: 01-05-2012 04:53 gmt revision:5 [4] [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

IEEE-936367 (pdf) Single-unit neural recording with active microelectrode arrays

  • Design neural probes with on-chip unity-gain amplifiers. Proven to not degrade recordings (indeed, it should help!)
  • 200ohm output impedance
  • 11uV RMS noise, 100Hz-10kHz.
  • Multiplexer adds 8uV rms noise. noise from clock transitions 2ppm.
  • Also built amplifiers with 40db voltage gain (100x).

____References____

Qing Bai and Wise, K.D. Single-unit neural recording with active microelectrode arrays Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on 48 8 911 -920 (2001)

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ref: Thomas-1972.09 tags: MEA electrodes cell culture platinum black date: 01-04-2012 02:40 gmt revision:6 [5] [4] [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-4672477[0] A miniature microelectrode array to monitor the bioelectric activity of cultured cells

  • Designed for heart cells.
  • 30-element muilt into the cluture chambers.
  • Utilizes PCB lithography technology. Indeed, the insulation is photoresist / 'photopolymer'.
  • platinum black

____References____

[0] Thomas CA Jr, Springer PA, Loeb GE, Berwald-Netter Y, Okun LM, A miniature microelectrode array to monitor the bioelectric activity of cultured cells.Exp Cell Res 74:1, 61-6 (1972 Sep)

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ref: Goldstein-1973.07 tags: Salcman microelectrodes bucking analysis stiffness youngs modulus mechanical MEA date: 01-04-2012 01:22 gmt revision:4 [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

IEEE-4120642 (pdf) Mechanical Factors in the Design of Chronic Recording Intracortical Microelectrodes

____References____

Goldstein, Seth R. and Salcman, Michael Mechanical Factors in the Design of Chronic Recording Intracortical Microelectrodes Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on BME-20 4 260 -269 (1973)

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ref: MolinaLuna-2007.03 tags: ICMS microstimulation cortical thin-film electrodes histology MEA date: 01-03-2012 22:54 gmt revision:2 [1] [0] [head]

PMID-17178423[0] Cortical stimulation mapping using epidurally implanted thin-film microelectrode arrays.

  • they claim that thin-film electrodes are better than microelectrode arrays, as they show less evidence of cortical damage.
    • thin-film electrodes show higher reproducability
    • more accurate spatial arrangement.
  • epidural stimulation (they were implanted between the dura and skull)

____References____

[0] Molina-Luna K, Buitrago MM, Hertler B, Schubring M, Haiss F, Nisch W, Schulz JB, Luft AR, Cortical stimulation mapping using epidurally implanted thin-film microelectrode arrays.J Neurosci Methods 161:1, 118-25 (2007 Mar 30)

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ref: Najafi-1990.05 tags: Najafi Michigan probe silicon strength electrodes recording MEA date: 01-03-2012 22:45 gmt revision:5 [4] [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-2345003[0] Strength characterization of silicon microprobes in neurophysiological tissues.

  • These active (with amplification/buffering circuitry) electrodes were around since 1990! It's been a while, and at least the devices are commercially available now.
  • Show that thin-film silicon is remarkably flexible and tough - about six times as strong as bulk silicon.
  • Have developed a silicon probe with an integrated phosphorous-doped polysilicon strain guague - nice.

____References____

[0] Najafi K, Hetke JF, Strength characterization of silicon microprobes in neurophysiological tissues.IEEE Trans Biomed Eng 37:5, 474-81 (1990 May)

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ref: Penfield-1937 tags: Penfield 1937 motor cortex stimulation ICMS human neurosurgery electrodes date: 01-03-2012 22:08 gmt revision:3 [2] [1] [0] [head]

No PMID / bibtex penfield-1937. Somatic motor and sensory representation in the cerebral cortex of man as studied by electrical stimulation

  • Fritsch and Hitzig (1870) [0] cited as the first paper in electrical excitation of the CNS.
  • Good review of the scientific experiments thereafter, including stimulation to S1 by Ferrier, work with apes etc.
  • Central sulcus called the 'Rolandic fissure'.
  • Interesting! quote:

The account of Bartholow (1874) is interesting to say the least and may be cited. His patient was a 30-year old-domestic. As an infant this unfortunate had chanced to fall into the fire, burning her scalp so badly that " hair was never reproduced." A piece of whale bone in the wig she was forced to wear irritated the scarred scalp and, by her statement, three months before she was admitted, an ulcer appeared. When she presented herself for relief, this had eroded the skull over a space 2 in. in diameter " where the pulsations of the brain are plainly seen." Although " rather feeble-minded " Bartholow observed that Mary returned replies to all questions and no sensory or motor loss could be made out in spite of the fact that brain substance apparently had been injured in the process of evacuation of pus from the infected area. The doctor believed, therefore, that fine insulated needles could be introduced without further damage.

While the electrodes were in the right side Bartholow decided to try the effect of more current. ' Her countenance exhibited great distress and she began to cry. Very soon the left hand was extended as if in the act of taking hold of some object in front of her; the arm presently was agitated with clonic spasms ; her eyes became fixed with pupils widely dilated ; the lips were blue and she frothed at the mouth ; her breathing became stertorous, she lost conscious-ness and was violently convulsed on the left side. This convulsion lasted for five minutes and was succeeded by coma. She returned to consciousness in twenty minutes from the beginning of the attack and complained of some weakness and vertigo." Three days after this stimulation, following a series of right-sided seizures, the patient died.

  • Relatively modern neurosurgical procedures.
  • They observe changes to blood circulation prior epileptic procedures. wow!
  • Very careful hand-drawn maps of what they have observed. Important, as you'll probably never get this trough an IRB. It pays to be meticulous.

____References____

[0] Fritsch G, Hitzig E, Electric excitability of the cerebrum (Uber die elektrische Erregbarkeit des Grosshirns).Epilepsy Behav 15:2, 123-30 (2009 Jun)

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ref: Lebedev-2006.09 tags: misha lebedev nicolelis BMI past present future electrodes review MEA date: 01-03-2012 03:26 gmt revision:2 [1] [0] [head]

PMID-16859758 Brain-machine interfaces: past, present and future.

  • Describes the state of the art & what needs to be done. Namely, better recording quality.
  • state that current EEG BMIs are limited to 5-25 bits/min (typo!!) [2,11]
    • [2] Wolpaw "Brain-computer interfaces for communication and control" 2002.
    • [11] Birbaumer "Brain-computer-interface research: coming of age" 2006.
  • set of references on biofeedback control of EEG in research animals.
  • EEG BCIs are either biofeedback based or classifier (P300, synchronous decoder ) based.
  • First invasive BMIs Fetz [40-45], Schmidt [46]; progress has been limited by technology. Must have been quite challenging for him to do the research!
    • [40] Fetz "Operant Conditioning of cortical unit activity" 1969
    • [41] Fetz "Are movement parameters recognizably coded in activity of single neurons?" 1992
    • [42] Fetz and Baker "Operantly conditioned patterns on precentral unit activity and correlated responses in adjacent cells and contralateral muscles." 1973
    • [43] Fetz and Finocchio "Operant Conditioning of specific patterns of neural and muscular activity" 1971
    • [44] Fetz and Finocchio "Operant conditioning of isolated activity in specific muscles and precentral cells" 1972
    • [45] Fetz and Finocchio 1975 "Correlations between activity of motor cortex cells and arm muscles during operantly conditioned response patterns." 1975
    • [46] Schmidt "single neuron recording from motor cortex as a possible source of signals for control of external devices." 1980
  • microelectrode arrays solved one of the problems.
  • talk about how more neurons are needed.
  • Principles of BMIs: Evarts [66-68], neuronal modulations are highly variable [69-72].
    • [66] Evarts, E.V. (1966) Pyramidal tract activity associated with a conditioned hand movement in the monkey.
    • [67] Evarts, E.V. (1968) Relation of pyramidal tract activity to force exerted during voluntary movement.
    • [68] Evarts, E.V. (1968) A technique for recording activity of subcortical neurons in moving animals.
    • "THus, as much as neighboring neurons might display highly disinct firing modulation patterns during the execution of a particular movement, single-neuron firing can vary substantially from one trial to the next, despite the fact that the overt movements remain virtually identical. :
    • "averaging across large populations of neurons significantly reduces the variability of signals derived from single neurons [54, 69].
    • Should i mention this in thesis?
  • Better way to assimilate the BMI into the body is to have proprioceptive feedback.
  • suggest the same standard things to be improved, excluding electronics. :
    • electrodes / recording
    • decoding
    • incorporating plasticity
    • better prosthetics.
  • "multi-unit signals can also be efficiently used in BMI control [57] {318}.
  • Some groups have strongly claimed that recordings from a small number of neurons can be sufficient for good performance in a BMI. [55,56,63]
    • This is not Miguel's approach: more neurons confers accuracy [54{317},57,70] and reliability [69].
      • [70] Wessberg, J. and Nicolelis, M.A. (2004) Optimizing a linear algorithm for real-time robotic control using chronic cortical ensemble recordings in monkeys. J. Cogn. Neurosci. 16, 1022–1035
  • Still need new microelectrodes; electrodes become encapsulated by fibrous tissue and cells die in the vicinity of electrodes [77] {781}.
    • suggest anti-inflammatory coating, though the jury is out.
  • Initial wireless telemetry systems: [93-99]. [93]{315}
    • [94] Knutti, J.W. et al. (1979) An integrated circuit approach to totally implantable telemetry systems. Biotelem. Patient Monit. 6, 95–106
    • [97] Chien, C.N. and Jaw, F.S. (2005) Miniature telemetry system for the recording of action and field potentials. J. Neurosci. Methods 147
    • [98] {930}
    • [99] Morizio Morizio, J. et al. (2005) Fifteen-channel wireless headstage system for single-unit rat recordings.
    • [100] (of broader interest) Moxon, K.A. et al. (2004) Ceramic-based multisite electrode arrays for chronic single-neuron recording. IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 51, 647–656
  • nanotechnology probes that access the brain through the vasular system [101].
  • although a good number of linear and nonlinear algorithms have been proposed and tested [1,54,56,57,70,110-116], Wiener filters have proved sufficient [54,55,57,58,65,117].
  • almost 140 years ago Head and Holmes suggested that the body schema -- that is, the internal brain representation of one's body -- could extend itself to include a wielded tool.

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ref: WISE-2004.01 tags: wireless electrodes silicon Michigan Kipke Najafi recording MEA date: 01-03-2012 03:23 gmt revision:12 [11] [10] [9] [8] [7] [6] [head]

IEEE-01258173 (pdf) Wireless implantable microsystems: high-density electronic interfaces to the nervous system - January 2004.

  • very impressive!
  • based on the old / well established beam-lead technology (see the image of the paper at the bottom of that page).
    • required 20 years of development to create an etching process with sufficient yield, though. Microprobes have been in development since 1966.
    • Silicon is slowly attacked by saline; however, the use of a boron etch-stop to define the substrate virtually eliminates such erosion.
    • Silicon dioxide is known to slowly hydrate in water, but this can be mitigated by CVD of silicon nitride / silicon oxide stacks. Polysilicon can be used too, since it forms a tight bond with silicon oxide, keeping water out.
      • Why don't they just seal it with a known impermeable plastic/epoxy/whatever? (They do, later) Utah probe is sealed in parylene.
    • Shunt capacitance is negligible compared to site capacitance; heavy substrate doping minimizes electrical or optically induced noise & virtually eliminates crosstalk.
    • (Of course) Silicon allows amplifiers and circuitry to be formed at/near the electrode, eliminating the need for (some) interconnects.
    • Silicon ribbon connectors cannot be made much longer than a few centimeters. 4um thick silicon cables are 100x more flexible than a 25um gold wire (!!) - but that is out-of-plane; they are relatively weak for in-plane stress.
  • Gold has a maximum charge delivery of 20uC/cm^2 ; platinum, 75 uC/cm^2 ; iridium oxide, 3000 uC/cm^2.
  • Glass can be hermetically bonded to silicon if both flat clean surfaces are put in opposition with a high voltage (1500V) placed across the interface at an elevated temperature (400C). These packages have been shown to be stable and inert in guinea pigs.
    • Silicon nitride, thin metal films, and metal films over polymers are all attractive coatings for probes (with no mention of biocompatibility); they last decades in salt water, and eventually succumb to pinholes.
  • Silicon probes outperform microwire arrays by a factor of (up to) 50 in terms of volume of tissue displaced / recording site. Michigan probes are typically 15um thick x 60um in cross section.
  • they tend to use many more recording sites than recording channels, hence, have a low expected yield. e.g. they have a 1024 site electrode (see the cool figures!), and can record from the best 128 of those. good idea, reasonable strategy, I guess.
    • they demonstrate that it is not too hard to remove the artifact of multiplexing on their systems - the multiplexing noise is below electrode noise.
  • talk about spongifying their iridium electrodes using current pulses in a PBS solution to (apparently) lower electrode impedance.
  • talk about drug delivery too
  • describe the exact manufacturing procedures that the Michigan arrays are created, including the critical back-etch (which i don't exactly understand).
  • describe the circuits used to amplify low-level neural signals.
  • Their charge-redistribution ADC is okay - 250ksps, 9b resolution, 1.4mW from a 3v source. Commercial ADCS are better - AD7467 is 0.6mw, 200ksps, 10bits. (though it scales up to 1.3mW @ 3V, 200ksps ; 0.36mW @1.8V - so the devices are comparable.)
  • some of the (very tiny) electrodes have 'holes' (!)
  • also have wireless microstimulators.
  • demonstrate long-term recording: 383days post implant in a rat & there are still many cells (though the figure is not that great, it is easy to understand) (this might be an exemplar)
  • associated website?
  • (quote:) "For ranges of a few centimeters, the high attenuation of RF signals in biological tissue dictates carrier frequencies below 10Mhz." Their solution is to use FSK with octave jumps in freqency & modulation rates up to 60% that of the carrier frequency.

____References____

WISE, K.D. and ANDERSON, D.J. and HETKE, J.F. and KIPKE, D.R. and NAJAFI, K. Wireless implantable microsystems: high-density electronic interfaces to the nervous system Proceedings of the IEEE 92 1 76 - 97 (2004)

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ref: Csicsvari-2003.08 tags: recording michigan silicon electrodes Buzsaki MEA date: 01-03-2012 03:23 gmt revision:4 [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-12904510[0] Csicsvari 2003 Massively parallel recording of unit and local field potentials with silicon-based electrodes

  • What's so massive? 64 or 96 channel Michigan probes.
  • Motivation: recording local connections and interactions requires precise knoledge of the location of your recording sites.
  • Some classic refs on cortical building blocks.
  • Optical recording: Mao et al 2001 PMID-11738033.
  • Wired recording:, Chicurel 2001; Deadwyler and Hampson 1995 PMID-7481817; Evarts 1968; {994}
  • Tetrodes: Drake 1988, Gray 1995, McNaughton et al 1983; Recce and O'Keefe 1989.
  • on-chip active circuitry (simple voltage feedback op-amp - without reference electrodes!) reduces microphone artifact. 6mm 'antenna'.
    • refs: Bai and Wise 2001 {995}; Olsson et al. 2002
    • also Najafi and Wise 1986 {996}; Wise and Najafi 1991 .
  • Stored wideband data; sorted via KlustaKwik.
  • Total recording area 1.6mm deep by 1.8mm wide. Shanks separated by 300um ; recordings sites separated by 100um; shanks 12um thick.
    • Made via double-sided deep reactive reactive ion etching (DRIE).
  • stimulated the entorhinal cortex & recorded in the hippocampus; used the precise spatial layout of the micromachined silicon electrodes to map out the evoked potentials.
  • figure 3 shows that they can record the 'same' neuron from multiple 100um-spaced sites on a given shank. Some of this is due to the physically large extent of the hippocampal cells which they recorded; spike propagate both down the axon and back into the soma, and by using Current Source Density maps, they could estimate some of spatio-temporal characterisics of the AP.
    • CSD is the second spatial derivtive of the local field potentials.
    • Could measure forward and back-propagation of APs to the dendrites (!)
  • quote: in contrast to wire tetrodes with blunt cute ends, it was possible to record from the same cell layer numerous times after moving the probe up and subsequently back to the previous recording location.
    • size of the electrode shanks: 62um wide x 12um thick at top of recording site of 12 site shank; 82um wide at top of 16 site shank.
    • Top 4 recording sites' recording quality deteriorated with multiple penetrations.
  • good place-cell map; cells were discriminated based on a PCA across both time and electrode.

____References____

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ref: Nicolelis-2002.1 tags: Nicolelis MEA electrodes recording date: 01-03-2012 00:57 gmt revision:1 [0] [head]

PMID-12367642[0] Multielectrode recordings: the next steps.

  • Ensemble recordings have actually been around for a long time -- Schmidt, at least.
    • 100s of electrodes, however, have not.
  • Predicted the death of single unit recordings and the emergence of 1000s of channels with indefinite longevity.
  • Also talk about gene arrays & antisense RNA & cre/loxP. Oldish.

____References____

[0] Nicolelis MA, Ribeiro S, Multielectrode recordings: the next steps.Curr Opin Neurobiol 12:5, 602-6 (2002 Oct)

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ref: Nicolelis-1997.04 tags: nicolelis kralik electrodes electrophysiology 1997 date: 12-17-2011 01:41 gmt revision:3 [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-11812202[0] Techniques for long-term multisite neuronal ensemble recordings in behaving animals.

  • talk about moveable bundles.
  • human-level surgical techniques and anesthesia.
  • new methods of data analysis.

____References____

[0] Kralik JD, Dimitrov DF, Krupa DJ, Katz DB, Cohen D, Nicolelis MA, Techniques for long-term multisite neuronal ensemble recordings in behaving animals.Methods 25:2, 121-50 (2001 Oct)

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ref: bookmark-0 tags: neural recording companies electrodes wireless bioamplifier germany date: 10-22-2007 01:39 gmt revision:2 [1] [0] [head]

http://www.neuroconnex.com/ -- looks like they have some excellent products, but not sure how to purchase them.

  • links to specification sheets are broken.
  • they have a closed-loop stimulator for treatment of Parkinsons etc. cool!
also see Mega biomonitor. (14 bit resolution)